Persian Art Center in Carolina Presents: Dr. Pourzandi | Study of Sadegh Hedayat Part II

July 19, 2016 ” />

The program will begin with a social from 4-4:30, followed by a welcome and introduction by Amir Rezvani. The speaker is Dr. Pourzandi who will present part two in the study of Sadegh Hedayat, Iranian author who introduced modernist techniques into Persian fiction. He is considered one of the greatest Iranian writers of the 20th century. The presentation will be followed by discussion from 6-6:30pm. From 6:45-7:30 , there will be live music and poetry readings from your favorite poets.  The event will end with an open forum regarding planning for the future from 7:30-8:00pm.

The Persian Poetry Group in Chapel Hill honors, respects and promotes freedom of speech and expression. For more information, please call 919-259-0959 or visit Kodoom.com.


Great Cities in the Middle East: Tehran and Istanbul

July 19, 2016 ” />

The Program in the Humanities will kick off its fall Dialogues series by putting two great Middle Eastern cities, Tehran and Istanbul, into conversation with each other. Omid Safi will use Tehran as a backdrop for a discussion of the significant changes that have taken place in the 20th and 21st century contexts. Next, Banu Gökarıksel will take us through Istanbul and discuss the shifting role of religion within the Turkish context where Islam, secularism, gender, and consumer capitalism are fiercely contested. The seminar will conclude with an extended panel discussion where Dr. Safi will briefly present on Istanbul and both of our scholars will discuss the future of these Great Cities.

Topics and Speakers
Tehran and Modern Iranian History
Omid Safi, Professor of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, and Director, the Duke Islamic Studies Center, Duke University

Istanbul: Religion, Culture and Urban Life
Banu Gökarıksel, Associate Professor of Geography and Global Studies, UNC- CH

The Future of Istanbul and Tehran
A panel discussion with our speakers

TIME & COST
9:00 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Saturday, October 1, 2016. The tuition is $65 or register for all 3 Dialogue seminars for $150.00. A meal will not be offered with this seminar.

For information about lodging click here.

Co-Sponsored by the General Alumni Association.

For information about GAA discounts and other scholarships available to Humanities Program participants, click here.

Register for this seminar at this link. Please contact the Program in the Humanities at (919) 962-1544 with questions about this seminar, or visit http://humanities.unc.edu/programs/adventures-in-ideas/great-cities-in-the-middle-east-tehran-and-istanbul/.

LOCATION: FedEx Global Education Center, room 1005

Co-sponsored by the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations.


Perceptions, Realities and the Changing Dynamics of U.S.-Pakistan Relations: A Lecture by Dr. Saeed Shafqat

August 9, 2016 ” />

Time: Wednesday, August 10 at 3:00 pm. Venue: FedEx Global Education Center, 4th Floor, UNC-Chapel Hill

U.S.- Pakistan relations are a painfully enduring relationship. Over the decades, these nations have witnessed high and low points several times yet endured and not broken. The ‘terms of endearment’ have undergone changes during each decade. For example, former Secretary of State Hilary Clinton described US-Pakistan relations as ‘transactional’ and not based on mutual trust. Some scholars have declared Pakistan an ‘unworthy ally.’ Others have announced the ‘end of illusions’, yet others claim that India-Pakistan has been ‘de-hyphenated’ in the U.S. South Asia strategy and yet India-Pakistan relations remain a major concern for the U.S. Why? To borrow a Chinese expression, this is the ‘New Normal’ in U.S.-Pakistan relations.

Focusing on three dimensions–geo-strategic interests, the global war on terrorism and a changing regional environment–policy makers in the two countries are constantly trying to re-position and adapt on issues of mutual concern. These sensibilities are manifested through the ongoing Strategic Dialogue between the two countries, despite hiccups. Interpreting patterns of ‘high’ and ‘low’ points, Dr. Saeed Shafqat will identify the changing contours and future direction of U.S.-Pakistan relations.

Dr. Saeed Shafqat is Professor & Founding Director at the Centre for Public Policy and Governance, Forman Christian University, Lahore. For Spring 2012, he was Visiting Professor of South Asian Studies at the College of Wooster, Ohio. He has been Quaid-I Azam Distinguished Professor and Chair (March 2001- May 2005) of the Pakistan Center at the School of International Affairs and Public Policy (SIPA), Columbia University and remained Adjunct Professor at SIPA until 2009. As Adjunct Professor at SIPA (2005-2009), Columbia University, Dr. Shafqat taught two online courses: IAU 8615 Globalization and Transformation of Religion and Politics in South Asia, and IAU 8582 Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan: Changing dynamics of religion, politics, security and Great Power Interactions. His research articles on culture, politics, security and various aspects of public policy and governance, demographic change and civil service reform on Pakistan have been published in journals of international repute.  His books include: Political System of Pakistan and Public Policy (1989) Civil- Military Relations in Pakistan (1997), Contemporary Issues in Pakistan Studies (2000, 3rd edition) and New Perspectives on Pakistan: Visions for the Future (Karachi: Oxford University Press, 2007). He has also co-authored two Monographs: Saeed Shafqat & Raheem ul Haque, Pakistan, Afghanistan and U.S. Relations: Implications for the Future (Lahore: CPPG, 2011) and Saeed Shafqat & Maheen Saleem Khosa, Electoral Politics and Electoral Violence in 2013 Elections: The Case of Punjab (Lahore: CPPG, 2014)

This event is sponsored by Wake Forest University, North Carolina Central University and the Carolina Asia Center.


PlayMakers Repertory Company: ‘Draw the Circle’

August 10, 2016 ” />

PlayMakers kicks off PRC2 season with world premiere of ‘Draw the Circle’ in Kenan Theater

Funny, moving story of a Muslim-American family dealing with their daughter’s gender transition brings a human face to today’s headlines

PlayMakers Repertory Company opens its 2016-2017 Season with the world premiere of Mashuq Mushtaq Deen’s “Draw the Circle” directed by Chay Yew. Deen will perform his one-man show Aug. 24-28 as the first presentation in PlayMakers’ new PRC² second stage series.

“Draw the Circle” is the funny, deeply moving story of a bewildered immigrant Muslim-American family coming to terms with a child who defies their expectations and redefines their capacity for unconditional love when that child transitions from one gender to another. The play, called an “effortless blend of comedy and intense intimacy” (Stephen Shelley, Artistic Director of Brooklyn’s BEAT Festival), is a uniquely personal look at the human quest for understanding in an age of shifting expectations and identities.

Deen, an award-winning actor/playwright, has been described as “an artist whose work reflects and imagines the national cultural identity.” New York Theatre Workshop (NYTW) named him a 2050 Fellow. His plays have been produced and/or developed by New Dramatists, The Public Theater, NYTW, InterAct Theatre, Page 73, Ma-Yi Theater Company, Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, BEAT Festival and Berkshire Fringe as well as colleges and universities across the country.

“In a series devoted to opening dialogue about the important issues of our time, and at a moment when we as a community must confront questions of intolerance, Deen’s ‘Draw the Circle’ explores the complex humanity at the heart of one transgender story, expanding our empathy through a 21st century understanding of inclusivity,” says PlayMakers Producing Artistic Director Vivienne Benesch. “This compassionate look at a family’s struggle with their child’s gender transition will be followed each night by a facilitated discussion with our audience, Deen, and various scholars and community leaders. We hope to welcome a broad spectrum of theater-goers to this show and responsibly entertain, educate and perhaps even transform them through art and storytelling.”

Performances of “Draw the Circle” will be at 7:30 p.m. nightly and 2 p.m. Aug. 28 in the Elizabeth Price Kenan Theatre in the Center for Dramatic Art on Country Club Road. Ticket prices start at $15 and may be purchased at www.playmakersrep.org or by calling (919) 962-7529.

 

About PlayMakers

Based in UNC’s College of Arts and Sciences, PlayMakers is the professional theater in residence at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Carolinas’ premier resident professional theater company. New York’s Drama League has named PlayMakers one of the “best regional theatres in America.”

PlayMakers contact (for press information, interviews, photos and art): Connie Mahan, (919) 962-5359, cmahan@email.unc.edu.


Focus Group: Provide Feedback on new Khayrallah Center Exhibit, “The Lebanese in America”

August 15, 2016 ” />

Location: 332 Withers Hall, NC State University – 101 Lampe Dr., Raleigh, NC

The Khayrallah Center is organizing a small focus group to provide feedback on their new traveling exhibit “The Lebanese in America.” This small, portable exhibit will travel throughout the country to heritage and non-heritage communities to detail the story of the Lebanese community in America from 1870 through today. It narrates the journeys of Lebanese immigrants as they struggled to maintain their identity and strove to become Americans. It relates how they have enriched and shaped the country through their hard work to raise families and build communities even as they faced challenges.

Be the first to see this new exhibit by volunteering to be a part of the focus group providing invaluable feedback! The group will meet in the Khayrallah Center conference room and refreshments will be provided.

Parking is free on campus after 5 PM. If you are interested in contributing or have questions, please contact Bearta Alchacar at brpowel3@ncsu.edu.


Challenging Racism and Islamophobia Forum

August 15, 2016

A forum will be organized at As-Salaam Islamic Center to explore the roots of Islamophobia or anti-Muslim discrimination.

This forum will explore the following questions:
How does Islamophobia operate in society?
What are the links between Islamophobia and racism?
How to understand the relationships between immigrant Muslims and African American Muslims?
How can Muslims counteract racism and Islamophobia?

This forum is free and open for all. Snacks will be provided. The forum will include speeches and break-out session. Email at info@muslimsforsocialjustice.org or call 919-355-8026 for more questions. Learn more at the following Facebook page:https://www.facebook.com/events/149969755438988/, or contact Manzoor Cheema at manzooracheema@gmail.com.


Pakistan Independence Day Celebration

August 15, 2016 ” />

When: Sunday, August 14, 5:30 – 7:30pm
Where: Moore Square Park, 200 S Blount St, Raleigh, NC 27601

Pakistan day – Aug 14th, 2016 (Pakistan Fest)

We will have a very exciting commemorative day in the heart of Raleigh. All community members are invited to join us to enjoy this very festive day. Please bring snacks for your family and also to share with your friends.

Suggested Food items:
Sandwiches
Chips
Soft drinks and water
Fruit (Mangoes will be great)
Pizza
Cake with Pakistani Flag
Cookies
Cup Cakes (Green and white)
Middle-Eastern food too!
Also, please bring small Pakistani flags

See more information on the Facebook Page here: https://www.facebook.com/events/149630102140589/


A Conversation with the Director of National Intelligence, James R. Clapper

August 15, 2016 ” />

You are cordially invited to a public presentation featuring The Honorable James R. Clapper, DNI. For more information and to register, please click here. Registration is not required, nor will it guarantee you a seat at this event. However, it will permit us to notify you of any last minute changes in the program, and enable us to assess interest.

Date and Time: September 27 at 6:00 PM.
Location: K
oury Auditorium, Kenan Flagler Business School, UNC-CH campus

James R. Clapper has served as Director of National Intelligence August 9, 2010. He leads the Intelligence Community, serving as the principal intelligence advisor to the President.  During the course of a long and distinguished career, he served in the U.S. Armed Forces, as a civilian, and as an intelligence officer. His 32 year career in the military started as a rifleman in the U.S. Marine Corps, and culminated as a lieutenant general in the U.S. Air Force and Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency.  He served two combat tours during the Southeast Asia conflict and held many intelligence-related positions, to include Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence at U.S. Air Force Headquarters during Operations Desert Shield/Desert Storm and Director of Intelligence for three war-fighting commands: U.S. Forces Korea, Pacific Command, and Strategic Air Command. After retiring from the military, he worked for six years in industry, where his business focus was the Intelligence Community. He returned to the government in 2001, serving for five years as Director of the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency and for three as Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence.

Please contact Carolyn Pumphrey, Ph.D., Triangle Institute for Security Studies, IC CAE in Intelligence and Security Studies at 919-619-0547 or pumphrey@duke.edu with questions.

Sponsored by: Triangle Institute for Security Studies


“Women in the Hebrew Bible and Ancient Israel,” a Lecture by Susan Ackerman

August 18, 2016 ” />

SUSAN ACKERMAN, (Dartmouth College), will discuss how the Hebrew Bible is a book that was primarily written by men, for men, and about men, and thus the biblical text is not particularly forthcoming when it comes to the lives and experiences of women. However, this lecture looks at the ways in which scholars have been able to combine a careful reading of the biblical text with anthropological and archaeological data, and with comparative evidence from the larger biblical world, to reconstruct certain features of ancient Israelite women’s culture.

PLEASE NOTE WE ARE STARTING OUR COMMUNITY LECTURES AT 7:00 PM THIS YEAR.
LOCATION: Friday Center

***

The Hebrew Bible is a book that was primarily written by men, for men, and about men, and thus the biblical text is not particularly forthcoming when it comes to the lives and experiences of women. Other evidence from ancient Israel—the society in which the Hebrew Bible was generated—is also often of little use. Nevertheless, scholars have been able to combine a careful reading of the biblical text with anthropological and archaeological data, and with comparative evidence from the larger biblical world, to reconstruct certain features of ancient Israelite women’s culture.

These features include fairly comprehensive pictures of women’s lives as wives and childbearers within Israel’s patrilineal and patrilocal kinship system and of women’s work within the economy of a typical Israelite household. Because the Bible is deeply concerned with religious matters, many aspects of women’s religious culture can also be delineated, even though the Bible’s overwhelmingly male focus means that specific details concerning women’s religious practice must be painstakingly teased out of the biblical text. The Bible’s tendency to focus on the elite classes of ancient Israelite society likewise means that it is possible to sketch a reasonable portrait of the experiences of elite women, especially the women of the royal court.

***

Susan Ackerman is the Preston H. Kelsey Professor of Religion, and Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and of Jewish Studies at Dartmouth College. Before joining the Dartmouth faculty in 1990, Profesor Ackerman taught at the University of Arizona and at Winthrop College in South Carolina. Professor Ackerman’s A.B. is also from Dartmouth, in Religion; she earned a Masters of Theological Studies from Harvard Divinity School, with a specialization in Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, and a Ph.D. in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations from Harvard, with a specialization in Biblical History and Semitic Philology.

 

All events in the fall semester are free and open to the public, no reservations or tickets required. Event updates can be found on the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies web site and social media sites. More event informationcan be found here: https://jewishstudies.unc.edu/events. Please email jewishstudies@unc.edu or call 919-962-1509 with questions.

Sponsored by the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies


Urdu Majlis Meeting: Life and Works of Poet Ibn-e-Insha

August 18, 2016 ” />

Please join us Friday August 26, 2016 for the next monthly meeting of Urdu Majlis, the Triangle’s Urdu Literary Forum. This Urdu Majlis will concentrate on the life and works of poet Ibn-e-Insha (1927-1978). Ibn-e-Insha was a Pakistani Urdu poet, humorist, travelogue writer and newspaper columnist. Along with his poetry, he was regarded as one of the best humorists of Urdu.

WHERE: Room 1009, FedEx Global Education Center,
301 Pittsboro Street, UNC, Chapel Hill, NC 27516

WHEN: Friday, August 26, 2016

7:00 Ibn-e-Insha
8:00 Original poetry etc. by participants
9:00 Refreshments
9:30 Building closes
Please arrive on time as a courtesy to others.

See DIRECTIONS below.  Free parking is available under the building. Participants are invited to bring refreshments to share.

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. This event is co-sponsored by the Carolina Asia Center and the South Asia Section of the UNC Dept. of Asian Studies.

Urdu Majlis is an intellectual endeavor with no political or religious affiliations.

For more information call:
Afroz Taj  919-851-1119 / 919-962-1060
Seema and Ashraf Faruqi 919-596-4792


Persian Lecture Series: Commentary on Gulshan-i Rāz with Professor Mohsen Kadviar

August 19, 2016 ” />

Location: FedEx Global Education Center, Room 1005

We invite you to join us for a five-part lecture series on Gulshan-i Rāz, featuring commentary by Professor Mohsen Kadviar. Gulshan-i Rāz of Maḥmūd ibn ʻAbd al-Karīm Shabistarī (died 1320) is a classic Persian mystical text. Please note that this event is in Persian and open to all who speak Persian or love Persian mystical literature.

The third season of our Persian lecture series focuses on the exploration of Gulshan-i rāz (“The rose garden of the secret”), the most eminent poetry work of a renowned 14th century Persian Sufi poet and gnostic, Mahmoūd Shabestarī, one of the most prominent scholars of the Islamic mysticism.  His masterpiece, Gulshan-i rāz, is a response to the questions posed to him by Amīr Hussain Harawi concerning Sufi metaphysics and the intricacies of mystical doctrine. Each poetry section is preceded by a question (su’āl) to which he provides an answer to either in the form of theory (qā’ida) or illustration (tamthīl).  His poetry, very concisely, sheds light on a broad range of topics in Islamic mystical thought for which it has received a great deal of attention over centuries and numerous commentaries ever since.

Professor Mohsen Kadivar is an Iranian philosopher and research professor of Islamic Studies at Duke University. For more information, please contact Sam Aghamiri at sam.aghamiri@gmail.com.

Sponsors: The Iranian Circle of Culture and Wisdom, UNC Persian Studies, and the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations


Oil-Gotten Gains: Petrodollars, Abscam, and Arab American Activism, 1973-1981: A Lecture by Dr. Salim Yaqub

August 19, 2016 ” />

Thursday, September 15 at 3:30 PM
Location: 4003 Global Education Center, UNC-CH

In the 1970s, soaring oil prices provided huge revenues to oil producing Arab countries, which, together with private Arab companies and individuals, invested billions of dollars in the U.S. economy. The influx of Arab petrodollars drew mixed reactions from Americans. Some feared that wealthy Arabs were “buying up America” and gaining control over the nation’s political, economic, educational, and cultural institutions. Others welcomed Arab investment as a boon to the U.S. economy and to global stability. Petrodollars also played a key role in Arab American history. Demeaning portrayals of oil-rich Arabs in media and government discourse—reaching a crescendo in the FBI’s “Abscam” sting opererations of 1978-1980—goaded Arab Americans to adopt more organized methods of combating anti-Arab stereotypes. Salim Yaqub draws on his new book, Imperfect Strangers: Americans, Arabs, and U.S.-Middle East Relations in the 1970s, to explore the complex legacy of Arab petrodollars in American life.

Salim Yaqub is Professor of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and Director of UCSB’s Center for Cold War Studies and International History. He is the author of Containing Arab Nationalism: The Eisenhower Doctrine and the Middle East (University of North Carolina, 2004) and of several articles and book chapters on the history of U.S. foreign relations, the international politics of the Middle East, and Arab American political activism. His second book, Imperfect Strangers: Americans, Arabs, and U.S.-Middle East Relations in the 1970s, was published by Cornell University Press in September 2016.

Sponsored by the Departments of Asian Studies and History; the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations and The Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies.

Free and open to the public. Please contact Nadia Yaqub (yaqub@email.unc.edu) for more information.


Turkey Today Lecture Series: “Beyond National Unity: The Future of Pluralist Democracy in Turkey” with Dr. Aykan Erdemir

August 22, 2016 ” />

AUGUST 30 AT 6:00 PM-7:30 PM | FedEx Global Education Center, Nelson Mandela Auditorium

Turkey has been scene to mass demonstrations of national unity in the aftermath of the abortive coup of July 15. Some see this new spirit of consensus as an opportunity to move beyond the polarization that dominated the Turkish political scene for the last decade. Others see these spectacles of conformity to be an alarming move toward authoritarianism and one-man rule. What are the implications of the ongoing reshuffle in politics for the future of pluralist democracy and rule of law in Turkey? What are the opportunities and challenges that this new era presents for Turkey’s dissidents, ethnic and religious minorities, LGTBI and other vulnerable communities?


Dr. Aykan Erdemir is a former member of the Turkish Parliament (2011-2015) who served in the EU-Turkey Joint Parliamentary Committee, EU Harmonization Committee, and the Ad Hoc Parliamentary Committee on the IT Sector and the Internet. As an outspoken defender of pluralism, minority rights, and religious freedoms in the Middle East, Dr. Erdemir has been at the forefront of the struggle against religious persecution, hate crimes, and hate speech in Turkey. He is a founding member of the International Panel of Parliamentarians for Freedom of Religion or Belief, and a drafter of and signatory to the Oslo Charter for Freedom of Religion or Belief (2014) as well as a signatory legislator to the London Declaration on Combating Antisemitism.

On April 27, 2016, Dr. Erdemir was awarded the Stefanus Prize for Religious Freedom in recognition of his advocacy for minority rights and religious freedoms.

After completing his BA in International Relations at Bilkent University, Ankara, Dr. Erdemir received an MA in Middle Eastern Studies and PhD in Anthropology and Middle Eastern Studies from Harvard University, where his doctoral dissertation was entitled, “Incorporating Alevis: The Transformation of Governance and Faith-based Collective Action in Turkey.” He also worked as a doctoral fellow at Hauser Center for Nonprofit Organizations at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and a research associate at the University of Oxford’s Center on Migration, Policy and Society. In March 2015, Dr. Erdemir was awarded a distinguished fellowship at the Oxford Centre for the Study of Law and Public Policy.

Dr. Erdemir has taught at Bilkent University in Ankara, and Middle East Technical University, where he also served as Deputy Dean of the Graduate School of Social Sciences and graduate director of the German-Turkish Masters in Social Sciences.

For more information, please contact Lily Herbert at lherbert@live.unc.edu or visit http://europe.unc.edu/event/beyond-national-unity-the-future-of-pluralist-democracy-in-turkey/.


This event is the first in a series of three entitled “Turkey Today” to be held at UNC during Fall Semester 2016. This talk will be hosted by CES, TAM and the EURO major, funded by the European Union, and co-sponsored by the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations & the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies.


A Staged Reading of The Hour of Feeling by Mona Mansour

September 2, 2016 ” />

For the first time, we’re collaborating with our friends at PlayMakers Repertory Company in celebration of our Sacred/Secular: A Sufi Journey project. We’ll be presenting two readings of two plays at Historic PlayMakers Theatre this season that depict the tension between the sacred and the secular in contemporary Muslim life. Their stories give us an entry into the complexities of navigating everyday life amidst a rapidly changing cultural landscape.

 

Tickets just $10

buynow_260px

 

In 1967, as the map of the Middle East is about to be redrawn, Adham, a promising young Palestinian scholar specializing in English poetry, sets off to London with his new wife Abir to deliver a potentially career-changing lecture on Wordsworth. He’s eager to make a splash and leave his homeland behind, while she still feels bound to fulfill her responsibilities to family and tradition. When violence erupts back home, the young couple’s marriage is seriously tested, and Adham struggles to reconcile his ambitions with the pull of family and home.


PRCatCPA is a collaboration between Carolina Performing Arts and PlayMakers Repertory Company.  PRCatCPA presents two readings of plays that depict the tension between the sacred and the secular in contemporary Muslim life. The protagonists in these plays are torn between their cultural and religious heritage and the demands of modernity and assimilation. Their stories give us an entry into the complexities of navigating day-to-day life amidst a rapidly changing cultural landscape. Each reading will be followed by a discussion led by PlayMakers Repertory Company’s Producing Artistic Director Vivienne Benesch and the creative team.


A Staged Reading of The Who and the What by Ayad Akhtar

September 2, 2016 ” />

For the first time, we’re collaborating with our friends at PlayMakers Repertory Company in celebration of our Sacred/Secular: A Sufi Journey project. We’ll be presenting two readings of two plays at Historic PlayMakers Theatre this season that depict the tension between the sacred and the secular in contemporary Muslim life. Their stories give us an entry into the complexities of navigating everyday life amidst a rapidly changing cultural landscape.

 

Tickets just $10

buynow_260px

Zarina, a talented Pakistani-American writer, has put her personal life on hold to finish her novel about women and Islam. That is, until her conservative father signs her up for an Islam-based dating website and introduces her to Eli, a young convert to the faith. But when Zarina’s family discovers the controversial theme of her novel, their long-simmering conflicts over progressive and traditional beliefs explode. This ferociously funny and eloquent play by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Disgraced takes an unflinching look at the contradictions that make us who we are.


PRCatCPA is a collaboration between Carolina Performing Arts and PlayMakers Repertory Company.  PRCatCPA presents two readings of plays that depict the tension between the sacred and the secular in contemporary Muslim life. The protagonists in these plays are torn between their cultural and religious heritage and the demands of modernity and assimilation. Their stories give us an entry into the complexities of navigating day-to-day life amidst a rapidly changing cultural landscape. Each reading will be followed by a discussion led by PlayMakers Repertory Company’s Producing Artistic Director Vivienne Benesch and the creative team.


Turkey, the EU and the U.S. – Disaster Looming?

September 2, 2016 ” />

Panelists: Ambassador W. Robert Pearson (former U.S. Ambassador to Turkey), 

Dr. Erhard Busek (former Vice-Chancellor of Austria), and 

Dr. Gönül Tol (founding director of the Center for Turkish Studies, Middle East Institute in D.C.)

Dramatic developments in Turkish, European Union and U.S. relations in 2016 have led to serious crises between Turkey and its two traditionally strongest Western supporters.  After the July 15 attempted coup, Turkey is demanding that the U.S. extradite to Turkey the alleged mastermind of the attempt, Fethullah Gulen, an Islamic cleric living in exile in the U.S.   Ankara also is warming ties with Russia’s leader, Vladimir Putin, raising fears of weakening NATO and aligning Turkey more closely with Moscow.  Towards the E.U., Turkey is threatening to stop enforcing its refugee agreement with the EU, highlighting the specter of renewed unregulated immigration to Europe, new tensions within the EU on dealing with refugees, and human tragedy as a result of the Syrian war.  Are these three critical international players doomed to failure in resolving their differences, and, if not, could diplomacy help steer the relations in a better direction?

Event is free and open to the public.  Light refreshments will be served.

Parking: The most convenient visitor parking lot is at the Bryan Center. Information about the Bryan Center lot and other visitor parking can be found here.

Information about accessible parking for visitors with disabilities can be found here.

Sponsored by the Duke University Center for International & Global Studies and the Duke University Council for European Studies.


A Master Class for Graduate Students in Sources for Modern Middle East History

September 2, 2016 ” />

As part of the Jara’id 2.0 workshop we are offering a seminar discussion about using 19th-century Arabic periodicals in modern historical research for graduate students who intend to use Arabic sources. This occasion shall be a “master class” type discussion with Prof. Hala Auji (American University of Beirut), Omar Cheta (Bard College), Mona Hassan (Duke) and Adam Mestyan (Duke) who will present examples from their own experience.  The students will learn of both methodological and practical challenges and solutions in order to process information in historical research.

If there are enough interested students the seminar would take place 14 November, Monday, 10-12, in Rubinstein 249, Duke Library, Duke University. Please write to Professor Adam Mestyan directly if you are interested in participating in this event.  He can be reached at the following email address: adam.mestyan@duke.edu.


‘What’s Going On?’: Islamophobia & the Triangle Community

September 2, 2016 ” />

 

http://www.quailridgebooks.com/event/wgo3-islamophobiatc

 

Quail Ridge Books
Now at North Hills, 4209-100 Lassiter Mill Road
Open Mon – Sat 9 am – 9 pm; Sun 10 am – 6 pm

‘What’s Going On?’: Islamophobia & the Triangle Community

Quail Ridge Books invites the community to come out and talk about the social interaction problem in our community. We launched our discussions a year ago, but folks can join in any time.  On Wednesday, Sept. 7, at 7 pm, we will have our ice storm-postponed part of the conversation, What’s Going On? Taking on Diversity in Raleigh:

 Islamophobia in the Triangle Community

Our town meeting features:

  • Dr. Carl Ernst, Professor of Religious Studies, UNC-CH
  • Imam Mohamed AbuTaleb, Islamic Association of Raleigh
  • Imam Khalid Shahu, Apex Mosque
  • Samia Serageldin, Egyptian-born novelist, essayist and editor

Clay Stalnaker, moderator

Our motivation to sponsor these conversations was sparked by a book.  NCSU professor Rupert Nacoste’s Taking On Diversity: How We Can Move From Anxiety To Respect helped us see and better understand the multiple diversity issues with which our nation is struggling. With the themes of that book as a guide, our series of conversations will usually be co-moderated by Rupert Nacoste and Clay Stalnaker.

Event date: 

Wednesday, September 7, 2016 – 7:00pm

Event address: 

North Hills

4209-100 Lassiter Mill Road

Raleigh, NC 27609

 


Study Abroad 101 Info Session: Africa and the Middle East

September 6, 2016 ” />

Thinking about studying abroad? Interested in Africa or the Middle East? Come to this general information session in the FedEx Global Education Center, Room 2010 to learn more about study abroad opportunities with a focus on programs in these regions. For more information, please contact abroad@unc.edu.


Combating Threats at Home & Abroad: A Conversation with Department of Homeland Security Jeh C. Johnson

September 6, 2016 ” />

For the 15th anniversary of 9/11, U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh C. Johnson will discuss threats at home and abroad. As the fourth Secretary of Homeland Security, Johnson will discuss counterterrorism and homeland security policy in the context of the changing nature of the current conflict. Johnson has also served as General Counsel to the Department of Defense and the Department of the Air Force and as an Assistant United States Attorney. For more information, contact Aly Breuer at aly.breuer@duke.edu.

Sponsored by the Duke University Program in American Grand Strategy, the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security, the Sanford School of Public Policy, the Political Science Department, and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies.


Reel Women Directors of the Middle East Film Festival: Women Without Men

September 6, 2016 ” />

The first film in the semester-long “Reel Women Directors of the Middle East Film Festival,” Women Without Men is a 2009 drama from Iran. Against the tumultuous backdrop of Iran’s 1953 CIA-backed coup d’etat, the destinies of four women converge in a beautiful orchard garden, where they find independence, solace, and companionship. In Persian with English subtitles.

Sponsored by the Duke University Middle East Studies Center (DUMESC), the Screen Society, the Program in the Arts of the Moving Image (AMI), AMES Presents, and Duke University Libraries. For more information, contact mideast@duke.edu or click here.


Imperfect Strangers: Americans, Arabs, and U.S.-Middle East Relations in the 1970s with Dr. Salim Yaqub, UC-Santa Barbara

September 6, 2016 ” />

Salim Yaqub argues that the 1970s were a pivotal decade in U.S.-Arab relations—a time when Americans and Arabs became an inescapable presence in each other’s lives and perceptions, and when each society came to feel profoundly vulnerable to the political, economic, cultural, and even physical encroachments of the other. Throughout the seventies, these impressions aroused striking antagonism between the United States and the Arab world. Over the same period, however, elements of the U.S. intelligentsia grew more respectful of Arab perspectives, and a newly assertive Arab American community emerged into political life. These patterns left a contradictory legacy of estrangement and accommodation that continued in later decades and remains with us today. A light lunch will be served and this event is free and open to the public.  Contact Julie Maxwell (julie.maxwell@duke.edu) for more details or visit here.

Co-sponsors: Duke Islamic Studies Center, Duke History Department


Public Lecture: “Strangers in Europa: Migrants, Terrorists, Refugees” with Professor Aamir Mufti, UCLA

September 6, 2016 ” />

Aamir R. Mufti is a Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of California, Los Angeles, and has recently published Forget English! Orientalisms and World Literatures (Harvard University Press, 2016). His research interests focus on a range of forms of inequality in the contemporary world and how they impede the possibilities for historically autonomous action by social collectivities. His work also explores the possibilities of critical knowledge of these societies within the dominant practices of the modern humanistic disciplines.

Sponsored by the Duke University Middle East Studies Center, the Novel Project at Duke, the Program in Literature, and the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute. For more information, contact mideast@duke.edu or click here.

 


Persian Art Center in Carolina: Iranian Poetry

September 6, 2016 ” />

The program will begin with a social from 4-4:30, followed by a welcome and introduction by Amir Rezvani. The speaker for this event is Mr. Amin Azhdar. His presentation on Iranian poetry will be followed by discussion from 6-6:30pm. From 6:45-7:30 , there will be live music and poetry readings from your favorite poets.  The event will end with an open forum regarding planning for the future from 7:30-8:00pm.

The Persian Poetry Group in Chapel Hill honors, respects and promotes freedom of speech and expression. For more information, please call 919-259-0959 or visit Kodoom.com.


For Students: Research Opportunity Information Session

September 6, 2016 ” />

For Students Only: Join this Research Opportunity Information Session Funded by the U.S. Department of Defense and organized by the Laboratory for Unconventional Conflict Analysis and Simulation (LUCAS).
Location: Gross Hall 230. Duke University

Syria is locked in a Civil War that shows no signs of ending. Lebanon, Iraq, and Yemen are also once again war zones. Iran, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Russia, and the U.S. are deploying resources into this strategic landscape to achieve strategic goals. The Resources and Resiliency project, funded by the Minerva Initiative of the Office of the Secretary of Defense, conducts fundamental research into the strategic decision making of these actors—why and how are they deploying resources for strategic effects and to what ends?

LUCAS is seeking social and computer science researchers/analysts. Working with LUCAS will enable you to gain experience applying your knowledge and skills while working with a great team that contributes directly to national security. While computer science researchers develop their skills by applying them to a complex and interesting problem set, social science researchers apply classroom knowledge and learn some basic computational skills. As the security environment increases in complexity U.S. government and industry entities are seeking analysts with experience in big data, open source intelligence mining and processing, and techniques such as agent-based modeling, social network analysis, semantic and sentiment analysis, or geospatial analysis.

Working with LUCAS will build your skill-set, help you build a portfolio of deliverables for potential employers, and train you in the next generation of computational tools.

Opportunities: There are a few ways to participate. There are a number of paid research positions, there are opportunities for internships with leading national security agencies through LUCAS, and there may be opportunities for course credit as well.

How to contact us: please email war10@duke.edu with a current copy of your resume and a brief letter of introduction that tells us something additional about your background, why this opportunity is right for you.


Visual Language in the Landscapes of Urban Senegal | Prof. Fiona McLaughlin

September 7, 2016 ” />

Fiona McLaughlin, of the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures at the University of Florida, will present a talk on Senegal in relation to Youssou N’Dour’s performance of Sufi music. McLaughlin’s primary areas of research in linguistics are the phonology, morphology and sociolinguistics of Wolof, Pulaar and Seereer-Siin, three Atlantic (Niger-Congo) languages spoken in Senegal. Her current areas of investigation are language contact in urban Senegal, reduplication and ideophones and information structure. A secondary interest is Islam and popular culture, especially popular music, in Senegal.

This event is free and open to the public. Please contact Dr. Victoria Rovine for more information.



“After ISIL: Stability and Spillover” Conference

September 9, 2016 ” />

The purpose of this one-day conference is to help the Special Operation Forces (SOF) community’s strategic planning and forward posturing by accessing academic expertise. The underlying premise of this event is that defeating ISIS militarily, retaking Mosul, Raqqa, and other territory in Iraq and Syria, will not completely eliminate them as a threat. Therefore, the intellectual motivation for this conference is this question: what are the greatest challenges and opportunities to peace and stability after the military defeat of ISIS? To further focus this question we propose one panel on the after effects in Iraq and Syria, a second panel on the impact of foreign fighter flow from Iraq/Syria through Turkey into Europe, with a focus on Southeastern Europe (the Balkans), and lastly a panel focused on the effects of these scenarios on U.S.-Russia relations. For more information, please visit https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9k0giP6YJLQU3Y5RVUwVkw1MTEtVG1tcUEyYUl0YUVpT3Rz/view.

WHEN: 2 December 2016, 8:15 a.m.
WHERE: Richard White Lecture Hall, 1308 Campus Dr, East Campus. Durham, NC 27705

Sponsored by: U.S. Army Special Operations Command, the Laboratory for Unconventional Conflict & Simulation, Triangle Institute for Security Studies, and the Program in American Grand Strategy at Duke.


Tar Heel Beginnings: Global Hangout

September 10, 2016 ” />

Meet new friends from North Carolina and around the world in this highly interactive, fun-filled fest! This event includes international music, appetizers, activities and prizes. The prizes include two tickets to see Hossein Alizadeh in a masterful interpretation of classical Persian music. For more information, please contact the Writing Center at 919-962-7710.


Persian Lecture Series: Commentary on Gulshan-i Rāz with Professor Mohsen Kadviar

September 10, 2016 ” />

We invite you to join us for a five-part lecture series on Gulshan-i Rāz (“The rose garden of the secret”),featuring commentary by Professor Mohsen Kadviar. Please note that this event is in Persian and open to all who speak Persian or love Persian mystical literature. Gulshan-i rāz is the most eminent poetry work of a renowned 14th century Persian Sufi poet and gnostic, Mahmoūd Shabestarī, one of the most prominent scholars of the Islamic mysticism.  His poetry, very concisely, sheds light on a broad range of topics in Islamic mystical thought. Professor Mohsen Kadivar is an Iranian philosopher and research professor of Islamic Studies at Duke University. For more information, please contact Sam Aghamiri at sam.aghamiri@gmail.com.

 

Sponsors: The Iranian Circle of Culture and Wisdom, UNC Persian Studies, and the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations

 


Book Discussion: Forget English! Orientalisms and World Literatures with Professor Aamir Mufti, UCLA

September 10, 2016 ” />

Aamir Mufti will discuss his latest book, Forget English! (Harvard University Press, 2016), and how he has scrutinized claims made on behalf of world literature by its advocates. Mufti is a Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Sponsored by the Duke University Middle East Studies Center, the Novel Project at Duke, the Program in Literature, and the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute. For more information, click here. To RSVP to this event, please email mideast@duke.edu.


This Whole Election is About me: An American Muslim Perspective on 2016 with Haroon Moghul

September 10, 2016 ” />

Haroon Moghul is a commentator and broadcaster who has appeared on all major media networks and has been published at the Washington Post, TIME, CNN, Guardian, Foreign Policy, Haaretz and Boston Review. He’s the author of a novel, The Order of Light, and an upcoming memoir, How to be a Muslim: An American Story. Haroon has been a Fellow at the Center on National Security at Fordham Law, the New America Foundation and is currently with the Shalom Hartman Institute. As President of Avenue Meem, he makes short films about religion and identity. Moghul will share his perspective on the 2016 election.  Contact Lucia Constantine lucia.constantine@duke.edu for more details or visit here.

 

Sponsor: Duke Office of Civic Engagement


Early Lebanese American Writers and the Cultural Politics of Orientalism, a lecture by Wail S. Hassan

September 10, 2016 ” />

In his book, Immigrant Narratives: Cultural Translation in Arab American and Arab British Literature, Hassan draws upon postcolonial, translation, and minority discourse theory to investigate how key writers have described their immigrant experiences, acting as mediators and interpreters between cultures, and how they have forged new identities in their adopted countries. This lecture will focus on the very different work of three major writers from the early twentieth century, Ameen Rihani, Kahlil Gibran, and Abraham Rihbany. For more information, please contact the Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies, 919-515-5058.


Immigration, Terrorism, and Islam: A Panel Discussion

September 10, 2016 ” />

In this current presidential election, the question of Islam and terrorism has at the forefront of issues for both candidates and many Americans. However this clashing narrative between Muslim Americans and “American” Americans can often be uninformed. Join Dr. Anna Bigelow, Dr. Akram Khater and Dr. Charles Kurzman as they lead a panel discussion and Q&A with the audience about Islam, immigration and terrorism and the rhetoric of the 2016 elections. For more information, please contact the Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies, 919-515-5058.


Turkey: The 2016 Coup Attempt and its Aftermath and Implications

September 10, 2016 ” />

A coffee hour will be held from 4:30-5:30 pm before the talk. Please join us in the atrium of the FedEx GEC to meet and speak with Professor Kasaba.

A failed coup d’état in Turkey on July 15, 2016 made world headlines and left hundreds dead or injured. Nearly a month later, tens of thousands of military personnel, journalists, judges, prosecutors, professors, university administrators and teachers have been fired or forced to resign and some have been arrested. Continuing instability in Turkey has serious implications for the region, for U.S. policy in the Middle East, and Turkey’s relations with the U.S. In this lecture and discussion, Professor Reşat Kasaba will provide an overview of the political upheaval of this summer and put it in the context of modern Turkish history and politics.


Reşat Kasaba is Stanley D. Golub Chair of International Studies and the Director of The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington, Seattle. He earned his PhD in Sociology in 1986. His research on the Ottoman Empire and modern Turkey has covered economic history, state-society relations, migration, ethnicity and nationalism, and urban history with a focus on Izmir. He is the author of over fifty articles and eight books, including A Moveable Empire: Ottoman nomads, Migrants, and RefugeesCambridge History of Turkey, Vol. IV: Turkey in the Modern World (edited), andRethinking Modernity and National Identity in Turkey (Coedited with Sibel Bozdoğan). His work continues to examine the social and economic history of the Ottoman Empire and modern Turkey and state-society relations in the Middle East from a historical perspective. He is currently writing a book Turkey: A Modern History for Cambridge University Press.

Sponsored by Carolina Center of the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, UNC Center for European Studies, Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, TAM and the EURO major, with funding from the European Union.


Don’t Make Me Laugh: The Role of Humor in Turkish Society: Melike Eğilmezler Boylan

September 10, 2016 ” />

For the past 35 years, Turkish humor has evolved and responded in creative ways to the socioeconomic conditions of the times. Drawing on inspiration from witty and absurdist folk traditions, Turkish humorists have used satire, irony and class symbolism to confront everything from rising conservatism and corruption to the July 2016 failed coup d’état attempt. Melike Eğilmezler Boylan is a Turkish sociologist specializing in contemporary satire. Her first book, Güldürme Beni! Mizah Üstüne Ciddi Söyleşiler (Don’t Make Me Laugh! Serious Conversations About Humor) is a collection of interviews with legendary Turkish writers, directors, actors, stand-up comedians and cartoonists, exploring their role in society. Eğilmezler Boylan’s research interests include exploring the tension between repression and freedom of expression, humor traditions in Muslim societies and documenting creative social change. This event is the third in a series of three entitled “Turkey Today” to be held at UNC during Fall Semester 2016. For more information, please visit here.

Sponsored by Carolina Center of the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, UNC Center for European Studies, Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, TAM and the EURO major, with funding from the European Union.


Imperfect Strangers: Americans, Arabs, and U.S.-Middle East Relations in the 1970s with Dr. Salim Yaqub, UC-Santa Barbara

September 10, 2016 ” />

The UNC Chapel Hill Bookstore will host Salim Yaqub for a reading from his book, Imperfect Strangers: Americans, Arabs, and U.S.-Middle East Relations in the 1970s (Cornell University Press, 2016), on Friday, Sept. 16 at 3 pm at the Bull’s Head Bookshop. The book explores the complex legacy of Arab petrodollars in American life. In the 1970s, soaring oil prices provided huge revenues to oil producing Arab countries, which, together with private Arab companies and individuals, invested billions of dollars in the U.S. economy, and the influx of Arab petrodollars drew mixed reactions from Americans.

Salim Yaqub is Professor of History at UC-Santa Barbara, and Director of UCSB’s Center for Cold War Studies and International History.

Sponsored by: The UNC Departments of Asian Studies, American Studies and History, the Center for Global Initiatives, the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, and the Center for African Studies.


An Evening of Sufi Music with Oruç Güvenç

September 14, 2016 ” />

Dr. Güvenç is a Turkish Sufi musician, a clinical psychologist and music therapist, whose albums such as Ocean of Remembrance present a palette of musical textures through vocals, saz, ney, oud, and rebab, producing a hypnotic effect.

Free and open to the public – parking will be available at no charge adjacent to the Nasher Museum. the concert will take place in the museum auditorium. For more information, please contact Julie Maxwell at julie.maxwell@duke.edu.

Co-Sponsors Center for European Studies, Religions and Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, Asian and Middle East Studies, Duke University Middle East Studies Center, Carl Ernst, Duke Islamic Studies Center, Graduate Student Association of Iranians at Duke University (GSAID)


Migration Studies Social

September 17, 2016

Learn about programs, research, study abroad opportunities and courses at UNC Chapel Hill related to regional and global migration studies.

When: 5:30pm Wednesday, September 21

Where: The FedEx Global Education Center, 301 Pittsboro Street, 4th floor rooftop

Light refreshments served

 

Sponsored by:

The Latino Migration Project, the Institute for the Study of the Americas, The Center for Global Initiatives, the Graduate Certificate in Global Transmigration Studies, The Curriculum in Global Studies, UNC Study Abroad in Guanajuato Mexico, APPLES Global Course Guanajuato, the Refugee Health Initiative, The Working Group on Migration, Gender and Health, and the Department of Anthropology

 

RSVP: Hannah Gill, hgill@email.unc.edu


Carolina Global Photography Competition Submission Deadline

September 17, 2016 ” />

The submission period has opened for the 17th annual Carolina Global Photography Competition. This amateur competition is open to all students, faculty, alumni and staff of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and showcases Carolina’s global activity, educational opportunities, research and service work. The competition closes September 30, 2016.

Each photographer may submit up to three photos. Photos may represent any world region, and there is no restriction on the time period in which the photograph was taken. Entries will be judged on artistic merit and context. Special consideration will be given to images that are distinctive and embrace new perspectives.

Grand prizes will be awarded to first, second and third place winners.

  • Chancellor’s Choice will be awarded to a photo the Chancellor finds globally relevant and distinctive.
  • Regional spotlights will be selected by area studies centers and units housed in the FedEx Global Education Center.
  • Thematic spotlights will be awarded for photos that incorporate various themes prioritized by the competition committee.

Additional information on submission guidelines and competition rules can be found on the Carolina Global Photography Competition website.

The Carolina Global Photography Competition is a collaborative effort of the following UNC units: African Studies Center; Carolina Asia Center; Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations; Center for European Studies; Center for Global Initiatives; Center for Slavic, Eurasian and East European Studies; Curriculum in Global Studies; Global Relations; Global Research Institute and the Food Theme Steering Committee; Institute for the Study of the Americas; International Student and Scholar Services; and the Study Abroad Office.


UNICEF Speaker Series: Lucia Mock Munoz de Luna

September 18, 2016 ” />

UNICEF at Carolina is having its first Speaker Series event this coming Monday September 19th at 6:30 pm in Dey Hall Room 313 with guest speaker Lucia Mock Munoz de Luna!

Ms. Mock earned her master’s degree from Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education and is now a doctoral student at UNC School of Education. She will be speaking about the Syrian refugee crisis and her time as a counselor at the American Community School at Beirut. Additionally, she’ll be discussing her work at the Women’s Learning Center in Burj el Barajneh, where she taught English and provided trauma training to educators there. Ms. Mock will also be speaking about the impact she witnessed first-hand of education as a tool for social justice.

Sponsored by UNICEF at Carolina. Please contact unicef.unc@gmail.com for more information.


W@TC – What Duke’s Collections Can Do for You – Sean Swanick, Duke Middle East and Islamic Studies Librarian

September 18, 2016 ” />

This presentation will provide an overview of Duke’s Middle East and Islamic Studies collections; what has been collected, what will be collected and how collections are developed, particularly in conjunction with UNC. There will also be some discussion about the practical aspects of making collections available and the processes involved. Sean Swanick is the Middle East and Islamic Studies Librarian. He previously worked at McGill University as the Islamic Studies Liaison Librarian. He holds a MA in Middle East history from the University of Exeter and a Masters in Library and Information Studies from Dalhousie University. He’s travelled and studied in Egypt, Oman, Syria and Tunisia and his research interests include book history, codicology and paleography. A light lunch will be served. Contact Julie Maxwell julie.maxwell@duke.edu for more details or visit here.

Sponsors: John Hope Franklin Center and the Duke Islamic Studies Center


Lebanese Artist, Lena Merhej: Public Talk

September 18, 2016 ” />

Between September 26 and 30, Lebanese artist Lena Merhej will visit NC State to offer workshops to students, display her art work, and give public talks on the state of the arts in Lebanon and the Middle East.

You are cordially invited to attend the public talk and exhibit of our inaugural Lebanese artist in residence, Ms. Lena Merhej.
Place: Talley Ballroom, Talley Student Center, NC State
Date: Thursday, September 29
Time: 6 PM

Parking is available at the Reynolds Coliseum parking deck off Dunn Street.

Merhej (PhD) is a visual storyteller and expert in graphic narration. She taught at the American University of Beirut and the Lebanese American University, and now teaches at the Lebanese International University. She is the co-founder and the editor in chief of the comics’ magazine, Samandal. For more information, please contact the Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies, 919-515-5058.


Islamophobia Forum: Unpacking the Sources of Anti-Muslim Fear and Hostility

September 19, 2016 ” />

Please join the Parr Center for Ethics for a discussion of the multiple causes and effects of anti-Muslim fear and hostility in the United States. Our panel will include Juliane Hammer, Charles Kurzman, Timothy Marr, and Melody Moezzi, with Joseph Kennedy moderating. Instead of giving separate talks, our panelists will have a wide-ranging discussion on the issue. We will then open the floor for audience participation as well. This event is free and open to the public.


Dr. Oruç Güvenç: An Evening of Sufi Music

September 19, 2016 ” />

Thursday, October 6, 2016 | 6:00-7:30pm
Gerrard Hall, UNC Chapel Hill

Dr. Güvenç is a Turkish Sufi musician, a clinical psychologist and music therapist, whose performances present a variety of musical textures through vocals, saz, ney, oud, and rebab, producing a hypnotic effect. Dr. Güvenç will give a performance of Sufi music at UNC-Chapel Hill, accompanied by commentary about his music and therapy work.

This event is free and open to the public.
Please contact harver@email.unc.edu for more information.

Co-Sponsors: Center for European Studies, Religions and Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, Duke Department of Asian and Middle East Studies, Duke University Middle East Studies Center, UNC Department of Religious Studies, Duke Islamic Studies Center, Graduate Student Association of Iranians at Duke University (GSAID)

 


Interfaith Series: Who are Our Muslim Neighbors?

September 19, 2016 ” />

This October, the St. Francis of Assisi Church will host an interfaith series that will attempt to bring people together for respectful encounter, dialogue, and increased understanding. The goal is to move closer to the possibility of peace in our communities and world.

Join the St. Francis of Assisi Church for “Who are Our Muslim Neighbors,” a conversation with members of the Muslim community in the Triangle: Mohammad Abu-Salha, MD, Krista Bremer, and Farris Barakat. With Special Guest Host: Bishop Michael Burbidge, Catholic Bishop of the Diocese of Raleigh.

There is a story of St. Francis visiting an important Muslim leader in Egypt during the Crusades in the thirteenth century. This story has shaped the congregation’s orientation to peace and dialogue in an increasingly fractured world. St. Francis of Assisi Church aims to create a space in which the larger faith and civic communities can deepen understanding and respect about Islam and the Muslim world through learning and dialogue.

The greater community is invited to the series. If you have any questions related to this interfaith series, contact Director of Justice and Peace Trevor Thompson, trevor.thompson@stfrancisraleigh.org.

Image: St. Francis and the Sultan By: Br. Robert Lentz, OFM TRINITY: Religious Artwork & Icons www.trinitystores.com


Interfaith Series: St. Francis as Model of Dialogue

September 19, 2016 ” />

This October, the St. Francis of Assisi Church will host an interfaith series that will attempt to bring people together for respectful encounter, dialogue, and increased understanding. The goal is to move closer to the possibility of peace in our communities and world.

Join the St. Francis of Assisi Church for “St. Francis as Model of Dialogue” – A conversation with Fr. Michael Calabria, OFM – Director of the Center for Arab and Islamic Studies at St. Bonaventure University.

There is a story of St. Francis visiting an important Muslim leader in Egypt during the Crusades in the thirteenth century. This story has shaped the congregation’s orientation to peace and dialogue in an increasingly fractured world. St. Francis of Assisi Church aims to create a space in which the larger faith and civic communities can deepen understanding and respect about Islam and the Muslim world through learning and dialogue.

The greater community is invited to the series. If you have any questions related to this interfaith series, contact Director of Justice and Peace Trevor Thompson, trevor.thompson@stfrancisraleigh.org.

Image: St. Francis and the Sultan By: Br. Robert Lentz, OFM TRINITY: Religious Artwork & Icons www.trinitystores.com


Workshop: How to Defeat Islamophobia

September 21, 2016 ” />

Performance can help us to examine substantive issues of the day and can be a catalyst for dialogue and learning. The Sacred/Secular: A Sufi Journey project for example, offers a variety of performances and events that reveal the plurality of Muslim identity and refute monolithic thinking.

In a time of increasing Islamophobia, there is an urgent need to address misrepresentations of Islam and Muslims as well as identify means of intervention. That’s why Carolina Performing Arts is collaborating with the Movement to End Racism and Islamophobia (MERI) to host their workshop titled: How to Defeat Islamophobia. The workshop draws on the personal experiences of Muslims and people of color, and will use images, videos, and interactive exercises to examine the following topics:

– What is Islamophobia?
– Address common myths and assumptions about Islam and Muslims
– Understand how we are unintentionally participating
– Identify how we can interrupt our own and others’ participation
– Define action steps

Event Details:
September 28 from 2-5pm at Gerrard Hall, complimentary and open to the public. Please
RSVP here. For more information, please see https://www.carolinaperformingarts.org/the-overture/workshop-how-to-defeat-islamophobia/.

For more information, please contact Aisha Anwar, Engagement Coordinator for Special Projects at aanwar@email.unc.edu.


The Future of NATO as a Force for Global Stability: post-Brexit & post-Turkish Coup: Admiral James Stavridis

September 21, 2016 ” />

Admiral James Stavridis, former supreme allied commander of NATO and former commander of the U.S. Southern Command, will speak at Duke University on Tuesday, Nov. 1. His talk, “The Future of NATO as a Force for Global Stability: post-Turkish Coup and post-Brexit,” is free and open to the public. The talk will be the first lecture in a new speaker series at Duke on the challenges of global governance funded by the Ambassador Dave and Kay Phillips Family International Lectureship. Stavridis is currently dean of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. During his 30 years with the United States Navy, he served as commander of the U.S. Southern Command and the U.S. European Command, and as the NATO supreme allied commander. He has written several books and articles on national security and foreign policy, and his views are often sought out by the media. For more information, please contact Amanda Frederick at amanda.frederick@duke.edu.

Stavridis’ talk is hosted by the Duke University Center for International and Global Studies, the Duke University Program in American Grand Strategy, the Sanford School of Public Policy, and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies.


Screening & Discussion of I Bring What I Love

September 21, 2016 ” />

Join us for a screening of I Bring What I Love, a portrait of pop star Youssou N’Dour and his efforts to record Egypt, an album in response to negative perceptions of Islam. This event is free and open to the public.

More info about Youssou can be found here: https://www.carolinaperformingarts.org/ros_perf_series/sufi-songs-youssou-ndour/


“Veiled Threats: Women and Jihad” presented by Dr. Mia Bloom

September 26, 2016 ” />

The Department of History and Political Science at Meredith College will host Mia Bloom, internationally renowned expert on terrorism and extremism and author of Bombshell: Women and Terror. Dr. Bloom will be giving a lecture titled “Veiled Threats: Women and Jihad.” The lecture will be followed by a question and answer period. Reception to follow. The lecture and reception are both free and open to the public.

Presented by the Meredith College Department of History and Political Science with support from The Kenan Fund.

at Jones Chapel | Meredith College


Never Can I Write Of Damascus: History, Memory, and Shared Life in Iraq and Syria

September 26, 2016 ” />

Gabe Huck and Theresa Kubasak will share historical analysis and ethnographic insights from their new book, Never Can I Write of Damascus: When Syria Became Our Home. Beginning in 1999, the educators witnessed what the severe UN sanctions did to every aspect of Iraqi life. When the US moved from sanctions to invasion and occupation, they made a critical decision to move from New York to Damascus in 2005 and to live and teach where a million Iraqis had sought safety. Over the next seven years, Huck and Kubasak became part of the multi-faith fabric and the intellectual life of Damascus. In this talk they will share their experience, what they came to hold dear, and why they came back to the US.

Sponsored by: UNC Student Government, Islamicate Graduate Student Association, Department of Religious Studies, Department of History, Department of Asian Studies, Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, and Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies.

For more information, please contact Katie Merriman at kmerri@live.unc.edu.

Location: Room 1005, FedEx Global Education Center


Catherine or Body of Passion : An Ethnographic Documentary, Screening and Q & A

September 26, 2016 ” />

Emma Aubin-Boltanski, the social anthropologist from the École des hautes études en sciences sociales, Paris, will present her most recent ethnographic documentary [in Arabic with English/French sub-titles], with Q & A to follow. Aubin-Boltanski works on religious practices of the Middle East, and especially interrelations between Muslim and Christian communities. In recent years, she has turned to the tool of film, and made several ethnographic documentaries. This latest, Catherine Body of Passion, filmed in Lebanon, is representative of her work pursued once, in Syria, and now in Palestine, and Lebanon.

 

Sponsored by Center for French and Francophone Studies, Africa Initiative, Cultural Anthropology, Forum for Scholars and Publics, and Romance Studies. For more information, contact Helen Solterer at hsolt@duke.edu or click here.


Iraqi Cultural Night

September 26, 2016 ” />

Iraqi Cultural Nights will feature a performance of Iraqi music and dance. Food will be served. More information to come.

Please visit the event’s Facebook page for more information here.

 


Reel Women Directors of the Middle East Film Festival: Where Do We Go Now?

September 26, 2016 ” />

The second film in the semester-long “Reel Women Directors of the Middle East Film Festival, “Where Do We Go Now?” is a 2011 comedy/drama from Lebanon. It was the winner of the People’s Choice Award at the Toronto International Film Festival.  The film will be introduced by Professor Didem Havlioğlu (AMES) with a Q&A to follow. Christians and Muslims lived peacefully together for years in this small Lebanese village, but animosities begin to build among the men as a result of slights and misunderstandings. The women of the village conspire to avert sectarian strife though a series of harebrained plans, none of which succeeds in slowing down the escalating spiral of violence. When tragedy strikes, the women find themselves driven to make a deeply personal sacrifice for the sake of peace. In Arabic, Russian, and English with English subtitles. For more information, contact mideast@duke.edu or click here.

 

Sponsored by the Duke University Middle East Studies Center (DUMESC), Screen/Society, the Program in the Arts of the Moving Image (AMI), AMES Presents, and Duke University Libraries.


Graduate School Info Session: International Affairs

October 2, 2016 ” />

Interested in international affairs? Attend this information session on graduate programs in the field. Representatives from Columbia University, Johns Hopkins University, Georgetown University, Princeton University, and Tufts University will be present. These representatives will discuss academic programs, admission requirements, financial aid, and career opportunities with graduate degrees in international affairs. For more information, please contact the Curriculum in Global Studies at nancys@email.unc.edu.


New Exhibit: “Migration Narratives”

October 2, 2016 ” />

Migration Narratives, a new exhibition at the FedEx Global Education Center, highlights the local impacts of global migration. The Carolina Connections portion offers a uniquely local perspective with interviews and photographs from three UNC system students, all Syrian refugees who have resettled in North Carolina. Their narratives touch on each individual’s journey to Carolina and the impact the state has had on them. The exhibition will be on display from Sept. 5 to Dec. 9, 2016. Please contact Ingrid Smith at ingrid.smith@unc.edu for more information. 

This exhibition is sponsored by UNC Global with support from the African Studies Center, Carolina Asia Center, Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, Center for European Studies, Center for the Study of the American South, Center for Global Initiatives, Curriculum in Global Studies, Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, Global Relations and Institute for the Study of the Americas.


Persian Lecture Series: Commentary on Gulshan-i Rāz with Professor Mohsen Kadviar

October 2, 2016 ” />

We invite you to join us for a five-part lecture series on Gulshan-i Rāz (“The rose garden of the secret”)featuring commentary by Professor Mohsen Kadviar. Please note that this event is in Persian and open to all who speak Persian or love Persian mystical literature. Gulshan-i rāz is the most eminent poetry work of a renowned 14th century Persian Sufi poet and gnostic, Mahmoūd Shabestarī, one of the most prominent scholars of the Islamic mysticism.  His poetry, very concisely, sheds light on a broad range of topics in Islamic mystical thought. This is the third session. Professor Mohsen Kadivar is an Iranian philosopher and research professor of Islamic Studies at Duke University. For more information, please contact Sam Aghamiri at sam.aghamiri@gmail.com.

 

Sponsors: The Iranian Circle of Culture and Wisdom, UNC Persian Studies, and the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations


Lunch and Learn

October 2, 2016 ” />

Too often we find ourselves listening to second-hand sources that encourage the creation of walls and segregation within our delicate society. Unfortunately, this narrative can sometimes erode the bridges and partnerships between family and friends to create a world none of us would want to live in. As such, the Islamic Association of Raleigh cordially invites you to a unique open house event – our first annual Lunch and Learn. The community is welcome to break bread and sample a host of cultural Islamic foods and desserts while discussing the day-to-day beliefs and effects of this abnormal narrative on a Muslim-American. This lunch will be followed by watching the mid-day prayer, and will capped off by a keynote speech presented by our imam, Muhammed AbuTaleb.

For more information, please visit the event’s Facebook page here.


MSA Live: The Legacy of Our Three Winners

October 2, 2016 ” />

We invite you to join the UNC Muslim Students Association for a night of remembrance and reflection in MSA Live: The Legacy of Our Three Winners. With us for the night is prominent civil rights activist Linda Sarsour and Farris Barakat, the brother of Deah Barakat and Executive Director of Project Lighthouse, who will be describing their vision for honoring the legacies of Our Three Winners.

Linda Sarsour is a working woman, community activist, and mother of three. Ambitious, outspoken and independent, Linda shatters stereotypes of Muslim women while also treasuring her religious and ethnic heritage. Currently she is the Advocacy and Civic Engagement Coordinator for the National Network for Arab American Communities (NNAAC), a network of 22 Arab American organizations in 11 states and the District of Columbia, and she conducts trainings across the country on the importance of civic engagement in the Arab and Muslim American community. She also serves as the Director of the Arab American Association of New York, a social service agency serving the Arab community in NYC. Linda’s strengths are in the areas of community development, youth empowerment, community organizing, civic engagement and immigrants’ rights advocacy.

Farris Barakat has spent the last two years countering Islamophobia by carrying on his brother’s legacy after he was killed in a shooting in Chapel Hill on Feb. 15, 2015. Farris not only fulfilled his brother’s service project of bringing dental care to rural Turkey, but surpassed the original $14,000 goal by raising over $500,000. Currently, he is setting up The Light House, a non-profit that pays tribute to Deah Barakat, his brother. The Light House serves as an incubator for growing projects.

Dinner will be provided.

$10 for all students within the Triangle Area.

$15 for non-students.

Purchase tickets at: http://www.etix.com/ticket/p/6477109/msa-livethe-legacy-of-our-three-winners-119947-chapel-hill-carolina-union?cobrand=CarolinaUnion

Read more about Linda Sarsour in the New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/09/nyregion/linda-sarsour-is-a-brooklyn-homegirl-in-a-hijab.html

More information about this event…


The Call to Islam and Early Warning Systems: ​The Art of Overhearing in Bangladesh

October 2, 2016 ” />

This paper uses the natural disaster warning systems in place in Bangladesh as a springboard for considering how poor people, specifically those living on shifting islands or chars in the River Jamuna, receive and assess information from centers of expertise and authority.  The mode of “overhearing” emerges as the most productive means of anticipating and materializing threats and promises, ranging from floods to relief.  At the same time these very channels of communication bring in other sounds and messages from diverse domains of life, including the political and the theological.  These suggest a highly elaborated art of overhearing or listening in on infrastructure.
Naveeda Khan is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Johns Hopkins.  Her previous work was on religious difference and everyday sociality in Pakistan.  She wrote Muslim Becoming: Aspiration and Skepticism in Pakistan (2012) and edited Beyond Crisis: Re-evaluating Pakistan (2010).  Her recent work is on riverine life in the context of climate change in Bangladesh.

Entangled Soviet and Central Asian Discourses on Gender, Youth, and Consumption, 1955-1985: Kathryn Dooley

October 10, 2016 ” />

In the decades after World War II, Soviet Central Asia became home to a nascent consumer culture fueled by the consumption of a wide array of traditional-style goods, Soviet-produced novelties, and global imports. The Soviet state’s fear of a rising tide of consumer acquisitiveness and “bourgeois” mentalities created a situation in which Central Asian tradition and ethno-cultural specificity could be reframed as potentially healthy influences, bolstering Soviet values in their struggle against excessive consumerism and dissolute youth culture. This presentation will look at discussion in the Uzbek- and Kyrgyz-language satirical press that influenced central and local discourses on gender, ethnicity, and generational differences, providing a back door through which elements of Central Asian “traditionalism” could permeate the Soviet public sphere in the region. Kathryn Dooley is a Ph.D. student in the Department of History at Harvard University. She specializes in the history of Soviet Central Asia, with a focus on consumption, gender, and social and cultural dimensions of nationality in the region.

 

The Carolina Seminar: Russia and Its Emipres, East and West is co-sponsored by the Carolina Seminar Program, the UNC Department of History, and the Duke Council for European Studies. For more information, please visit here.


Public Lecture: “Turkey’s Improbable Journey to Modernity: State, Society and Identity” with Professor Reşat Kasaba, University of Washington

October 10, 2016 ” />

Turkey is living through one of the most difficult periods in its history. Having survived a terrifying coup attempt, the country is trying to deal with multiple internal and external crises with tools and institutions that are weak and becoming weaker by the day. Academia and the press, two pillars that would normally protect and reinforce democratic politics, are under attack by the government while the Kurdish conflict is on the verge of turning into a full-fledged civil war. While there are personalities and recent developments that have worsened the situation in Turkey, there are also longer term factors that need to be considered in order to understand properly why Turkey finds itself so compromised and vulnerable at this point.

Sponsored by Duke University Middle East Studies Center and the Duke University Council for European Studies. For more information, click here.

 


Public Lecture: “Gaming in support of the ME peace process” with Professor Rex Brynen of McGill University

October 10, 2016 ” />

Rex Brynen is Professor of Political Science at McGill University. In addition to his extensive work on peace, conflict, and Middle East politics, he is a serious game designer and senior editor of the conflict simulation website PAXsims (http://www.paxsims.org). For more information, contact Shai Ginsburg (shai.ginsburg@duke.edu).  Free and open to the public.  A light dinner will be served.

 

Sponsored by Duke’s Asian and Middle Eastern Studies Department.


Conference: The Middle East in Latin America

October 10, 2016 ” />

A symposium exploring Arab and Middle Eastern communities in Latin America — whether Muslim (Sunni, Shia), Jewish, Christian, or secular — in Brazil, Mexico, Colombia, and Argentina. We chart flows of migration and immigration across time and space, driven by commerce and politics, bringing languages, dialects, religions, and ethnicities into contact and new combinations. We bring together anthropologists, historians, political scientists, literary theorists, art critics, poets, converts, and filmmakers. The symposium looks at the convergences and divergences between two seemingly remote regions and cultures, with attention to allegiances forged across the Global South. We particularly examine the articulation of a radical politics across different political, cultural, and historical contexts: liberation theologies, feminism, decolonization, Marxism, and socialism. We pay special attention to the expression of these ideologies through not just political movements, but also art, music, media, film, literature, and poetry.

Speakers and respondents include Rodrigo Adem, Paul Amar, Lily Balloffet, Christina Civantos, miriam cooke, Patrick Duddy, Christine Folch, Kiah Glenn, Steven Hyland, Antonio de Jesus Lopez, John Tofik Karam, Anouar Majid, Walter Mignolo, Harold Morales, and Camila Pastor de Maria y Campos.

Sponsored by the Humanities Futures at the Franklin Humanities Institute, Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, Duke Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Duke Center for International Studies, Kenan Institute for Ethics-Religions and Public Life, Duke Islamic Studies Center, Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, and The Global Brazil Lab. For more information, click here.


Raleigh International Festival

October 10, 2016 ” />

The Raleigh international festival celebrates the many languages, cultures, and nations represented in North Carolina. Don’t miss three days packed with exhibits, performances, food and shopping! There will be several Middle Eastern cultures represented throughout the festivities. For more information, please visit here.


Jara’id 2.0: Indexing the Early Arabic Public Sphere | A Workshop and Events in Arabic Digital Humanities

October 14, 2016 ” />

Digital Humanities Talk: 11 November, Friday, 12:00-13:00, D106 LSRC

Workshop: 12 November 2016, Saturday, 9.00 – 14.00, Rubenstein 249

Seminar: 14 November Monday, 10-12, Rubenstein 249

Book talk: 14 November Monday, 1-3, Rubenstein 249

This digital humanities workshop brings together historians, librarians, literary scholars, and IT experts from the Middle East, Europe, and the US in order to discuss the 2.0 update and redesign of Jara’id – Chronology of Nineteenth-Century Arabic Periodicals. Jara’id is a digital platform and website which attracted experts from all over the world in the last five years and now it is time to extend and elevate the project to a next level. The program includes a talk in (Arabic) Digital Humanities and a master class seminar with invited experts on the historian’s use of early Arabic journals aimed at interested Duke/UNC/NCSU graduate students. Finally we finish with a book talk by Prof. Hala Auji (AUB) on book history with a focus on her recently published Printing Arab Modernity, 2016.

For more information and the program schedule, please visit https://sites.duke.edu/jaraid/.

Co-sponsored by Duke History Department, Duke University Libraries, Franklin Humanities Institute – Digital Humanities Initiative – Visualization Friday Forum, Duke Islamic Studies Center, Asian and Middle Eastern Studies Department, Duke Middle East Center, Duke University Center for International & Global Studies, Religions & Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke, and Adam Mestyan


Flourishing the Negev Desert

October 15, 2016 ” />

Flourishing the Negev Desert
Tuesday, October 18, 7:00pm
Global FedEx, Room 1005

An evening about Israeli local produce, cultivation in the desert, and innovative irrigation systems. Israeli snacks will be served. Please note that this event is open to UNC students only. For more information, contact Hanna Sprintzik, Hebrew Lecturer: hannasp@email.unc.edu.

This event is part of “The Israeli Cultural Salad Israeli Popular Food & Immigration” series.

These events are made possible by the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies and a grant from Jimmy and Susan Pittleman, and co-sponsorship from the Department of Asian Studies, the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, and the Israel Center at the Jewish Federation of Durham- Chapel Hill.


Two Ways Immigration & Food Experiences

October 15, 2016 ” />

Tuesday, November 15, 7:00pm
Global FedEx, Room 1005

Israeli community members will share their experiences with Israeli and multicultural food. Student presentations on Israeli food will be showcased and an Israeli dinner will served. This event is open to UNC students only.

Please note that this event is open to UNC students only. For more information, contact Hanna Sprintzik, Hebrew Lecturer: hannasp@email.unc.edu.

This event is part of “The Israeli Cultural Salad Israeli Popular Food & Immigration” series.

These events are made possible by the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies and a grant from Jimmy and Susan Pittleman, and co-sponsorship from the Department of Asian Studies, the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, and the Israel Center at the Jewish Federation of Durham- Chapel Hill.


Film Screening: In Search of Israeli Cuisine

October 15, 2016 ” />

Location: Varsity Theater, 123 E Franklin St.

A film screening with Director Roger Sherman. This event is open to UNC students and the general public.

In Search of Israeli Cuisine is a portrait of the Israeli people told through food. The feature-length documentary puts a face on the culture of Israel, profiling chefs, home cooks, vintners, and cheese-makers drawn from the cultures that make up Israel today. A rich and human story of the people emerges. Learn more about the film here: http://www.israelicuisinefilm.com/. Watch the trailer here: http://www.israelicuisinefilm.com/trailer.

This event is part of “The Israeli Cultural Salad Israeli Popular Food & Immigration” series. For more information, contact Hanna Sprintzik, Hebrew Lecturer: hannasp@email.unc.edu.

These events are made possible by the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies and a grant from Jimmy and Susan Pittleman, and co-sponsorship from the Department of Asian Studies, the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, and the Israel Center at the Jewish Federation of Durham- Chapel Hill.


Solo Performance of ‘ud Music: Issa Boulos

October 16, 2016 ” />

Please join the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies for a concert of ‘ud music on Saturday evening featuring Palestinian-American musician and composer Issa Boulos. This solo performance will include excerpts from Boulos’ extended work al-Hallaj (2000), a series of composed Sufi poems penetrating the philosophy and tragic ending of Abu al-Mughith al-Husayn Ibn Mansur al-`Hallaj. This performance is part of a multidisciplinary conference on “Islam and Religious Identity: The Limits of Definition” on Oct. 14-16 at UNC.

This conference has received the generous support of several organizations. Please click here for a list of sponsors.


Explaining the Rise of Modern Science: A Connective History?

October 16, 2016 ” />

In his recent study, The Rise of Modern Science Explained: A Comparative History, Floris Cohen argues that three modes of nature-knowledge – realist mathematical, kinetic corpuscular and face-facting experimental – combined to produce modern science. Cohen sees these as transformations of earlier European traditions. This talk traces them to three outside influences on Renaissance Europe – the computational techniques of the Indian number system, the Arabic optics of Ibn al-Haytham, and the flow of mechanical technologies from China.

This event is co-sponsored by Global Asia Initiative and the Department of History, Duke University.


Bridge Panel Discussion: Peace in an Age of Terror

October 16, 2016 ” />

In a world worried about terror – acts of violence with political ends – how is it possible to live in peace? A Duke Chapel “Bridge Panel” conversation takes up the question of what spiritual, political and communal resources are available to seek peace in an age of fear. The panelists include Professor Valerie Cooper, associate professor of Black Church Studies at Duke Divinity School; Professor Stanley Hauerwas, Gilbert T. Rowe Professor Emeritus of Divinity and Law; and Professor Omid Safi, director of Duke’s Islamic Studies Center and a professor of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies. This event is free and open to the public. For more information, click here.


Re-Framing Global Studies: Oceans, Islands, and Impact

October 16, 2016 ” />

Using Pacific Studies as her entry point, Dr. Kahn will demonstrate the importance of rethinking binaries, particularly the dichotomy of global and area studies, and will explore new ways to envision global studies and its impact. Based on “Framing the Global: Entry Points for Research” (Indiana University Press, 2014), she will share insights into global scholarship and its broader role in the internationalization of curricula and campuses. Dr. Khan is the Assistant Dean for Strategic Collaborations and Director of the Center of Study for Global Change at the School of Global and International Studies at Indiana University.For more information, please contact aiea@duke.edu or (919) 668-1928.

 

This event is sponsored by the Association of International Education Administrators headquartered at Duke University.


Can the Middle East Learn from Southeast Asia? A Comparative Analysis of Political Transitions in Volatile Regions | Book talk with authors Teresita Cruz-Del Rosario and James M. Dorsey

October 16, 2016 ” />

A book Launch talk with authors Teresita Cruz-Del Rosario and James M. Dorsey

Embroiled in vicious cross-border sectarian wars, the Middle East dominates daily headline news. Turmoil in the Middle East contrasts starkly with encouraging signs of democratic transition in Southeast Asia even if at times, it seems fragile as in Myanmar. The Philippines and Indonesia have completed their transition and developed relatively open but messy, flawed and highly contested political systems. Thailand’s authoritarian resurgence highlights the threat of democratic reversals. What accounts for these differences? This seminar will discuss three key factors: the impact of a civil society infrastructure or the lack thereof; the importance of coalitions between the military, civil society and the business community; and the significance of properly managing inter-ethnic relations. There are lessons to be learnt from transitions in Southeast Asia, but these have to be are treated with caution and consideration, given the different historical, social, political and economic context in the Middle East. Yet experiences in Southeast Asia and Tunisia demonstrate that transition in the Middle East and North Africa is possible and inevitable. The 2011 Arab revolts were the beginning of a torturous process of two steps forward, one step backward that could take up to a quarter of a century or more, as in Southeast Asia. The comparison of the two regions provides insights on how the process in the Middle East and North Africa can be moved forward. For more information, please visit https://igs.duke.edu/units-global-asia-initiative-events/speakers.

Teresita Cruz-del Rosario is Senior Research Fellow at the Asia Research Institute (ARI), National University of Singapore. She was previously an Associate Professor at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy and Senior Research Fellow at the Center on Asia and Globalisation. Her teaching experience has been in Development Policy, Social Movements, and Sociological/Anthropological Theory and Methods. She has a background in Sociology, Social Anthropology and Public Administration from Boston College, Harvard University, and New York University. Apart from peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters, she has authored the following books: “Lost in Transition: Comparative Political Transitions in Southeast Asia and the Middle East” (co-authored with James M Dorsey, Palgrave MacMillan 2016); “The State and the Advocate: Development Policy in Asia” (Routledge UK 2014) and an edited volume entitled “The Democratic Developmental State: North-South Perspectives” (forthcoming Ibidem Publishers). A fourth book is currently under preparation and is entitled “Vanished History: Recovering Pre-colonial Transnational Philippine History” (Hong Kong University Press 2018). Her current research interests are in the broad field of Arabia-Asia historical and sociological connections, religion and globalization, and comparative regional development.

James M. Dorsey is a senior fellow at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, co-director of the University of Würzburg’s Institute for Fan Culture, and the author of The Turbulent World of Middle East Soccer (link is external) blog, arecently published book (link is external) with the same title, and also just published Comparative Political Transitions between Southeast Asia and the Middle East and North Africa (link is external), co-authored with Dr Teresita Cruz-Del Rosario. His other forthcoming books include: China and the Middle East: Venturing into the Maelstrom (Palgrave MacMillan); Shifting Sands: Volatile Transitions in the Middle East and North Africa, Essays on Sports and Politics (World Scientific) and Creating Frankenstein: Saudi Arabia’s Export of Ultra-conservative Islam.


Persian Art Center in Carolina: Iranian Poetry (Part 2)

October 19, 2016 ” />

The program will begin with a social from 4-4:30, followed by a welcome and introduction by Amir Rezvani. The speaker for this event is Mr. Amin Azhdar. His presentation on Iranian poetry will be followed by discussion from 6-6:30pm. From 6:45-8:00, there will be live music and poetry readings from your favorite poets. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2QUFGAGr7Dw

The Persian Poetry Group in Chapel Hill honors, respects and promotes freedom of speech and expression. For more information, please call 919-259-0959 or visit Kodoom.com.

Location:
400 Oak Tree Drive (The Club House)
Chapel Hill, NC 27517

 


Migration Narratives Panel Discussion and Reception

October 21, 2016 ” />

Join us for a reception and panel discussion on Nov. 3 beginning at 5:30 p.m. to celebrate the exhibition, Migration Narratives, on display at the FedEx Global Education Center through the end of the year. The panel discussion will feature representatives from the projects highlighted in the exhibit. Project contributors featured in the discussion include Katy Clune ’15 M.A., representing Home in a New Place: Making Laos in Morganton, North Carolina and Carolina Connections; Zubair ’18 and Bahij ’17, current UNC students and former Syrian refugees featured in Carolina Connections. Hannah Gill, director of New Roots Latino Oral Histories, Laura Villa-Torres, bilingual outreach assistant for New Roots Latino Oral Histories, and Felicia Arriaga, doctoral candidate at Duke University, will represent New Roots/Nuevas Raíces: Voices from Carolina del Norte. The discussion will be moderated by Niklaus Steiner, director of the Center for Global Initiatives, whose research and teaching interests are immigration, refugees, nationalism and citizenship.

The panel will take place in the Florence and James Peacock Atrium at 6:15 p.m. Beginning at 5:30 p.m., a reception and exhibition viewing will take place prior to the panel discussion. This event is free and open to the public. Parking is available in the McCauley Deck underneath the FedEx Global Education Center starting at 5 p.m. More information about the exhibition is available on the UNC Global website.


Nests of the Nu Ahong, Graduate Arts Exhibit Reception

October 21, 2016 ” />

2016-2017 Graduate Arts Fellow Salima Al-Ismaili is an Omani documentary artist working primarily in film and photography. Her previous documentaries explored issues of migration and displacement in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and Jordan. Al-Ismaili’s current focus explores the constructed and blurred assigned gender roles of women within religion, and the role of women’s leadership in Islam over time. She received her BSc in Journalism from Northwestern University in Qatar in 2013 and is pursuing an M.F.A. through the Duke University program in Experimental and Documentary Arts.  Click here or email Salima Al-Ismaili salima.al.ismaili@duke.edu for more information.

Sponsored by the Kenan Institute for Ethics.


“A True-to-Life Muslim? Knowledge of Islam & the Islamic World : The Case of Honorat Bovet in Pre-Modern France”

October 21, 2016 ” />

A joint talk with Emilie Picherot,  Université de Lille, and Helen Solterer of Duke University on the Case of Honorat Bovet in Pre-Modern France. An opportunity to delve into the debate – who knew what when? And to consider early chapters in this long, rich, conflicted encounter between cultures.

Sponsored by: Duke Center for French and Francophone Studies, and Duke Romance Studies. This event is free and open to the public. For more information, click here.


An Early Arabic Library : Manuscript 774 from France’s National Library with Emilie Picherot

October 21, 2016 ” />

“It is impossible to understand the particular relationship of France to the Arabo-Muslim world”, Picherot writes, “without returning again to the earliest tradition of studying Islam in the fifteenth through seventeenth centuries. The evidence of this practice is given concrete form by collections of Arabic manuscripts put together carefully by several scholars of the Arab world – and this long before Antoine Galland, and his contemporary Pétis de la Crois, the French scholars of the Arab world usually identified as the first.” This event is free and open to the public. For more information, click here.

Sponsored by: Francophone Digital Humanities Project, Center for French and Francophone Studies, and Duke Romance Studies.


Gett: The Trial of Vivian Amsalem

October 21, 2016 ” />

The third film in the semester-long “Reel Women Directors of the Middle East Film Festival,” Gett: The Trial of Vivian Amsalem is a 2014 Israeli-French drama. It was the nominee for Best Foreign Language Film at the Golden Globe Awards and the winner for Best Film in the Israeli Film Academy Awards in 2014. The film will be introduced by Professor Rachel Harris (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) with a Q&A to follow.

An Israeli woman (Ronit Elkabetz) seeking to finalize a divorce (gett) from her estranged husband finds herself effectively put on trial by her country’s religious marriage laws, in this powerhouse courtroom drama from sibling directors Shlomi and Ronit Elkabetz. In Israel, there is neither civil marriage nor civil divorce; only Orthodox rabbis can legalize a union or its dissolution, which is only possible with the husband’s full consent. Trapped in a loveless marriage, Viviane Amsalem has been applying for a divorce for three years but her religiously devout husband Elisha (Simon Abkarian), continually refuses. His cold intransigence, Viviane’s determination to fight for her freedom, and the ambiguous role of the rabbinical judges shape a procedure where tragedy vies with absurdity and everything is brought out into the open for judgment. In Hebrew, French, and Arabic with English subtitles.

Sponsored by the Duke University Middle East Studies Center (DUMESC), Screen/Society, the Program in the Arts of the Moving Image (AMI), AMES Presents, and the Center for Jewish Studies. For more information, contact mideast@duke.edu or click here.


Indigenous Affinities: A Comparative Study in Mayan and Palestinian Narratives: Amal Eqeiq

October 26, 2016 ” />

Amal Eqeiq is a native Palestinian born in the city of Al-Taybeh. She is an Assistant Professor of Arabic Studies and Comparative Literature at Williams College. Her research interests include: Modern Arab Literature and Popular Culture, Palestinian Studies, Feminism(s), Performance Studies, Translation, Indigenous Studies in the Americas, Literature of the Global South and Creative Writing. Amal is the receipien of several fellowships and awards, including a writing residency at  Hedgebrook: Women Authoring Change, a dissertation fellowship from the American Association of University Women and the Dean’s Medal in Humanities from the University of Washington. She is teaching regular classes on the multivalent and multidirectional encounters between the Arab world, Latin America and the Caribbean, and writing her first novel. She also keeps a Facebook Blog titled: “Diaries of a Hedgehog Feminist”.


UNC Global Passport Drive

October 26, 2016 ” />

Each year, hundreds of Carolina community members obtain or renew a passport at the annual Passport Drive hosted by UNC Global.

Officials from the U.S. Department of State are on campus once a year to accept passport applications and renewal applications and to answer questions from Carolina students, faculty, staff and their families. Application forms are available at the event, or can be downloaded from the U.S. State Department website.

You can have passport photos taken at the event for $7 (cash or check only) by UNC One Card office staff, or before the event at the UNC One Card Office. You are encouraged to get your photos before the event to avoid waiting. As of November 1st, Passport Services will no longer accept passport photos with eye glasses on. The applicant must remove their glasses. For additional requirements please review the photo requirements on the U.S. State Department website.

The 2016 UNC Global Passport Drive will take place 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. on November 15 and 16 in 4003 FedEx Global Education Center.

Please click on the appropriate link to determine the required application materials and payment.

For questions about the event, please email melissa_mcmurray@unc.edu.

Sponsors:

UNC Global
U.S. Department of State
UNC One Card Office


At the Crossroads of Work and War: New Mobilities for the Tunisian Precariat

October 26, 2016 ” />

This week, ICS will be sponsoring a workshop on an article in progress, entitled “At the Crossroads of Work and War:  New Mobilities for the Tunisian Precariat”–a chapter from Alyssa Miller’s thesis on Youth and Precarity in Post-Revolutionary Tunisia–as part of an event series on Youth, Democracy and Dissent.  Ellen McLarney will be responding to the paper, and lunch will be served for attendees.

This will be in workshop format so please RSVP to get a copy of the paper and read it in advance.  RSVPs should go to Samuel Shearer at samuel.shearer@duke.edu.


Politics and Violence in North Africa: Franco-Algerian Conflicts to the Arab Spring with Maximilian Owre

October 30, 2016 ” />

France and Algeria share a unique but painful history. From the French conquest in 1830 to Algerian independence in 1962, the relationship between subjects and citizens was complicated by the existence of a favored mixed-European minority (the “pieds-noirs”) in Algeria, and from the 20th century on, a large population of Algerians living in France. Join Maximilian Owre, Executive Director, Program in the Humanities and Lecturer in Historyas he explains the violent history of French colonialism in Algeria, the growth of Algerian nationalism, the War of Algerian Independence with its incidents of terrorism and torture, and the lingering resentments that still color France’s relations with the Muslim world and its minority citizens today. For more information, visit here: http://humanities.unc.edu/programs/weekday-programs/thursdays/.

 

Part I: Conquest, Confrontations, and Failed Reform, 1830-1945 

Part II: The Algerian War of Independence (1954-62) and its Legacies 

 

Registration is $55. Call 919-962-1544 to register, or register online. Sponsored by the Program in the Humanities.


Shi’ism: Commonalities & Misconceptions

October 30, 2016 ” />

The UNC Muslim Students Association is hosting a talk on Shia Islam. This event is meant to foster understanding, unity, and an appreciation of diversity within the Muslim community. We will be hosting Imam Mehdi Hazari from IABAT in Durham who will give a brief overview of Shia practices and answer your questions about Shi’ism. The presentation will be followed by an open discussion.

Here is the link to the facebook event page:
https://www.facebook.com/events/1775916212696247/#


Urdu Majlis

October 30, 2016 ” />

Urdu Majlis is the Triangle’s Urdu Literary Forum. This Urdu Majlis will concentrate on the life and works of the poet Meeraji (1912-1949) and feature original poetry by participants. For more information, please contact Afroz Taj at taj@unc.edu.
This event is co-sponsored by the Carolina Asia Center and the South Asia Section of the UNC Dept. of Asian Studies.


Film Screening: Love, Theft, and Other Entanglements with guest: Rami Alayan

October 30, 2016 ” />

Please join us for a film screening of the Palestinian film, “Love, Theft, and Other Entanglements,” with a discussion featuring the film’s co-producer Rami Alayan. Film synopsis: Mousa gets into the trouble of his life when he steals the wrong car. What he thought was an Israeli car and an easy way to make money in his impoverished Palestinian refugee camp turns out to be a load of misfortune when he discovers a kidnapped Israeli soldier in the trunk.

Sponsored by: the UNC Peace War, and Defense Department, Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, UNC Asian Studies Department, and the Center for Global Initiatives. For information: contact Doria Elkerdany: email: elkerdan@email.unc.edu.


Religion and Nationalism in Asia: Perspectives on Japan and the Muslim World

October 30, 2016 ” />

Today, appeals to nativism and political mobilization rooted in religious ideals are motivating systemic change and fomenting social upheaval across the world. In this one-day symposium, participants in two panels will present case studies from Japan, India, Pakistan, Turkey, and other Asian nations to discuss contentious and frequently under-examined dynamics that shape the region today. Discussion inspired by the detailed case studies offered by this symposium’s presenters will further inquiry into the religious underlay of nationalisms that are taking shape in Asia today. For more information and the schedule, please click here.

 

Cosponsored by the Global Asia Initiative, Asian/Pacific Studies Institute, North Carolina State University, Duke Islamic Studies Center.


Cancelled: Civility and Charisma in the Islamic Ecumene: A Socio-Historical Approach

October 30, 2016 ” />

**we are sorry to share that this event has been cancelled due to unforeseen circumstances

Armando Salvatore is Professor of Global Religious Studies and Keenan Chair of Interfaith Studies at McGill University, Montreal. From 2017 he will be a Professor at the Centre for Arab & Islamic Studies of the Australian National University, Canberra. His work as a social scientist explores the Islamic ecumene’s socio-political trajectories as well as transcultural interconnections with Western and Eastern traditions and civilizations. He has just published The Sociology of Islam: Knowledge, Power and Civility, and is editing The Wiley Blackwell History of Islam.

Sponsored by the Duke Islamic Studies Center and the Global Asia Initiative. For more information, contact julie.maxwell@duke.edu or click here.


Reel Women Directors of the Middle East Film Festival: Rachida

October 30, 2016 ” />

The fourth film in the semester-long “Reel Women Directors of the Middle East Film Festival,” Rachida is a 2002 drama from Algeria. The film was also the first 35mm full length feature directed by an Algerian woman that was released wide-spread. The film will be introduced by Professor Didem Havlioğlu (AMES) with a Q&A to follow.

The young teacher Rachida is teaching at a school in Algiers, when she is stopped in the street by a group of youths who demand she take a bomb and place it in the school. She recognizes one of the terrorists and refuses. Then she is cold-bloodedly shot and left for dead. Miraculously, she survives. To recover, she hides with her mother in a village far from the city. But terrorism is unavoidable there too. There are no safe havens in Algeria. In Arabic and French with English subtitles.

Sponsored by the Duke University Middle East Studies Center (DUMESC), Screen/Society, the Program in the Arts of the Moving Image (AMI), AMES Presents, and Duke University Libraries. For more information, contact mideast@duke.edu or click here.


Dabke Dance: Levantine Style

October 30, 2016 ” />

Dabke dance is a Levantine, Iraqi, Northern Saudi Arabian, and Kurdish circle dance for both males and females. The word دبكةis an Arabic word which presents the sounds that happen during the dance, it comes from the root د-ب-ب and the sound ‫دب

Click here for more information. Organized by: Duke Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Duke Middle East Studies Center, and Arabic Dining Table.


Riyaz Latif: Archiving Knowledge in Sacred Earth- Madrasa in the Marinid Chella

November 1, 2016 ” />

Join Medieval and Early Modern Studies at Carolina for a Dorothy Ford Wiley lecture presented by Riyaz Latif (History of Art, Vanderbilt). Professor Latif will present his lecture “Archiving Knowledge in Sacred Earth: Madrasa in the Marinid Chella” on Nov. 4 at 6pm in Hamilton 569.

Co-sponsored by the UNC Department of Art, the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, and the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies

 


Persian Lecture Series: Commentary on Gulshan-i Rāz with Professor Mohsen Kadviar

November 3, 2016 ” />

We invite you to join us for a five-part lecture series on Gulshan-i Rāz (“The rose garden of the secret”), featuring commentary by Professor Mohsen Kadviar. Please note that this event is in Persian and open to all who speak Persian or love Persian mystical literature. Gulshan-i rāz is the most eminent poetry work of a renowned 14th century Persian Sufi poet and gnostic, Mahmoūd Shabestarī, one of the most prominent scholars of the Islamic mysticism.  His poetry, very concisely, sheds light on a broad range of topics in Islamic mystical thought. This is the fourth session. Professor Mohsen Kadivar is an Iranian philosopher and research professor of Islamic Studies at Duke University. For more information, please contact Sam Aghamiri at sam.aghamiri@gmail.com.

Sponsors: The Iranian Circle of Culture and Wisdom, UNC Persian Studies, and the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations


The Way to the Spring: Life and Death in Palestine by Ben Ehrenreich

November 3, 2016 ” />

Award winning writer, Ben Ehrenreich, who has lived on and off in West Bank villages and towns since 2011, relates his experiences and reasons for writing this book of memoir, journalistic observations and interviews  with Palestinians and their everyday struggles under the Occupation. For more information, please contact Basel Quran at basel@live.unc.edu.

 

This event is sponsored by UNC-CH Students for Justice in Palestine.

 


From al Qaeda to the Islamic State: The Evolution of Violent Extremism in the Middle East, with Seth Cantey

November 3, 2016 ” />

Join the Duke Asian and Middle East Studies Center in welcoming Seth Cantey to discuss violent extremism in the Middle East. Seth Cantey is an Assistant Professor of Politics at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia, where he focuses on international security, American foreign policy, and Middle East Politics. The author, most recently, of The Middle East and South Asia, 2016-2017 (Rowman & Littlefield 2016), his current book project focuses on the role of strategy in negotiations between states and non-state actors. An avid traveler, he speaks Arabic, Portuguese, and Spanish.

 

Please contact Lauren Fraizer at lauren.fraizer@duke.edu for further information. This event is presented by the Duke Asian and Middle East Studies Center.


Reel Women Directors of the Middle East Film Festival: Mustang

November 3, 2016 ” />

The fifth and last film in the semester-long “Reel Women Directors of the Middle East Film Festival,” Mustang is a 2015 drama from Turkey. The film will be introduced by Professor Didem Havlioğlu (AMES) with a Q&A to follow. In a village in northern Turkey, Lale and her four sisters are walking home from school, playing innocently with some boys. The immorality of their play sets off a scandal that has unexpected consequences. The family home is progressively transformed into a prison; instruction in homemaking replaces school and marriages start being arranged. The five sisters who share a common passion for freedom, find ways of getting around the constraints imposed on them. Mustang has won numerous awards and was nominated for an Oscar for Best Foreign Film. In Turkish with English subtitles.

 

Sponsored by the Duke University Middle East Studies Center (DUMESC), Screen/Society, the Program in the Arts of the Moving Image (AMI), AMES Presents, and Duke University Libraries. For more information, contact mideast@duke.edu or click here.


Panel Discussion: Hashtag Journalism and Social Media Movements in Tunisia

November 3, 2016 ” />

Students, scholars, and community members who are interested in the Middle East, social movements, and journalism will want to engage in this panel discussion about how social media can be used as a watchdog on the government as well as for journalistic purposes. Also, this panel will address the trending topic of the interplay between media, social movements, and human rights, particularly in Tunisia. This lunchtime panel discussion will feature Amna Guellali, the Tunisian and Algerian Researcher for Human Rights Watch. Guellali is also the Media Fellow for the Fall 2016 Journalism and New Media Initiative of the Franklin Humanities Institute. Also on the panel from Duke University are Thomas DeGeorges and Alyssa Miller, with Robin Kirk as moderator. A light lunch will be served.

 

This event is sponsored as part of the Journalism and New Media Initiative of the Franklin Humanities Institute by Duke Public Affairs and Government Relations, Duke University Middle East Studies Center, and the Center for French and Francophone Studies. For more information, please email mideast@duke.edu or click here.


1001 Nights: Cultural Event

November 8, 2016 ” />

Location: Great Hall, UNC-CH Student Union

This event is FREE to attend!

Come explore the greater Middle East through performances, delicious food, calligraphy, and interactive cultural booths, brought to you by the Persian Cultural Society.

Hosting: Arab Student Organization, Iranian Student Organization of NC State, UNC Davis Library

Sponsored by UNC Persian Studies.


Panel Discussion: Service Learning and Local Refugee Populations

November 8, 2016 ” />

Three local practitioners will speak about service learning, volunteerism, and local refugee communities. The speakers are as follows:

Ryan Nilsen, Program Officer, Student Programs | Carolina Center for Public Service

Ellen Andrews, Director, Durham Immigration & Refugee Program | Church World Service

Kelly Owensby, Project Director, Transplanting Traditions Community Farm | Orange County Partnership for Young Children

This event will take place in the FedEx Global Education Center Room 3009.

Hosted by the Center for European Studies. This event has been produced with the assistance of the European Union. The contents of this event are the sole responsibility of The UNC Center for European Studies and can in no way be taken to reflect the views of the European Union. Co-Sponsors and/or additional support provided by The TransAtlantic Masters Program. For more information, please visit http://europe.unc.edu/event/panel-discussion-service-learning-and-local-refugee-populations-2/.


Film Screening: Battle of Algiers

November 9, 2016 ” />

Join Dr. Max Owre and his students on UNC’s campus for a special film screening of the Battle of Algiers the night before the event, “Politics and Violence in North Africa: Franco-Algerian Conflicts from Colonialism to the Arab Spring.”

If you haven’t seen the Battle of Algiers, the Criterion Collection describes it as “one of the most influential political films in history, The Battle of Algiers, by Gillo Pontecorvo, vividly re-creates a key year in the tumultuous Algerian struggle for independence from the occupying French in the 1950s. As violence escalates on both sides, children shoot soldiers at point-blank range, women plant bombs in cafés, and French soldiers resort to torture to break the will of the insurgents. Shot on the streets of Algiers in documentary style, the film is a case study in modern warfare, with its terrorist attacks and the brutal techniques used to combat them. Pontecorvo’s tour de force has astonishing relevance today.”

The screening will take place at 7:30pm at Dey 305 on UNC’s campus. For more information, please email human@unc.edu.


Annual Arabic Lecture | Dr. Rula Quawas

November 11, 2016 ” />

Please note that this event is for UNC students.

The Arabic program at UNC strongly encourages all students of Arabic to attend this semester’s Arabic lecture on Wednesday, Nov. 16 at 6 PM in the Nelson Mandela auditorium of the GEC. This year’s speaker will be Dr. Rula Quawas, a professor from the University of Jordan in Amman, and the topic of her lecture will be “مقاومة جديدة في الاردن؟” The lecture is appropriate for students from all levels, from first year and above. I hope to see most, if not all of you, at what promises to be an engaging and dynamic event. For more information, please contact Nadia Yaqub, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Asian Studies at yaqub@email.unc.edu.

 

 


Khalid Albaih and Culturunners, “A US Road Trip & Art and Social Media from the Middle East”

November 11, 2016 ” />

Join us for a presentation and conversation on the art and social media interventions of this great artist based in Qatar. Albaih will also share a new video produced for The Guardian, including recent RV adventures across the United Stated with the Culturunners.

Khalid Albaih is a Sudanese artist and political cartoonist born in Bucharest, Romania. He currently lives and works in Doha, Qatar, where he has been based since 1990. He publishes his cartoons on social media under “Khartoon!,” a word play on cartoon and Khartoum, the capital of Sudan. Albaih has published his cartoons widely in international publications including The Atlantic, PRI, and NPR, in addition to his published written social and  political commentary in publications such as The Guardian and Al Jazeera. His work has been exhibited in group exhibitions including “do it [in Arabic]” (Sharjah, 2016) and “RE:BELLION // RE:LIGION // RE:FORM – Artistic Action in Times of Crisis” (Zwickau, Germany, 2015) as well as solo exhibitions at Virgina Commonwealth University (Doha, Qatar, 2016), 1After360 Gallery (New Delhi, India, 2016), the Arab American National Museum (Dearborn, MI, 2015), McGill University Montreal, 2014), and Edge of Arabia (London, 2013). For more information, please click here.

For more information about the Culturunners, click here.

This event is organized by the FHI Social Practice Lab at Duke University and co-sponsored by the Duke Middle East Studies Center, the Keohane Collateral Fund & Duke Vice Provost for the Arts, and the DHRC@FHI.

Location: Smith Warehouse, Bay 4, Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall (Garage)


Urdu Majlis | Neelam Bashir

November 11, 2016 ” />

Urdu Majlis is the Triangle’s Urdu Literary Forum. This Urdu Majlis will concentrate on the life and works of Neelam Bashir, who will be our guest of honor. The meeting will also feature original poetry by participants. For more information, please contact Afroz Taj at taj@unc.edu.

This event is co-sponsored by the Carolina Asia Center and the South Asia Section of the UNC Dept. of Asian Studies.

WHERE: Room 1009, FedEx Global Education Center

7:00 Neelam Bashir

8:00 Original poetry etc. by participants

9:00 Refreshments

9:30 Building closes

Please arrive on time as a courtesy to others. Participants are invited to bring refreshments to share.

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Urdu Majlis is an intellectual endeavor with no political or religious affiliations.


Film Screening: The Garden of Eden

November 12, 2016 ” />

Please join us for a screening of the documentary The Garden of Eden (Ran Tal, 2013, Israel), with an introduction by Prof. Yaron Shemer, Asian Studies. This documentary tells the story of Gan HaShlosha, better known as the “Sakhne,” one of the largest, most famous and most visited parks in Israel. During the spring, summer, fall and winter seasons of one full year, the film documents the park’s transformation, and with a spectacular expression of cinematic beauty, it tells the stories of the people who visit the park and work therein. Director Ran Tal studies the innermost parts of Israeli society with humor, beauty, pain and compassion in the least expected location – a recreation park. For more information, please click here.

 

The film is part of the series “Art&Film: The Politics of Place,” co-sponsored by the Global Cinema Studies Program and the Ackland Art Museum.


UNC MSA Presents: Late Night with Hasan Minhaj

November 12, 2016 ” />

Get ready for a night full of laughs, because Daily Show correspondent Hasan Minhaj is coming to UNC! Hasan Minhaj is a comedian, actor, and writer in New York. He is a correspondent on the Emmy and Peabody award-winning program ‘The Daily Show with Trevor Noah’. His critically acclaimed one man show ‘Homecoming King’ played a sold out Off-Broadway run last winter, and is now touring nationally. A 2014 Just For Laughs ‘New Face’, he was selected by the Sundance Institute to develop his solo show and feature film at the prestigious New Frontier Storytelling Lab.

Tickets are $10 for students and $20 for general admission. You can purchase tickets at www.uncmsa.org. For more information, please contact outreach@uncmsa.org.

This event is sponsored by UNC Muslim Student Association.


“Not My Life” Film Screening & Panel Discussion

November 12, 2016 ” />

UNICEF at Carolina in conjunction with the UNC Geography Department will be showing a film screening of Not My LifeNot My Life is an independent documentary film that documents human trafficking in 13 countries across the globe as well as various forms of slavery, including involuntary servitude in US, military use of children in Uganda, and sex trafficking in Europe and Southeast Asia, among others. After the film screening, the public will have the opportunity to connect with survivors and advocates as they lead us through the many facets of human trafficking and modern slavery.

 

This event is sponsored by UNICEF and the UNC Geography Department. For more information, please contact Manuela Nivia at nivia@live.unc.edu.


Book Talk: Printing Arab Modernity (Leiden: Brill, 2016)

November 12, 2016 ” />

As part of the Jara’id workshop, Hala Auji will hold a talk on her book, Printing Arab Modernity. For more information, please visit the Jara’id 2.0 Website. Printing Arab Modernity  investigates and analyses the American Missionary Press in Beirut in the early 20th century. In doing so, she analyzes these publications as important visual and material objects that provide unique insights into an era of changing societal concerns and shifting intellectual attitudes of Syria’s Muslim and Christian populations.

 

This event is sponsored by the Duke University Library and the Duke Middle East Studies Center.


Human Rights and Counter Terrorism in Tunisia

November 12, 2016 ” />

Join Amna Guellali, a Tunisia and Algeria Researcher of the Middle East and North Africa Division at the Human Rights Watch, for a lecture titled “Human Rights and Counter-Terrorism in Tunisia.” In December 2010, Mohamed Bouazizi, a Tunisian street vendor, set himself on fire in protest, which served as a catalyst for the Tunisian Revolution and the broader Arab Spring. Nearly six years on and in an increasingly securitized environment, this event will focus on human rights and counter-terrorism and the example of Tunisia. Lunch will be provided. For more information, or to RSVP, please contact Ali Prince at ali.prince@law.duke.edu or visit here.

 

Co-sponsored by the International Human Rights Clinic, Center for International and Comparative Law, International Law Society, Human Rights Law Society, Center for French and Francophone Studies, Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute, and the Citizen Journalists in the Middle East and North Africa, in conjunction with the Franklin Humanities Institute and the Vice President for Public Affairs and Government Relations.


Carolina Seminar on Middle East Studies | Abdel-Baset Athamneh

November 15, 2016 ” />

The Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations invites our faculty and graduate students to attend a meeting of the Carolina Seminar on Middle East Studies, “Gender Differences in Unemployment and Poverty at Palestinian Refugee Camps in Jordan” with our visiting Carnegie Fellow, Abdel-Baset Athamneh, on Monday, December 5 from 12:00-2:00pm in the FedEx Global Education Center, room 3024. Lunch will be provided. Lunch will begin at 12pm, with the presentation beginning at 12:30.

Female refugees at Palestinian camps in Jordan have limited opportunities for education, training, and employment. This study, based on a survey of 674 families at the four refugee camps for Palestinians in Jordan, examines the difference between female-headed and male-headed households on a series of economic indicators, including unemployment and poverty rates.

Please RSVP
on this Doodle Poll by Thursday, December 1. We hope that you will be able to join us for this event. Please email Emma Harver at harver@email.unc.edu with questions or any dietary restrictions.

This event is part of the newly established Carolina Seminar on Middle East Studies, supported by the Carolina Seminars program, and replacing the long-running Carolina Seminar on Comparative Islamic Studies (2004-2014). Sponsored by the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations and the Carnegie Fellowships in Support of Arab Region Social Science.


Wednesdays at the Center: “The Koran in English: A Biography” with Bruce Lawrence

November 18, 2016 ” />

Bruce Lawrence is a Professor Emeritus of Duke University where he taught for four decades and was the inaugural director of the Duke University Islamic Studies Center. Lawrence holds a PhD in History of Religions from Yale University and has been awarded honorary ThDs from both Virginia Theological Seminary and Episcopal Divinity School. He is the author of numerous publications on religion and Islam, including Who Is Allah? (2015), The Qur’an: A Biography (2006), New Faiths, Old Fears (2002), and Sufi Martyrs of Love (2002).

This event is presented by the John Hope Franklin Center and the Duke University Middle East Studies Center. A light lunch will be served and parking is available in nearby parking decks. For more information, click here.


Abrahamic Table Panel Discussion: Thanksgiving

November 18, 2016 ” />

Three monotheistic faiths in the world (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) accept Abraham as the father of all nations. The Institute of Islamic and Turkish Studies brings community leaders and clergy from the three Abrahamic faiths to engage in a dialogue about the commonalities of and common issues concerning the Abrahamic communities over delicious food. Each speaker gives a brief interpretation on the given topic from their own background followed by a collective discussion over the topic. Although this event represents Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, all are welcome to the table. In this special gathering, distinguished speakers are Rabbi Daniel Greyber from Beth El Synagogue, Rev. Mandy Mizelle Norris from Pilgrim United Church of Christ, and Assistant Imam Fahrettin Merakli from IITS-NC. The theme will be creating a culture of thanksgiving.

 

Admission to the event is free. Please kindly RSVP by November 20th. For more information, please click. here.


UNC Arabic Calligraphy Competition

December 4, 2016 ” />

You are invited to attend the first Arabic calligraphy competition for UNC Arabic students this Thursday. The event will contain Debkah dance and Arab songs with some Arab homemade food and attendees will vote for the winners. Family, colleagues, and other students are welcome to attend. Materials and gifts for students are sponsored by Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East studies. The event is in New West #219 second floor and open to public. For more information, please contact Farida Badr at fbadr@email.unc.edu.

 

This event is sponsored by the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, UNC Department of Asian Studies, Arabic Club


Persian Lecture Series: Commentary on Gulshan-i Rāz with Professor Mohsen Kadviar

December 4, 2016 ” />

We invite you to join us for a five-part lecture series on Gulshan-i Rāz (“The rose garden of the secret”)featuring commentary by Professor Mohsen Kadviar. Please note that this event is in Persian and open to all who speak Persian or love Persian mystical literature. Gulshan-i rāz is the most  eminent poetry work of a renowned 14th century Persian Sufi poet and gnostic, Mahmoūd Shabestarī, one of the most prominent scholars of the Islamic mysticism.  His poetry, very concisely, sheds light on a broad range of topics in Islamic mystical thought. This is the fifth and final session. Professor Mohsen Kadivar is an Iranian philosopher and research professor of Islamic Studies at Duke University. For more information, please contact Sam Aghamiri at sam.aghamiri@gmail.com.

 

Sponsors: The Iranian Circle of Culture and Wisdom, UNC Persian Studies, and the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations


Feminism Here and Now Conference

December 4, 2016 ” />

As part of the Feminism Here and Now Conference, there will be two panels focusing on issues related to the Middle East:

 

Representation of Women’s Rights and Female Sexuality in Middle Eastern Literature

Friday, December 2 | 11:15 am – 12:45 pm

Graham Memorial Hall, room 038

 

Surviving Toxic Law: Negotiating Gender and Sexual Non-Conformity in Iran and Uganda

Friday, December 2 | 1:45 pm – 3:15 pm

Graham Memorial Hall, room 035

 

For more information and a list of sponsors, please click here.


Docunight Film Screening: Residents of One Way Street

December 4, 2016 ” />

Residents of One Way Street is a documentary about the lives and memories of six residents of one street in Tehran: The current ‘Si-ye Tir’ or the former ‘Qavam-o-Saltaneh’ Street, located in District 12 of Tehran. The street was originally named ‘Qavam-o-Saltaneh’ because the residence of Qavam os-Saltaneh, a prominent politician of the Qajar and Pahlavi eras, was located on it. After the Revolution in 1979, the street was re-named as Si-ye Tir (30th of Tir) to commemorate those who got martyred on that day in 1952 and who were killed during the time Qavam-o-Saltaneh was the Prime Minister. The street is one of the oldest in Tehran and in the past, people of different religions lived on it. Places of worship belonging to different religions and sects (Armenian Christians and other Christians, Jews, Muslims and Zoroastrians) can be found on this street. Now all that remains from the residents of the street are memories and photo albums. For more information, click here, or contact Ali Daraeepour at a.daraeepour@duke.edu.

This event is co-sponsored by the Graduate Student Association of Iranians at Duke University.


Persian Art Center in Carolina: Contemporary Iranian Poetry (Part 3)

December 5, 2016 ” />

***Due to inclement weather on Sunday, January 8th, this event has been postponed to Sunday, January 15th.

The Persian Art Center in Carolina program will begin with a social from 4-4:30pm, followed by a welcome and introduction by Amir Rezvani. The speaker for this event is Mr. Amin Azhdar. His presentation will be followed by discussion from 5:45-6:15pm. From 6:30-7:30, there will be live music and poetry readings from your favorite poets.

The Persian Poetry Group in Chapel Hill honors, respects and promotes freedom of speech and expression. For more information, please call 919-259-0959 or visit Kodoom.com.

Location:  400 Oak Tree Drive (The Club House) Chapel Hill, NC 27517


Dissident Subjects: A Conference in Honor of Professor miriam cooke

December 16, 2016 ” />

SAVE THE DATE!

Dissident Subjects: A Conference in Honor of Professor miriam cooke
April 6–8, 2017
Duke University

The Department of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies is honored to announce an international conference to honor Professor miriam cooke’s multifaceted career on the occasion of her retirement. Dr. cooke’s colleagues and friends will gather to address issues of relevance to miriam’s artistic and scholarly interests including the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Mediterranean cities, Islamic feminism, gender and conflict, and literature. Each of the conference panels will be arranged around one of these themes.

 

This event is sponsored by the Department of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, the Office of the Provost, the Office of the Deans, Franklin Humanities Institute Humanities Futures, Duke University Middle East Studies Center & the Duke Islamic Studies Center.

image020

SCHEDULE

 

 

Thursday, April 6 • John Hope Franklin Center Gallery  

4:30 pm – 6:00 pm • Reception for Creative Memory:
The Creative Memory of the Syrian Revolution

 

Friday, April 7 • Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room,
Rubenstein Library Room 153

 

9:00 am • Introductory Remarks by Hae-Young Kim (Duke), Erdağ Göknar (Duke)
& Bruce Lawrence (Emeritus, Duke) 

9:45 am • Panel  1:  Women Claim Islam, facilitated by Ellen McLarney (Duke)

Evelyne Accad (Lebanese American University) • Hina  Azam (UT-Austin)  • Judith Tucker (Georgetown) • Margot Badran (Wilson Center) • Banu Gökarıksel (UNC)  

 

11:45 am • Panel 2: Mediterranean  Passages, facilitated by Charles Wilkins (Wake Forest)

Susan  Slyomovics (UCLA) • Roberto  Dainotto (Duke) • Erdağ Göknar (Duke)   

 

2:30 pm • Afternoon Introductory Remarks by Charles Kurzman (UNC),
Shai Ginsburg (Duke) & Mbaye Lo (Duke)  

 

3:00 pm • Panel  3: Dissident Arts,  facilitated by Nancy Armstrong (Duke)

Muhsin al-Musawi (Columbia) • Fırat  Oruç (Georgetown-Qatar) • Farzaneh  Milani (UVA)
Negar Mottahedeh (Duke) • Ranjana Khanna (Duke)

 

Saturday, April 8  • John Hope Franklin Center Ahmadieh Family Conference Hall, Room 240

 

10:00 am • Panel  4: Palestine-Israel  

Eric Zakim (University of Maryland) • Nadia Yaqub (UNC) • Rebecca Stein (Duke)  

 

11:45 am • Lunchtime  Roundtable Discussion with Suad Joseph (UC Davis), Zeina Halabi (UNC), Carl Ernst (UNC), Leo Ching (Duke), Ellen McLarney (Duke) & Nancy Armstrong (Duke)

Download the Flyer


Urdu Majlis | Amjad Islam Amjad

December 16, 2016 ” />

Please join us Friday December 16, 2016 for the next monthly meeting of Urdu Majlis, the Triangle’s Urdu Literary Forum. This Urdu Majlis will concentrate on the life and works of Amjad Islam Amjad (b. 1944). The meeting will also feature original poetry by participants, followed by light refreshments. This event is free and open to the public. Urdu Majlis is an intellectual endeavor with no political or religious affiliations. For more information, please contact Professor Afroz Taj at taj@unc.edu.

This event is co-sponsored by the Carolina Asia Center and the South Asia Section of the UNC Department of Asian Studies.


Panel: Middle Eastern Women Writers and Their Impacts

December 16, 2016 ” />

Join us for a panel of two scholars on Middle Eastern women writers. The panelists will elaborate on the significance of women’s writing in contemporary Middle East and the challenges they have faced on their way.

Professor Nesreen Akhtarkhavari, Associate Professor and Director of Arabic Studies, DePaul University
Transcending Boundaries and Painting with Words: Jordanian Women Writers
Professor Akhtarkhavari will discuss Jordanian women writers and their contributions to the local and regional literary scene with a focus on the award-winning writer Samiha Kharis and her ability to breathe life into her work creating a range of Arab women protagonists, unrestrained and faithful to their social and cultural fabrics. Her work skillfully and artistically weaves the past with the present into a well-articulated and engaging narrative that transcends the boundaries of her local community, paint-ing with her words a panoramic view of women’s strengths, weaknesses, and dreams everywhere, speaking for Arab women as they see themselves, and not as men choose to depict them.

Professor Nasrin Rahimieh, Howard Baskerville Professor of Humanities and Comparative Literature, University of California, Irvine
A Bathroom of One’s Own: Iranian Women’s Contemporary Prose Writing
The flourishing of Iranian women’s writing in the wake of 1979 revolution has been much noted and celebrated. What is less scrutinized is whether this phenomenon is a reflection or byproduct of the revolution and what it might reveal about the conditions of women’s belonging to the national imaginary. Focusing on a selection of contemporary prose fiction penned by women, Professor Rahimieh will explore their representations of female subjectivity.

Panel Moderator: Professor Nadia Yaqub, Associate Professor and Chair of the
Department of Asian Studies, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

For information, please contact Dr. Claudia Yaghoobi, Roshan Assistant Professor of Persian Studies at Yaghoobi@email.unc.edu.

Sponsored by: UNC Persian Studies, Department of Asian Studies, Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, Institute for the Arts and Humanities, Center for Global Initiatives, and the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies.


Turkey Today Spring Lecture Series | Politics and Journalism in Turkey: Between the EU and Middle East with Cüneyt Özdemir

January 3, 2017 ” />

Join us for the first Turkey Today spring lecture with Mr. Cüneyt Özdemir! There will be a coffee hour starting at 4:30pm-5:20pm that students, faculty, staff and members of the general public are welcome to attend. A public lecture will follow 5:30pm-6:30pm.

Cüneyt Özdemir is a Turkish journalist who has worked extensively on politics in Turkey and globally since the 1990s. He is one of the founders of CNN Turk and the host of the daily evening news program 5N1K that has been running on CNN Turk over 18 years. He has interviewed many world leaders and famous figures and reported from war zones, sporting events, fashion weeks, and local and international hotspots. He wrote a daily column for Radikal, a major Turkish daily, between 2011 and 2014. He founded Dipnot TV production company in 2008, which produced many TV shows and documentaries and launched Turkey’s first digital magazine, Dipnot tablet in 2009. In addition, he has authored over 13 books about Turkish politics.

Özdemir will reflect on the recent political developments in Turkey and his own career trajectory as journalist. His analysis will include the 2016 coup attempt, the series of terrorist attacks by ISIL and the Kurdish guerrillas, and the tightening grip of the government on media and the public sphere. This discussion will evaluate Turkey’s shifting position in relation to the European Union and new ambitions for a leadership position in the Middle East.

This event is sponsored by the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, UNC Department of Geography, and the Center for European Studies.


Humanities Happy Hour: American Anxiety & Islamic Terrorism with Professor Charles Kurzman

January 4, 2017 ” />

Join Professor of Sociology, Charles Kurzman at Top of the Hill’s Back Bar from 6:00-7:00 p.m. on January 18 for Humanities Happy Hour. During this free casual event, Dr. Kurzman will discuss why American fears of Islamic terrorism are often exaggerated. Come raise a glass with one of Carolina’s finest faculty. Free snacks and a little bit of knowledge! For more information, visit http://humanities.unc.edu/event/humanities-happy-hour-american-anxiety-islamic-terrorism/.

Sponsored by the UNC Program in the Humanities.


Turkey Today Spring Lecture Series: “Feeling” the State: Alternative States and Territories of the Turkish-Muslim Diaspora in Germany with Devran Öcal

January 4, 2017 ” />

In their current research, graduate student Devran Koray Öcal and adviser, Dr. Banu Gökarıksel, examine how the Turkish Islamic Union of Religious Affairs impacts the construction of  a Sunni Muslim Turkish community, identity, and space in Germany. In conjunction with faculty advisor Dr. Gökarıksel, Devran received a faculty-graduate student joint research award from CES in 2016. Join us for a presentation on the research findings.

Devran Koray Öçal is a PhD student in the Department of Geography at UNC-CH. His research focuses on transnational Muslims and Turkey. Devran received his B.A. from Kocaeli University and M.A. from Istanbul Technical University.

This event is sponsored by the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations and the Center for European Studies.

Location: FedEx Global Education Center, room 3009


Lecture: A Cold War Crusader on an Ideological Battlefield: Andrew Eiva, the KGB, and the Soviet-Afghan War

January 6, 2017 ” />

An analysis of Andrew Eiva’s role as a Cold War crusader based on material he wrote as a lobbyist, Western media accounts, and clandestine reports about him from the files of the Lithuanian KGB reveals his behind-the-scenes significance as an ideologically-driven individual outside of the confines of government helping to shape US policy during the Soviet-Afghan War. The conflict in Afghanistan, the final proxy war of the Cold War, began with the Soviet invasion in December 1979 and lasted until their withdrawal in February 1989, pitting vague Western notions of “liberty” and “freedom” against an ardent Soviet belief in the liberating force of socialist “revolution.” As a lobbyist in the 1980s Andrew Eiva pursued strategies informed by his ideological assumptions to critique US bureaucracy and compel a stronger response to Soviet actions in Afghanistan, and he definitely had an impact. Soviet leaders were likewise driven by ideological imperatives, as Vojtech Mastny reminds us that the Soviet regime’s collapse “does not necessarily detract from the significance of its ideological underpinnings as long as it lasted.” Even in the 1980s Soviet leaders still clung to “ideological preconceptions” postulating “the ultimate victory of their system despite temporary setbacks.” I flesh out the ideological assumptions embedded in both Eiva’s portrayal of his own background, actions, and worldview and the KGB’s reports about him in order to reveal his role as a key figure and highlight the competing ideological frameworks of the Cold War superpowers. For more information, please visit here: http://cseees.unc.edu/event/cold-war-crusader-ideological-battlefield-andrew-eiva-kgb-soviet-afghan-war/.

Jeff Jones is Associate Professor in Russian/Soviet and world history at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. His book, Everyday Life and the ‘Reconstruction’ of Soviet Russia During and After the Great Patriotic War, 1943-1948, was published by Slavica Publishers in 2008. He is currently working on a book entitled Smoke, Mirrors, and Memories: Perspectives of the Soviet-Afghan War, 1979-2014.

The Carolina Seminar: Russia and Its Emipres, East and West is co-sponsored by the Carolina Seminar Program, the UNC Department of History, and the Duke Council for European Studies. Please note that the participants will give an overview of their projects, but will not read a formal paper. Instead, papers or book chapters will be posted here ahead of time for those who are interested in attending and participating in the discussion.

Location: 3009 FedEx Global Education Center


A Reading and Conversation with Habib Tengour

January 8, 2017 ” />

We invite you to join us for a reading and conversation with Algerian author and public intellectual Habib Tengour. Born in 1947 in Mostaganem, Eastern Algeria, and raised on the Arab and Berber voices of marketplace storytellers, Tengour has since lived most of his life between Algeria and Paris. Trained as an anthropologist and sociologist, he has taught at universities in both countries, while emerging over the years as one of the Maghreb’s most forceful and visionary contemporary Francophone voices. Author of poetry, fiction, nonfiction narratives and essays, his works include Le Vieux de la Montagne, (Sindbad, Paris, 1983), Gravité de l’ange (Éditions La Différence, Paris, 2004), and L’Arc et la cicatrice (Editions de la Différence, 2006).  He co-edited Poems for the Millennium, Vol. 4: the University of California Book of North African Literature, and his work has been translated.  This event is free and open to the public. For further information, contact Anna Levett at alevett@email.unc.edu.

 

Co-sponsors: UNC African Studies Center, Program in Creative Writing, UNC Department of Romance Studies, UNC Department of Asian Studies, Institute for the Arts and Humanities, Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, Duke Department of French and Francophone Studies, and the Duke Department of Asian and Middle East Studies.


Documenting the Middle East Film Festival: Censored Voices

January 8, 2017 ” />

The first film in the semester-long “Documenting the Middle East Film Festival,” Censored Voices is a 2015 documentary from Israel.  The film will be introduced by Professor Shai Ginsburg (AMES) with a Q&A to follow. In Hebrew and English with English subtitles. This film won Best Documentary at the Awards of the Israeli Film Academy in 2015.

On June 5, 1967, the armies of Egypt, Syria, and Jordan amass on Israel’s borders, threatening annihilation. Six days later, the war ends with Israel’s decisive victory – conquests of Gaza, Sinai, and the West Bank, tripling the tiny country’s size. Streets brim with joy, but behind the euphoria and a proud new national narrative of invincibility, are other voices. One week after the war, author Amos Oz audio-records intimate conversations with Israeli soldiers fresh from the battlefield. These provocative tapes, censored until now, are the core of a startling film about the tragic paradox of Zionism and the contradictions that arise when a people seeking freedom turn occupier, when David becomes Goliath. The soldiers’ harrowing confessions, combined with rare archival footage and evocative sound design, create a sense of stunning immediacy. We listen as these men, now almost 50 years older, hear the recordings for the first time, and the past erupts, presciently, into the present.

 

Sponsored by the Duke University Middle East Studies Center (DUMESC), Screen/Society, the Program in the Arts of the Moving Image (AMI), AMES Presents, and Duke University Libraries. For more information, contact mideast@duke.edu or click here.


Humanities Happy Hour: Protest Music with Professor Michael Figueroa

January 9, 2017 ” />

Join Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology, Michael Figueroa at Top of the Hill’s Back Bar from 6:00-7:00 p.m. on January 18 for Humanities Happy Hour. During this free casual event, Dr. Figueroa will discuss protest music, which we may be seeing more of during the next four years. Come raise a glass with one of Carolina’s finest faculty. Free snacks and a little bit of knowledge!

Michael A. Figueroa is an ethnomusicologist whose work resides at the intersection of music and political consciousness in Middle Eastern and African American contexts. His work argues a place for musical interpretation and performance in how people construct their notions of space, place, and society.

For more information, please visit http://humanities.unc.edu/event/humanities-happy-hour-protest-music/.


Egypt: Then & Now – A Dialogues Seminar

January 11, 2017 ” />

In collaboration with the African Studies Center and Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations

Archaeologist Jennifer Gates-Foster will discuss how life in Egypt changed during the era of Greek and Roman rule (4th century BC-7th century AD). She will discuss changes in the administration and organization of the country and its cities, including Alexandria, as well as the transformations that took in religious practices, domestic settings and burial customs. Next, author and Arabic scholar, Doria El-Kerdany, will speak about her hometowns of Cairo and Mansoura and offer insight into the daily lives of Egyptians today including issues of education, entertainment, politics and religion.  Our seminar will conclude with a panel discussion featuring both scholars fielding your questions on Egypt past, present, or future.

Topics and Speakers

Being Egyptian under Macedonian and Roman Rule
Jennifer Gates-Foster, Assistant Professor of Classical Archaeology

Egypt Today
Doria El-Kerdany, Lecturer in Arabic

Past, Present, or Future of Egypt
A panel discussion with our speakers

TIME & COST
9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, March 18, 2017. The tuition is $65 or register for all 4 Dialogue seminars for $200.00.  A meal will not be offered with this seminar.

For information about lodging click here.

Co-Sponsored by the General Alumni Association.

For information about GAA discounts and other scholarships available to Humanities Program participants, click here.

Register for this seminar.


International Coffee Hour

January 17, 2017 ” />

Join us for a social hour to bring together international UNC community members and students excited about global engagement. Chat about opportunities and challenges on campus. Meet staff from the hosting offices with great resources to share. This date is hosted by the Center for Global Initiatives and Study Abroad. For more information click here.

 

Sponsored by: Carolina Center for Global Initiatives, Study Abroad


Wednesdays at the Center: “Community and Student Filmmaking in Palestine” with Nadia Yaqub

January 17, 2017 ” />

Join us for a special screening of recent student and community-made films from the West Bank with a discussion led by Professor Nadia Yaqub, Associate Professor in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.  Films to be presented will be “The Living of the Pigeons,” (2015, 15 min.) by Baha Abu Shanab of the Dar al-Kalima University College of Arts & Culture: an observational film about day laborers going through a security checkpoint and “Reporter Suspended” (2015, 5 min.) directed by Sanabel Ibrahim and Renad Nasser of Al-Quds University. A kid’s view of media coverage in Palestine.

This event is presented by the John Hope Franklin Center and the Duke University Islamic Studies Center. A light lunch will be served and parking is available in nearby parking decks. For more information, click here.


Global Careers Workshop

January 17, 2017 ” />

Students- learn from both the employer’s perspective and from the applicant’s perspective, what should be included in your resume and cover letters, how to sell your international experience, and what it’s like to navigate the interview process. Dr. David Patton, Executive Vice President of the American Council for International Education, will lead the general session on the employer’s perspective. Breakout sessions according to world regions, led by UNC alumni, will follow. Coffee, pastries, and a pizza lunch will be provided. For more information, please click here.

This event is sponsored by: African Studies Center, Carolina Asia Center, Center for European Studies, Center for Slavic, Eurasian and East European Studies, Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, Institute for the Study of the Americas, Center for Global Initiatives, Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, UNC Global, College of Arts and Sciences, Curriculum in Global Studies, Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense, Department of Public Policy, Department of Asian Studies, Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literature, UNC Career Services, Department of African, African American and Diaspora Studies


Lecture: Reese Erlich: “A reporter’s perspective: Islamic State, Assad, Russia, and the failure of US policy”

January 18, 2017 ” />

Based on numerous reporting trips to the region, freelance foreign correspondent Reese Erlich discusses the growth of Syrian extremist rebel groups, the status of the Assad regime, foreign intervention and the failure of US policy. He provides up to date analysis and what the new US president will likely face after the November elections.

Erlich is a Peabody winning journalist and author of Inside Syria: The Backstory of Their Civil War and What the World Can Expect (Foreword by Noam Chomsky), just out in paperback. He has written a total of five books on US foreign policy. He reports for NPR, Foreign Policy, VICE News, and The Progressive, among others.

For more information, please see here.

The event is co-sponsored by the Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense, and the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations.


Urdu Majlis

January 20, 2017 ” />

Please join us Friday January 20, 2017 for the next monthly meeting of Urdu Majlis, the Triangle’s Urdu Literary Forum. This Urdu Majlis will concentrate on the life and works of Saghar Siddiqui. The event will also have original poetry by participants and refreshments.

This event is free and open to the public. This event is co-sponsored by the Carolina Asia Center and the South Asia Section of the UNC Dept. of Asian Studies. Urdu Majlis is an intellectual endeavor with no political or religious affiliations. For more information, please contact Afroz Taj at taj@unc.edu.


Rights! Camera! Action! presents A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness

January 20, 2017 ” />

In Pakistan, more than 1000 women perceived as having compromised the “honor” of their families are reported to be killed each year. Families are often pressured to forgive and absolve the aggressors, which allows them to return to the community. Told through the lens of a love story, this Oscar-nominated documentary examines the tensions between modernism and tradition in Pakistan. Directed by Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy (Oscar-winning Saving Face), the film follows Saba, a young Pakistani woman, who has survived her attempted honor killing by her own family.

 

This film screening is a part of the 2016-2017 Rights! Camera! Action! Film Series co-sponsored by the Duke Human Rights Center@FHI, Duke University Libraries, and the Program in the Arts of the Moving Image. For more information, please click here.


Muslim Diasporas Working Group Meeting

January 20, 2017 ” />

The next meeting of the Muslim Diasporas Working Group of Religions and Public Life at KIE will be on Friday, January 27 at 11:30AM, featuring a seminar by Adam Mestyan, Assistant Professor of History: “The Philanthropic Nation – Solidarity and The Middle Classes in the Late Ottoman Empire.” Adam Mestyan is an historian of the modern Middle East. His first monograph, Arab Patriotism – The Ideology and Culture of Power in Late Ottoman Egypt (Princeton University Press, 2017) presents a new story and theory about the birth of nationalism in Egypt and the Ottoman Empire. Previously, he taught at Oxford University and held fellowships at Harvard University and at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin. He was also elected in 2016 as a Freigeist Fellow by the Volkswagen Foundation for his new project “Modern Arab Kingship.” He also supervises a digital humanities project: Jara’id – A Chronology of Nineteenth-Century Periodicals in Arabic.

Contact David Steinbrenner for a copy of the paper and to RSVP for lunch or visit here for more details.


Counteracting Islamophobia: Rights, Policy, and Next Steps

January 20, 2017 ” />

All are welcome to join the Duke Muslim Law Students Association for a timely conversation about the civil rights, policies, and incident reporting efforts that protect American-Muslims. Panelists will discuss how both the legal community and the American-Muslim community can utilize these methods to safeguard the rights of Muslims in America. Co-sponsored by Baker Botts.

 

Panelists: Darrell Miller, Professor at Duke Law; Jillian Johnson, Durham City Council Member; Hamza Butler, Creator of ProjectMawla.comModerator: Jayne Huckerby, Clinical Professor at Duke Law. For more information, please visit here.


Cüneyt Özdemir Events at Duke

January 20, 2017 ” />

Cüneyt Özdemir is a Turkish broadcast journalist with 28 years of international journalism experience, the author of 13 research books, a television producer, and anchorman. Özdemir hosts Turkey’s leading local and foreign affairs program 5N1K.


“Journalism and Politics in Turkey” with Cüneyt Özdemir (CNN Türk)

Monday, January 30 | 6:00pm

Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room, Rubenstein Library Rm 153

Duke University

 

Describing his twenty-year experience as a journalist in Turkey, Özdemir will explain the many challenges of reporting objective news under an increasingly autocratic government intent on silencing political opposition. This event is sponsored as part of the Journalism and New Media Initiative of the Franklin Humanities Institute by Duke Public Affairs and Government Relations, the Duke University Middle East Studies Center, and the Center for French and Francophone Studies. For more information on this event, email mideast@duke.edu or click here.


“The Media under Turkey’s Justice & Development Party” with Cüneyt Özdemir (CNN Türk), Timur Kuran (Political Science, Duke) and Erdağ Göknar (DUMESC)

Wednesday, February 1 | 6:30pm

Nasher Auditorium — Nasher Museum of Art

Duke University

 

What is the relationship between media and ideology? How does political power distort the news, reducing it to a vehicle for maintaining power? What does the Turkish struggle between media freedom and political oppression reveal? As part of Duke’s Journalists of the MENA Region initiative, renowned Turkish journalist Özdemir explores these and other questions together DUMESC Director Erdağ Göknar and Professor of Economics and Political Science Timur Kuran. This event is sponsored as part of the Journalism and New Media Initiative of the Franklin Humanities Institute by Duke Public Affairs and Government Relations, the Duke University Middle East Studies Center, and the Center for French and Francophone Studies. For more information on this event, email mideast@duke.edu or click here.


Documenting the Middle East Film Festival: Defiance: The Night of the Failed Coup 

Thursday, February 2 | 7:00pm

Richard White Auditorium, East Campus

Duke University

 

The second film in the semester-long “Documenting the Middle East Film Festival,” Defiance: The Night of the Failed Coup is a 2016 documentary by Cüneyt Özdemir, who will introduce the film and participate in a question & answer session.

 

On July 15th 2016, Turkey faced a failed coup attempt. The secretive sect behind this coup attempt held army generals captive, attempted to arrest politicians and seize control of the Turkish democracy. They bombed the parliament, police stations and even military posts with warplanes, tanks, and helicopter. They opened fire on the unarmed civilians.  With a call to action from President Erdogan, Turkish civilians took to the streets against the coup, risking their lives to save their country. Hundreds of thousands of people with just flags in their hands stood up against coup soldiers holding weapons. Over 246 civilians lost their lives and 2185 were injured. This is the story a nation that rose to the challenge of protecting its democracy. It is about the longest night in Turkish history filled with the stories of people who lost their spouses, brothers and families. This film recounts only the facts, and yet the facts are strong enough to seize your heart and make you believe in the impossible. This is the story of ordinary people who brought about extraordinary outcomes.

 

Sponsored by the Duke University Middle East Studies Center (DUMESC), Screen/Society, the Program in the Arts of the Moving Image (AMI), AMES Presents, and Duke University Libraries. For more information, contact mideast@duke.edu or click here.


Schooling the Black Muslim Body: Knowledge, Transmission and Dhikr among the Mustafawiyya with Youssef Carter

January 20, 2017 ” />

Scholarly discourse on Islam in West Africa has focused on mobilities created through transnational Sufi networks, but only recently has attention turned toward the dissemination of religious knowledge and the rich legacies established from within West African intellectual traditions. Similarly, Muslims of African descent have, more often than not, been treated by diaspora scholars as impermeable communities with seemingly little interest in inter-diasporic exchanges that have taken place with regard to the configuration of identities, the transmission of religious knowledge, and the circulation of ideas throughout such networks. In other words, the historical analysis of African American Muslim communities, and ethnographic investigations of West African communities at home and abroad abound, yet they do not consider at length vital and growing (re)connections between the two. This lecture discusses the manner in which ideas circulate and identities form in a transregional spiritual network between Senegalese and African-American Muslims in the United States and in Senegal.

 

For more information, please contact Professor Ellen McLarney at Ellen ellenmc@duke.edu.

 


Max Amini Live in Raleigh

January 20, 2017 ” />

The Iranian Students Association at North Carolina State University proudly presents a live standup comedy show starring the one and only Max Amini for the first time in Raleigh. Please, Join us for a night full of fun and laughter. Max Amini, born in Tucson Arizona, from a Persian heritage was raised on the East Coast and graduated from UCLA’s school of Theater, Film and Television in 2004. As an actor, Max has over 50 film and television credits including NBC’s Heroes, regular appearances on Comedy Central’s Mind of Mencia, and a leading role in the upcoming feature film Beyond Paradise. While in college Max launched his stand up comedy career in 2002. He quickly built a reputation as one of the fastest growing comedians in the Los Angeles comedy circuit. Max is now headlining his own shows and has taken his tours internationally selling out around the world in Canada, UK, Australia, Germany, Dubai, Sweden, Kula Lumpur.

 

For more information and to purchase tickets, please click here.


North Carolina Interfaith Immigrant/Syrian Work Group

January 20, 2017 ” />

The North Carolina Interfaith Immigrant/Syrian Work Group, formed in 2016, seeks to raise awareness of the challenges faced by immigrants, especially those, such as Syrian refugees, who are fleeing violence and oppression. We seek to educate our communities and provide avenues for people to join us in advocacy and support to our brothers and sisters who are starting new lives in the USA.

This panel discussion will center on issues concerning refugees and immigrants in our region featuring:  Scott C. Phillips, North Carolina Field Office Director, US Committee for Refugees and Immigrants; Felix B. Ioyoko, Founder and President of Raleigh Immigrant Community; Dani Moore, Director, Immigrant and Refugee Rights Project for the NC Justice Center; and Moderated by: Dr. Angela Stuesse, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, UNC-Chapel Hill.

 

For more information, please email ncrefua@gmail.com.


Lecture | Russia and Turkey: Between Cooperation and Discord, Dimitar Bechev (CSEEES Fellow)

January 23, 2017 ” />

Drawing on his forthcoming book entitled Rival Power: Russia in Southeast Europe (Yale University Press), CSEEES Fellow Dimitar Bechev will explore the complex political, security, and economic ties between Russia and Turkey. Starting from the early 1990s, the two former imperial rivals have developed a pragmatic relationship based on growing levels of interdependence in the area of energy as well as on converging foreign policy preferences. They have sought to minimize conflicts and frictions in the Black Sea region, the Balkans, and wider Eurasia. Strongmen in power, Vladimir Putin and Tayyip Erdogan, have invested in bilateral relations and managed the diplomatic crisis triggered by Moscow’s military intervention in Syria and the subsequent downing of a Russian jet in November 2015. This presentation will examine the sources, dynamics, and limits of the Turkish-Russian rapprochement along with its implications for the U.S. and Europe. Please contact Adnan Džumhur dzumhur@email.unc.edu with questions.

Dimitar Bechev is Director of the European Policy Institute, a think-tank based in Sofia, Bulgaria. Previously, Dr. Bechev held research fellowships at Harvard University, University of Oxford, and the London School of Economics. He has written extensively on EU’s external relations, the politics and modern history of Turkey and the Balkans, and on Russia’s foreign policy. He is a regular contributor to Al Jazeera, the American Interest, Politico, Foreign Policy, and openDemocracy.

Cosponsored by CSEEES and the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations.


Lecture: Crisis in the Middle East: How Refugees and Families Cope and Look to the Future

January 24, 2017 ” />

Please join the Program in the Humanities and the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations for an evening with Bill Corcoran.

ANERA President Bill Corcoran discusses the challenges and needs of Syrian refugees and poor Palestinian families in Gaza. From lack of clean water to out-of-school youth, several issues afflict these communities and can continue to do so for generations to come. As an expert in refugee aid and development in the Middle East, Bill Corcoran will highlight the ways we can respond to ensure a safe, secure and dignified future.

Program Tuition: Register ahead of time and pay $18.00 per program or pay only $8 if you are a member of the UNC General Alumni Association (GAA). To check your membership status or to join the GAA, please visit alumni.unc.edu or call 800.962.0742. GAA membership is open to all UNC alumni and friends. Tuition is $20.00 for everyone paying at the door.

**Please note: This special event is not included as part of the Flyleaf Season Pass.** For more information, please contact Human@unc.edu.

Flyleaf Books: Location and Contact Info

752 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd (Historic Airport Rd)
Chapel Hill, NC 27514
Next to The Root Cellar (Formerly Foster’s Market)
Phone# 919-942-7373

Click here to register!

Photo Credit: John Stanmeyer via National Geographic.

Discussion with Joseph Smegel, “You Are Dead. You Are Here.”

January 25, 2017 ” />

Joseph Smegel will share a short talk on Wed. Jan. 25 at 3p.m. in 203 Bingham Hall on his project “You Are Dead. You Are Here.” The project looks at “Virtual Iraq”, a cognitive therapy used to treat PTSD in parallel with a story of a young Iraqi girl. This play will be fully produced at UNC, Sept. 2017.

A Seminar on the collaborative development of the multi-media play You Are Dead.  You Are Here., which will premiere at Swain Hall in Sept. 2017 (with a support grant from the National Endowment of the Arts.)  Developed by collaborators Joseph Megel (director/dramaturg), Christine Evans (playwright) and Jare Mezzocchi (media designer), You Are Dead. You Are Here. charts the entwined and spiraling lives of three people affected by war: Michael, a homeless African-American Iraq war veteran; Zaynab, an Iraqi teenage girl blogging from Fallujah; and Hanna, a white American therapist whose daughter seems to have vanished from a military base.

The seminar will look at how military technology is repurposed to tell complicated stories of war.  Inspired by the convergence of video-game style environments (BraveMind, Virtual Iraq) and military training and rehabilitation technology, the play connects the fault-lines of war trauma in three people’s disparate lives to an unexpected final reckoning.

You Are Dead. You Are Here. draws on collaboration with Dr. Albert (Skip) Rizzo, who created Virtual Iraq and helms its design team at the Institute for Creative Technologies (ICT) at the University of Southern California (USC). Grounded and You Are Dead. You Are Here. interrogate and complicate the “ First-person-shooter” point of view that drives both live-virtual military landscapes, and restore moral complexity and dimension to what Farocki terms “[w]ar (at a distance).”


Immigration Law and the New Administration

January 30, 2017 ” />

Carolina Student Legal Services, Inc., Justice Initiatives, Inc., and the Town of Chapel Hill will co-sponsor an Open Forum for the University and the surrounding Community entitled: Immigration Law and the New Administration 

Wednesday, February 1, 2017
6:00 to 8:00 pm
Carolina Union Auditorium on the Campus of UNC Chapel Hill

Speakers Include the Following:
• Professor Lynn Calder, Immigration Attorney and Supervisor, UNC School of Law Immigration Clinic
• Richard Sin, Immigration Attorney, Law Office of Matthew Suczynski, Chapel Hill, NC
• Jim Woodall, District Attorney for Orange and Chatham Counties
• Jeff McCracken, Chief of Police for UNC Public Safety
• Chris Blue, Chief of Police for Town of Chapel Hill
• Walter Horton, Chief of Police for Town of Carrboro
• Charles Blackwood, Orange County Sheriff
• Jonathan Sauls, Dean of Students for UNC-Chapel Hill
• Jim Huegerich, Town of Chapel Hill Ombuds Office

Topics of Discussion Include:
• Anticipated Changes in Immigration Policy and Laws Under the New Administration
• What to Expect with Deferred Action for Child Arrivals (DACA)
• What to Expect with the Refugee Policy
• Immigration Consequences of Criminal Offenses
• Local Law Enforcement Policies and Procedures with Non-U.S. Citizens
• Local Law Enforcement Relationships with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)
• Know Your Rights if Contacted by ICE
• UNC Resources and Support for UNC Students
• Town of Chapel Hill Resources and Support for Local Residents

Parking is available at Cobb Deck, Stadium Drive and Rams Head Deck after 5:00 pm.
There are also metered spaces available on South Road.


Study Abroad 101 Info Session: Africa and the Middle East

January 30, 2017 ” />

Thinking about studying abroad? Interested in Africa or the Middle East? Come to this general information session to learn more about study abroad opportunities with a focus on programs in Africa and the Middle East. For more information, please contact abroad@unc.edu.


Film Screening: Unveiled: The Kohistan Video Scandal

January 30, 2017 ” />

As part of the annual NC International South Asian Film Festival, there will be a film screening of Unveiled: The Kohistan Video Scandal. When a video of girls singing and clapping goes viral in a remote village in Northern Pakistan, the local tribal Jirga is accused of ordering their brutal murder. As the story goes from headlines to court rooms, it becomes clear that in a land of ancient traditions, the line between public and private can become fatally blurred when digital media enters the room. The Kohistan Video Scandal is a kind of digital trial, bringing together evidence for a case which unveils a deepening conflict between constitutional and tribal justice in Pakistan.

 

This festival is sponsored by Geet Bazaar Radio Station, Naresh Giri, Triangle Events, Afroz Taj and John Caldwell. For more information, please click here.


Film Screening: Hello My Friend

January 30, 2017 ” />

Please join the Afghan Sister School Partnership at the premiere of Hello My Friend, a short film chronicling two schools, a world apart, committed to building bridges of peace and friendship through the shared belief that peace and education are the rights of children everywhere. Special guest speaker, Noorin Nazari, will lead a discussion surrounding the film. Nazari is a longtime friend of the ASSP and has over 10 years of experience in the education sector in South Asia, including Afghanistan. Ms. Nazari will draw on her experiences with Topchi students in Afghanistan, share insights from her most recent visit to Afghanistan, and talk about the opportunities and challenges facing the education sector there. She will also discuss her current research interests with regard to religious radicalization in the educational systems of Islamic countries.

 

All are welcome, and childcare is provided. For more information, please call 919.383.6602.


Hima: Protecting the Environment in the Middle East

January 30, 2017 ” />

Dr. Gary Nabhan will give a talk about his work on protecting the environment in the Middle East. Dr. Gary Paul Nabhan is an award-winning natural history writer, poet and journalist of Lebanese-American descent. In addition to his 28 books, his writing has appeared in the New York Times, LA Times, World Monitor, Aramco World, Nature, Audubon, Orion, Mizna, Georgia Review, Gastronomica, Best Food Writing and Best Science/Nature Writing. As an agroecologist and desert plant explorer, he has done field work in Lebanon, Oman, Egypt, Mexico and Central Asia. He lives on a small farm in Patagonia Arizona, where he grows 150 varieties of desert fruit trees, processing the fruit into the ancient “sharab” or shrub syrup beverages of Arab origin.

 

This event is hosted by the Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies. For more information, please click here.


Lecture: Mohammed Abubakr, Sudanese Civil and Human Rights Activist

February 4, 2017 ” />

Mohamed is a civil and human rights activist from Sudan with over 10 years of experience in the nonprofit sector. Mohamed will come to Chapel Hill to share his personal story and to speak about the war in Darfur, the asylum seekers and refugees challenges across Africa, the Middle East and Europe in the current world climate.

At the age of 14, he co-founded the SudanAid association, reaching over  1,500 children and other vulnerable groups. In 2012, Mohamed co-founded the Of Noor Foundation – a multidisciplinary non-profit organization dedicated to education, empowerment of youth and women, assisting victims of persecution and humanitarian assistance. Mohamed has been a member of the YaLa Young Leaders Middle East peace movement, actively engaging in dialogue and cooperation across the Middle East.

 

This event is sponsored by UNC Hillel.


Process Series Performance: Shattered Glass by Mohammad Moussa

February 4, 2017 ” />

On February 10th, 2015, Deah Barakat, his wife Yusor Abu-Salha, and her sister Razan Abu-Salha were murdered in their home. In the aftermath people around the world are left with many questions. Who were Deah, Yusor, and Razan? What does it mean to lose your child, your sibling, or your friend? What do we do in the wake of disaster? And after our nightmares come alive, how do we remember how to dream? In this piece, the audience goes through a journey of loss, emptiness, comfort, and growth as they try to find some answers. The first performance is on the anniversary of this tragedy.

 

Sponsored by the Process Series. Admission is free with a suggested five-dollar donation. Seats can be reserved on the Process Series website. http://processseries.unc.edu.  All performances are at Swain Hall Studio Six Theatre. For more information feel free to call the Process Series office at (919) 843-5666.


Workshop: Immigration and Refugee Policy in Crisis: Reflections for a New President

February 4, 2017 ” />

Immigration and refugee policy has reached a global crisis. More people are compelled to cross borders than ever in our planet’s history. Meanwhile, the role of nations in providing for economic and political refugees is increasingly uncertain. Join us for a day of roundtable dialogue with researchers, community practitioners, and policymakers working on key topics of immigration policy reform and refugee resettlement and services. With opportunities for discussion among leading experts, the event will explore what’s at stake in this time of transition, charting policymaking and research agendas.

Lunch will be provided for registered participants. Please register by February 11, 2017: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/9LKBJYH. Free parking will be in available in the underground garage below the FedEx Global Education Center.

This event is organized by the UNC Curriculum in Global Studies. Co-sponsors: The College of Arts and Sciences, The Latino Migration Project, The Institute for the Study of the Americas, The Center for Global Initiatives, The Migration Studies Group, The Department of Sociology, The Department of Anthropology, The UNC Latino/a Studies Program, The Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, The UNC School of Law.


2nd Annual African Film Festival: ‘The Rooftops’ / ‘Es-Stouh’ (Algeria, 2015)

February 4, 2017 ” />

Celebrate African cinema during the 2nd Annual African Film Festival! This first film focuses on Algeria. Light refreshments will be served before each screening. Free and open to the public.

“The Rooftops” / “Es-Stouh” (Merzak Allouache, 2015, 92 min, France/Algeria, in Arabic w/ English subtitles):  An overcrowded city, with its endless traffic jams, its chaotic crowd, its rundown buildings, its old apartments piled up with families trying to survive… In this suffocating city, the terraces, progressively transformed into living spaces, they too, over time, become effervescent spaces where smiles cross the hurt, life and death. The Casbah, Bab el Oued, Belcourt, Notre-Dame d’Afrique, Telemly. Five historic neighborhoods of the Algerian capital. Five rooftops beautifully open to the city, the bay, the sea, and the horizon far away. Five stories independent of each other, that mingle and clash in the span of one day. From dawn till night, paced by the five calls to prayer coming from the numerous mosques of the city.

Sponsored by the Duke University Africa Initiative, African & African American Studies at Duke University, Program in the Arts of the Moving Image and Screen/Society.  For more information, click here or contact Deirdre White at deirdre.white@duke.edu.


Preserving Culture at the Fringes in Authoritarian States

February 4, 2017 ” />

Panel 1: Historical Perspectives 2:00-3:15 pm

Michael Newcity, Duke University: “Minority Language Rights in the Former Soviet Union”

Mustafa Tuna, Duke University: “How Religion Survives: Transmission of Islamic Knowledge in Early Republican Turkey”

Discussant: Eren Taşar, UNC-Chapel Hill

 

Panel 2: Contemporary Perspectives 3:30-4:45 pm

Bill Bowring, University of London: “The Kremlin’s Project of Creating a ‘Rossiiskii Narod’: What Does This Mean for the Tatars”

Sophie Roche, University of Heidelberg: “Muslim and Migrant in Moscow: Bazaar Workers from Tajikistan”

Discussant: Shai Ginsburg, Duke University

 

Joint Discussion 4:45-5:15 pm 

 

Sponsored by the Franklin Humanities Institute Humanities Futures, the Slavic and Eurasian Studies Department and the Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies.  For more information please contact David Baxter – david.baxter@duke.edu.


Panel Discussion: Challenging Anti-Muslim Sentiments

February 5, 2017 ” />

The Leaders for Change program presents a panel discussion about the history and current religious climate of Islam. Panelists will provide an overview of the religion, discuss challenges that have arisen, and provide impactful solutions for change. The panelists presenting include: Fonda Muhammad, educator with over 20 years of experience; Shadi Sadi, activist and community outreach coordinator in the Triangle Area; Imam Abdullah Antepli, Islamic leader, Head of Muslim Affairs at Duke Divinity School; and Dr. Anne Bigelow, Associate Professor of Religious Studies, NCSU.

This event is sponsored by the Center for Student Leadership, Ethics and Public Service. Please contact Doha Hindi here for more information.


The Persian Art Center in Carolina Presents: A Talk on Poetry and Literature

February 5, 2017 ” />

Please join the Persian Art Center in Carolina for a night of poetry and literature. The program will begin with a social from 4-4:30pm, followed by a welcome and introduction by Amir Rezvani. Audience participation and an open forum will follow from 4:45-6:30. Starting at 6:45, there will be live Persian music and poetry reading from your favorite poets.

 

The Persian Poetry Group in Chapel Hill honors, respects and promotes freedom of speech and expression. For more information, please call 919-259-0959 or visit Kodoom.com.


The Parents Circle: Bereavement and Reconciliation in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

February 6, 2017 ” />

The Parents Circle-Families Forum (PCFF) is a joint Palestinian and Israeli organization of over 600 families, all of whom have lost a close family member as a result of the prolonged conflict. The Parents Circle believes that we can only achieve peace by sharing our personal experiences. The event will bear witness to the personal pain of the conflict from an Israeli and a Palestinian member of the Parents Circle.

Location: Westbrook 0012, Divinity School, Duke University

Sponsored by J Street U Duke, the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, the Center for Jewish Studies, Jewish Life at Duke, and the Duke University Middle Eastern Studies Center.

For more information, email mideast@duke.edu.


Public Lecture: “Adventures in Field-Building: On the History of Area Studies and Middle East Studies in the United States” by Dr. Zachary Lockman (NYU)

February 6, 2017 ” />

Area studies is often simplistically depicted as little more than a Cold War form of knowledge, but its emergence as a component of the postwar American academic scene was in fact propelled and shaped by visions, exigencies and contingencies that were not initially or exclusively about the needs of the national security state. Zachary Lockman’s 2016 book Field Notes: The Making of Middle East Studies in the United States draws on extensive archival research to offer a different perspective on the origins and trajectory of area studies in the United States and to explore how the field of Middle East studies in the United States was actually built. The book’s focus is not on intellectual paradigms or scholarly output but rather on funding decisions and their  rationales, efforts to elaborate a distinctive theory and method for area studies, the anxieties these efforts generated for Middle East studies, and the unanticipated consequences of building these new academic fields.

Zachary Lockman has taught modern Middle Eastern history at New York University since 1995. His most recent book is Field Notes: The Making of Middle East Studies in the United States (2016). He is also the author of Contending Visions of the Middle East: The History and Politics of Orientalism (2004); Comrades and Enemies: Arab and Jewish Workers in Palestine, 1906–1948 (1996); and (with Joel Beinin) Workers on the Nile: Nationalism, Communism, Islam, and the Egyptian Working Class, 1882–1954 (1987). He is a former president of the Middle East Studies Association, chairs the wing of MESA’s Committee on Academic Freedom that deals with North America, and is a contributing editor of Middle East Report.

This event is sponsored by Duke University Middle East Studies Center, the Duke University Center for International and Global Studies, Jewish Studies, the Department of History, and Cultural Anthropology.

For more information, email mideast@duke.edu or click here.

Location: Thomas Room, Lilly Library, East Campus


Film Screening: On the Bride’s Side with Q&A

February 6, 2017 ” />

The third film in the semester-long “Documenting the Middle East Film Festival,” On the Bride’s Side is a 2015 documentary from Israel. The film will be introduced by Anna Kipervaser with a Q&A to follow.

A Palestinian poet and an Italian journalist meet five Palestinians and Syrians in Milan who entered Europe via the Italian island of Lampedusa after fleeing the war in Syria. They decide to help them complete their journey to Sweden – and hopefully avoid getting themselves arrested as traffickers – by faking a wedding. With a Palestinian friend dressed up as the bride and a dozen or so Italian and Syrian friends as wedding guests, they cross halfway over Europe on a four-day journey of three thousand kilometres. This emotionally charged journey not only brings out the stories and hopes and dreams of the five Palestinians and Syrians and their rather special traffickers, but also reveals an unknown side of Europe – a transnational, supportive, and irreverent Europe that ridicules the laws and restrictions of the Fortress in a kind of masquerade which is no other than the direct filming of something that really took place on the road from Milan to Stockholm from the 14th to the 18th of November 2013.

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJ1Y43cIM60

“On the Bride’s Side” (Antonio Augugliaro, Gabriele del Grande, Khaled Soliman al Nassiry, 2014, 89 min, Italy, in Arabic and Italian w/ English Subtitles, Color, DVD)

Sponsored by the Duke University Middle East Studies Center (DUMESC), Screen/Society, the Program in the Arts of the Moving Image (AMI), AMES Presents, and Duke University Libraries. For more information, contact mideast@duke.edu.

For more information, email mideast@duke.edu or click here.

Location: White Lecture Hall, Duke East Campus


Panel Discussion: Contending Visions of the Middle East

February 6, 2017 ” />

This panel will use Zachary Lockman’s influential book, Contending Visions of the Middle East: The History and Politics of Orientalism (Cambridge, 2004), as a jumping off point to discuss the ways in which Westerners have examined and depicted Islam and the Middle East. The discussion will also address Lockman’s recent publication Field Notes: The Making of Middle East Studies in the US (Stanford, 2016), including the politics, controversies, and critical issues relating to the US and the Middle East. Participants include Lockman (History, NYU), Charles Kurzman (Sociology, UNC), and Adam Mestyan (History, Duke).

This event is sponsored by the Duke University Center for International and Global Studies, Jewish Studies, Cultural Anthropology, the Department of History, and the Duke University Middle East Studies Center.

For more information, email mideast@duke.edu or click here.

Location: Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room, Rubenstein Library Rm 153


Public Lecture: “International Law for the Weak State: The Ottoman Empire”

February 6, 2017 ” />

Mostafa Minawi (Cornell University) introduces his book “The Ottoman Scramble for Africa” (Stanford UP, 2016).

Professor Minawi will explore the role that the philosophy behind 19th-century notions of international law played in maintaining and expanding an exclusively European colonial possession in Africa and Asia. Using the Ottoman Empire’s part  icipation in the Conference in Berlin (1884-85) as a case study, he will argue that Istanbul understood how positivist international law gave the upper hand to the Great Powers, but continued to be deeply invested in the maintaining its place at the table of negotiations with other imperial powers, not just to claim the “right” to new territories in central Africa, but also in order to maintain a legal right to sovereignty within the borders of the Ottoman Empire.

Sponsored by Duke University Middle East Studies Center, Duke University Africa Initiative and Duke History Department.

For more information, email mideast@duke.edu or click here.

Location: Boyd Seminar Room 229, Carr Building, Duke University


Wednesdays at the Center: “The War Against Rape as a Weapon of War” with miriam cooke

February 6, 2017 ” />

Rape has always been part of war, but in the 20th century as military technology increased the scale of warfare so did the rate of rape. During the 1990s, the Serb rape camps holding Bosnian Muslim women in sexual bondage and then the rape camps of the Rwandan Genocide galvanized international action. The ICC trials led to the declaration that rape in war constitutes a crime against humanity. Activists were elated, yet rape remains an authorized weapon of war. This talk will focus on the most alarming case of the 21st century: Islamic State and Fatwa 64, known as the Rape Handbook.

miriam cooke is Braxton Craven Professor of Arab Cultures at Duke University. She has taught Arabic language and a wide variety of courses on Arabic literature, war and gender, the Palestine-Israel conflict, post-colonial theory. Her writings have focused on the intersection of gender and war in modern Arabic literature and on Arab women writers’ constructions of Islamic feminism.

For more information, email mideast@duke.edu or click here.

Location: Ahmadieh Family Conference Hall, Room 240, John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University


Duke-UNC Islamic & Middle East Studies Graduate Student Conference: “Affect in Dissent: Past and Present”

February 6, 2017 ” />

Muslims across the globe – from the Middle East, North America, South Asia, and beyond – have been in constant engagement with the changing material and social conditions of human experience. The conference will explore the multiple ways that Muslims in various places have confronted and objected to these conditions historically and in the present. These changing conditions have been evaluated from a variety of vantage points, whether through sociological, theological, economic, historical, or artistic means. Studies of affect, comportment, bodily habit, and discipline could provide an alternative critical lens through which to interrogate the dynamics and practices of power within, between, and against Muslim collectives throughout the world. This year’s workshop asks how affect is intimately connected with historical and contemporary practices of dissent among Muslims. Furthermore, we are interested in challenging disciplinary boundaries, while also contributing to the burgeoning body of scholarship on affect and religion in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies, broadly defined.

Please register here for the workshop. Please email Samah Choudhury, samah@unc.edu, for more information.

Sponsored By: Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, UNC Department of Religious Studies, UNC Asia Center, Duke Department of Religious Studies, Duke Department of Cultural Anthropology, Duke Department of Political Science, Duke Islamic Studies Center, Duke Middle Eastern Studies Center.

Location: Campus Y Reading Room, UNC Chapel Hill


CANCELLED: Panel Discussion: “Palestine and US Relations” with Palestinian Ambassador Maen Rashid Areikat and Duke Professors David Schanzer and miriam cooke

February 6, 2017 ” />

Please note that this event has been cancelled, and is no longer occurring.

The US-Palestinian relationship has shaped much of Middle East politics for decades. Despite a close working relationship with Israel, the United States has often tried to serve the role of the ‘honest broker’ in handling the Israel-Palestine conflict, which has, in turn, necessitated an effective working relationship with Palestine. The relative strain on, or warmth of, this relationship has always been in flux and responsive to current event, but a new American foreign policy under President Trump will naturally challenge the status quo, perhaps more drastically than at any point in the past. Palestinian-US dialogue will remain of critical importance over the course of the next few years.

Ambassador Areikat currently serves as Chief Representative of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) to the United States since May 2009. Previously, Ambassador Areikat served 11 years at the Negotiations Affairs Department (NAD) of the PLO in Ramallah, most recently as its Deputy Head and Coordinator-General (2008-2009). The panel will include him, as well as Duke professors David Schanzer and miriam cooke.

This event is co-sponsored by the Duke Political Science Department, The Sanford School for Public Policy, and the Duke University Middle East Studies Center.

For more information, email mideast@duke.edu.

Location: Forum for Scholars and Publics, West Campus, Duke University


Public Lecture: “Hebrew, Arabic, and Death: Palestine-Israel and the Global Novel” with Anna Bernard (Kings College London)

February 6, 2017 ” />

Anna Bernard (Kings College London) introduces her book Rhetorics of Belonging: Nation, Narration, and Israel/Palestine (Oxford University Press, 2013).

The crisis in Israel/Palestine has long been the world’s most visible military conflict. Yet the region’s cultural and intellectual life remains all but unknown to most foreign observers, which means that literary texts that make it into circulation abroad tend to be received as historical documents rather than aesthetic artefacts. Rhetorics of Belonging examines the diverse ways in which Palestinian and Israeli world writers have responded to the expectation that they will ‘narrate’ the nation, invigorating critical debates about the political and artistic value of national narration as a reading and writing practice. In her lecture, Bernard will discuss in particular the point about novels’ entailments to the nation in a global context of circulation and reception.

For more information, email mideast@duke.edu.

Location: FHI Garage, Smith Warehouse, Bay 4, Duke University

image016


Film Screening: “Remake, Remix, Rip-Off” with Q&A

February 6, 2017 ” />

The fourth film in the semester-long Documenting the Middle East Film Festival. “Remake, Remix, Rip-Off” is a documentary from Turkey. A Q&A with Didem Havlioğlu will follow the screening.

The Turkish film industry “Yeşilçam” was both financially and structurally weak. But with the help of basically non-existing copyright law, Yeşilçam filmmakers started producing remakes of European, American, and Indian movies. But they did not simply remake the movies scene by scene, they were using the movies’ soundtracks or even special effect scenes. In its 100 years of existence Turkish cinema produced more than 7000 movies. With the arrival of television in the mid 70s and the strict neoliberal direction Turkish politics took up after the military coup in 1980, Yeşilçam’s demise began.

Cem Kaya grew up with Yeşilçam movies from Turkish video stores in Germany. His documentary illustrates the origin of copy culture of Turkish filmmakers, starting with Yeşilçam and leading into today’s television series. In Istanbul, he met with directing legends, producers, actors, and film scientists to capture a glace of the country’s tumultuous history of movie making. Remake, Remix, Rip-Off took 7 years in the making, during which Kaya watched thousands of movies and conducted about a hundred interviews.

Sponsored by the Duke University Middle East Studies Center (DUMESC), Screen/Society, the Program in the Arts of the Moving Image (AMI), AMES Presents, and Duke University Libraries. For more information, contact mideast@duke.edu.

Location: Richard White Auditorium, Duke East Campus


Public Lecture: “Muslim Women in the Balkans between Nationalism and Transnationalism” with Ina Merdjanova (Trinity College, Dublin)

February 6, 2017 ” />

Ina Merdjanova (Trinity College, Dublin) introduces her book Muslims in the Balkans Between Nationalism and Transnationalism (OUP USA, 2013).

With the newly-gained religious freedom, and in the context of multiple structural and cultural transitions, Muslim communities underwent remarkable transformations. They sought to renegotiate their place in formally secular legal and normative environments, mostly as minorities in majority-Christian societies. They reclaimed their Islamic faith, practices, and identities in a complex geopolitical situation dominated (particularly after 9/11) by anti-Muslim sentiments. The rising political and cultural self-awareness of Muslims in Southeast Europe was frequently expressed by recourse to two frames of reference: the national and the transnational. Despite a certain level of tension between those two perspectives, they were closely intertwined. Transnational Islamic influences often reinforced Muslim ethnonational identities rather than prompting a radical redefinition of religious allegiances in the key of a “universalist” Islam. Merdjanova explores the transformations of Muslim identities in the region under the influence of various national and transnational, domestic and global factors, while also looking at the historical legacies that inform present complexities.

For more information, email mideast@duke.edu.


Wars and Veterans: A Panel Discussion

February 6, 2017 ” />

Please join UNC Persian Studies for panel on the variety of lived experiences and literary expressions of the Iran-Iraq War.

The Evil Benevolence of War in Iranian Sacred Defense Literature
Amir Khadem
, PhD candidate in Comparative Literature at University of Alberta

Using examples from the pro-state Iranian literature during and after the 1980-88 war against Iraq, this talk will offer an analysis of the narrative schemes and thematic patterns of the genre called Sacred Defense Literature. While the agenda of this genre is generally propagandist, its narrative nuances are not reducible to a simple ideological framework of hard-liner fundamentalism. For example, this literary genre has to find an answer to the question of how a war between two predominantly Muslim nations can be narrated as a resistance of modern Islam against late Western imperialism. The literature of Sacred Defense makes the case for both pacifism and chauvinism, as this talk will demonstrate via a set of textual examples.

Iranian Women, Social Class, and Patriotism in the Iran Iraq War
Mateo Farzaneh, Associate Professor of History at Northeastern University

Hundreds of thousands of Iranian women participated in a war that Saddam Hussein suddenly launched against Iran in 1980. Directly and forcefully these women contributed in the eight-year conflict and in this talk Farzaneh will discuss some of the unidentified factors behind their contribution.

Panel Moderator: Brian Gibbs, Assistant Professor of Education at UNC- Chapel Hill

For more information, please contact Dr. Claudia Yaghoobi, Yaghoobi@email.unc.edu.

Sponsors: UNC Persian Studies, Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, Department of Peace, War, and Defense, and the First Year Seminar Enhancement Fund.

Location: FedEx Global Education Center room 1005


Conference: GO! Global Orientation on Culture + Ethics

February 14, 2017 ” />

Do you have plans to go abroad? Are you considering having a global opportunity? You should attend GO! Global Orientation on Culture + Ethics. The free conference helps students evaluate expectations, anticipate potential cultural and ethical challenges, prepare for community engagement, and develop intercultural competencies. The conference covers interdisciplinary topics for undergraduate and graduate students. Whether you have been abroad 100 times or this is your first time considering a global opportunity, come join us for a day full of information, networking with students and campus resources, and free food!

Registration for GO! Global Orientation on Culture + Ethics is now open. Explore the twelve sessions and Global Connections lunch options that can help students evaluate expectations, anticipate potential cultural and ethical challenges, prepare for international community engagement, and develop intercultural competencies. The conference is open and free for anyone interested in attending, but register now to secure your spot because there is only room for 250 participants. Find updated information on our website or follow our (new) Facebook Event. We hope to see you there and embark with you on the many global opportunities ahead!

 


Concert: The Nile Project

February 15, 2017 ” />

Join NC State University for the Nile Project Concert | Wednesday, March 15, 2017 at 7:30pm, Stewart Theatre, Talley Student Union

The first Nile Project U.S. tour in 2015 earned raves from coast to coast. The New York Times called them “a committed, euphoric international coalition,” and Afropop Worldwide said the Nile Project was “nothing short of revolutionary.” In 2017, the Nile Project launched their second U.S. tour with an extended residency at NC State from March 15 to 21.

Founded in 2011 by Egyptian ethnomusicologist Mina Girgis and Ethiopian-American singer Meklit Hadero, the Nile Project is one of the tightest cross-cultural musical collaborations in history. This collective is made up of musicians from all along the great river that connects 11 countries and over 400 million people – a region marred by political and ecological conflicts.

Using music as a springboard, the Nile Project inspires, educates, and empowers stakeholders to collectively work towards the sustainability of their shared ecosystem.

And they play extraordinary music.

Tickets are available online, at Ticket Central, or by phone 919.515.1100.
Click here to learn how you can save up to 25% on tickets!
$30  |  NC State students $7.50

Arrive early for a pre-show discussion with Mina Girgis, co-founder of The Nile Project.
6:30pm, Room 3222, Talley Student Union

Click here for full list of Nile Project events.


Film Screening: “Under the Same Sun” with Sameh Zoabi in attendance

February 15, 2017 ” />

The film is set in the near future and it looks back on how peace was made between Israelis and Palestinians. It is the story of two businessmen – one Palestinian and one Israeli – who struggle to set up a solar energy company. The film tells how they handle the hostility for collaboration from their respective communities. Filmmaker, Sameh Zoabi, will be in attendance. This event is the second in a series titled: “Language and Cultural Encounters: Arabs & Jews.” Parking is available in Cobb Deck. For more information, please email Hanna Sprintzik at Hannasp@email.unc.edu.

This event is sponsored by the Department of Asian Studies, the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, the UNC Program for Peace, War, and Defense, Carolina Seminars, and the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies.


Lecture and Seminar with James McDougall

February 15, 2017 ” />

Public Lecture: “The Sacred Space of France, Race, Religion, Citizenship and Empire”

Tuesday, February 21 | 12:00pm-1:30pm 

229 Carr, East Camp 

 

Lunchtime Seminar

Wednesday, February 22 | 11:30am – 1:00pm

Ahmadieh Family Conference Room

101 West Duke Bldg, East Campus

RSVP for the lunch here

 

Dr. James McDougall, Laithwaite Fellow and Tutor in Modern History at the University of Oxford, will be giving a public talk as well as participating in the Muslim Diasporas Seminar of the Religions and Public Initiative at the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke. Dr. McDougall’s current research is divided between two projects: one concerns “the everyday life of colonialism” and the after-effects of empire in France and Africa; he holds a Leverhulme Trust Major Research Fellowship for this project (2014-17); the other focuses on the global history of Islam since the eighteenth century. For more information about these events, please click here.


This spring, the Religions and Public Life Initiative at the Kenan Institute for Ethics in collaboration with FHI Humanities Futures and the Department of History, will host three scholars of Islamic and comparative studies. Each will give a public talk and participate in the Muslim Diasporas working group seminar during their visit. For more information, contact Bruce Hall, Ph.D. at
bh71@duke.edu.


Dr. Ali Al-Aufi: “How LIS in the Arab states is socially and intellectually organized”

February 17, 2017

Presenter: SILS Visiting Scholar Ali Al-Aufi, PhD

Abstract: The discipline of ‘library and information science’ has witnessed, for decades now, changes and debatable discussions about its social and intellectual organization. These epistemological changes share similarities as well as differences across the world. This talk will highlight issues that shape the status of library and information science in the context of the Arab states. It will highlight the characteristics of LIS in terms of social and intellectual organization, including aspects related to determination of terminology, institutional affiliation, accessibility to resources and funds, educational programs, employment, and access to jobs, as well as contemporary issues of scholarly communication. The talk opens discussion on whether these differences affect the international reputational autonomy of LIS, and whether more international collaboration can help alleviate the problems that constrain the development of LIS in the Arab states and elsewhere.

Bio: Ali Al-Aufi is a visiting scholar UNC School of Information and Library Science (SILS) for the year 2016/17. He comes from the Department of Information Studies, Sultan Qaboos University, Oman, where he is currently working in the position of associate professor. He received his MLIS from the University of Pittsburgh in 2001, and PhD in Information Management from Curtin University, Western Australia, in 2007. His research interests include information management, scholarly communication, social informatics and philosophy of LIS. During his scholarly visit at SILS, Al-Aufi has been conducting research in collaboration with Dean Gary Marchionini and others that investigates the Omani parliamentarians’ perception and utilization of social networking sites as information sources.

Location:Manning 208


Urdu Majlis

February 19, 2017 ” />

Please join for a meeting of the Triangle’s Urdu Literary Forum. This Urdu Majlis will concentrate on the life and works of Ali Sardar Jafri (1913-2000). The event will also have original poetry by participants and refreshments.

This event is free and open to the public. This event is co-sponsored by the Carolina Asia Center and the South Asia Section of the UNC Dept. of Asian Studies. Urdu Majlis is an intellectual endeavor with no political or religious affiliations. For more information, please contact Afroz Taj at taj@unc.edu.


The Parents Circle-Families Forum

February 19, 2017 ” />

Join North Carolina Hillel for the Parents Circle-Families Forum (PCFF). PCFF is a joint Palestinian and Israeli organization of over 600 families, all of whom have lost a close family member as a result of the prolonged conflict. The Parents Circle believes that we can only achieve peace by sharing our personal experiences. The event will bear witness to the personal pain of the conflict from an Israeli and a Palestinian member of the Parents Circle. For more information, please contact NC Hillel at (919) 942-4057.


Book Signing with Dr. Mateo Mohammad Farzaneh

February 19, 2017 ” />

In this book presentation, Prof. Farzaneh will discuss the role of Islamic jurisprudence in political reform in Iran. Throughout the 1800s, Iran was challenged to politically modernize in order to undo the failed policies of its corrupt/absolutist monarchical system. Introduction of Western-style constitutionalism by secular Iranians brought about the establishment of the Islamic world’s first parliament in Iran in 1906. However, that was the beginning of a long struggle between the proponents and the opponents of rule of law as a new political reality. This talk is based on Prof. Farzaneh’s new book, The Iranian Constitutional Revolution and the Clerical Leadership of Khurasani.

 

For more information, please click here or email Dr. Claudia Yaghoobi, Yaghoobi@email.unc.edu.


CANCELLED: Ambassador Maen Rashid Areikat: “The Palestinian-Israeli Conflict and the New US Administration”

February 19, 2017 ” />

Please note that this event has been cancelled, and is no longer occurring.

As the new US administration begins to interact with the Middle East region, and with Palestine and Israel specifically, what are some of the main challenges and potential successes Palestinians could face in the near future? What type of relationship can Palestinian leaders expect to have with the new administration? And what can be done to revive the political process and achieve peace? Ambassador Maen Rashid Areikat of the PLO Delegation to the Unites States will share his thoughts and answer questions from the audience. This presentation is part of the Krasno Professorship’s Ambassadors Forum, and will be moderated by Prof. Klaus Larres (Department of History).

 

For media-related and event-related inquiries, please contact MC VanGraafeiland (Media Relations Manager, Office of University Communication) at mc.vangraafeiland@unc.edu or at (919) 962-7090.

 

Co-sponsors: Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense, Department of History, and the Triangle Institute for Security Studies.


Persian Classical Music and Dance: in celebration of Khayyam

February 19, 2017 ” />

Persian Students Association at Duke & Persian Art Center in Carolina delightfully invite you for a cultural night with Persian classical music & dance! This event honors Omar Khayyam (1048–1131), a Persian polymath, scholar, mathematician, astronomer, philosopher, and poet. Performers include Siavash Pourfazli (tar, daf), Shahram Mazhari (santour, tombak), Reza Mahini (vocal, daf), Naim Montazeri (bass tar), Farzaneh Rezaei (dance).

 

Admission is free and open to public. Sponsored by the Duke Persian Students Association.  For more information, click here.


Understanding Islam and Muslims: A Panel Discussion for Graduate and Professional Students

February 20, 2017 ” />

Join the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations for a discussion about Islam and the variety of lived experiences of Muslim Americans. Panelists will answer FAQ’s, share personal experiences, discuss current challenges, and answer questions from participants. The event aims to help create a campus environment of understanding and inclusivity. As future professionals and academics who will shape the discourse in a variety of campus and professional communities surrounding issues of diversity, this will be a valuable workshop for graduate and professional school students. Please contact Emma Harver (harver@email.unc.edu) with questions.

 

Panelists include:

-Juliane Hammer, Associate Professor and Kenan Rifai Scholar of Islamic Studies, UNC -Department of Religious Studies
-Soumaya Lansari, UNC class of 2018, B.A Global Studies, Sociology

-Katie Merriman, PhD candidate in Islamic Studies, UNC Department of Religious Studies
-Omid Safi, Director, Duke Islamic Studies Center and Professor, Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies

Dey Hall, 206

Understanding Islam and Muslims

Save


UNC Nowruz/Persian New Year Celebration

February 20, 2017 ” />

Join the Persian Cultural Society for their annual Nowruz/Persian New Year Celebration on Sunday, March 26th from 5:30-9:30PM in the Great Hall of the Student Union. Enjoy a full course dinner buffet (catered by Flame Kabob), performances, DJ, dancing, and more!

Tickets are  $12/student, $25/non-student. Early-bird discounted prices through February! Click here to purchase tickets.

Please also join UNC Libraries for “UNC’s Persian Library Collections and Scholarship” from 4:30-5:30pm in the Art Gallery of the Union. Admission is free.

For more information, please click here.

 

Great Hall of the Student Union


Global Projects Showcase Lunch

February 22, 2017 ” />

Want to travel next summer? Looking to fund your global project?

Enjoy a showcase of students’ research, experiences and travel stories from a variety of fields and global destinations. Learn more about past international summer projects the Center for Global Initiatives has funded from the students themselves. Lunch will be provided.

This showcase will feature the following speaker and additional speakers TBD:

Jalyn McNeal, Global Studies major, Passport to Go! awardee and Foreign Language and Area Studies Award recipient who studied Arabic in Morocco

For more information, please contact cgi@unc.edu or visit this link.

Location: Student Union, room 3102


Tournées Film Festival

February 27, 2017 ” />

Please join the Department of Romance Studies for their two-week festival of new French films. The festival is free and open to the public, and refreshments will be served before each film. Movies are in French with English subtitles. Two MENA-related films are highlighted below:

 

La Cour De Babel (School of Babel)

Monday, February 27 | doors at 6:30pm, film at 7:00pm

This film follows a year in a Paris schoolroom for children who have recently immigrated to France from Africa, Asia, and South America. Using an intimate fly-on-the-wall style, the documentary gives us unforgettable glimpses into the lives of tweens and teens who have come to France for reasons ranging from studying violin at the Paris conservatory to escaping genital excision.

 

Qu’Allah bénisse la France! (May Allah Bless France!)

Tuesday, March 7 | doors at 6:30pm, film at 7:00pm

A film by a French rapper and novelist of Congolese origin, which recounts a coming-of-age story based on his experience growing up in a Muslim family in the projects outside of Strasbourg. Régis is a budding rapper who relies on petty crime to fund his passion for music. While his fellow musicians get lured into drug dealing, teenage Régis finds salvation in classic French literature and his conversion to Sufi Islam. Shot in black and white, this tale of redemption revisits the “banlieue film” and breaks with the genre’s suffocating pessimism.

 

The series is sponsored by the Department of Romance Languages, The Center for European Studies, the Carolina Asia Center, the African Studies Center, and the Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations.

 

Nelson Mandela Auditorium, FedEx Global Education Center

UNC-Chapel Hill


Forum on Refugees/Immigration

February 27, 2017 ” />

The Newman Catholic Center will hold a forum led by experts from UNC for us to understand the various issues related to refugees and immigration currently happening in our country. Besides learning about these issues, we will also explore how they impact the UNC community, how we might be able to respond through words and actions to support the UNC community members.

 

If you plan on attending, please take a moment to register here. Please contact the Newman Center for more information.

 

Newman Catholic Center


An evening of Arabic Music with Samy Youssef

February 27, 2017 ” />

Samy Youssef is an award-winning Arabic musician, composer, and singer (best Arabic Song in America by ANA 1998 with Moroccan female singer Malika). His style is sixties, Franco-Arab, European, American and Mediterranean oldies. Samy sings in English, French, Spanish, Italian, and Arabic. He also plays music with his own instruments and creates different varieties of Arabic songs. He will come for an Arab night with his wonderful Arabic songs on March 3. Also, former and current Arabic students will perform singing and winners in the competition will receive honorarium awards.

 

This event is sponsored by the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies and the Department of Asian Studies. For more information, please contact Farida Badr [fbadr@email.unc.edu]here.

 

FedEx Global Education Center


Jewish Food in the Global South

February 27, 2017 ” />

Please join the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies for their symposium on Jewish food in the Global South. Events are listed below:

 

Cooking Class at Southern Season

Saturday, March 4 | 11:00am

Author of “Quiches, Kugels and Couscous: My Search for Jewish Cooking in France” and ten other cookbooks, Joan Nathan is an award winning author and joins us to celebrate the upcoming May release of her latest title. Pre-registration is required. There are a limited number of seats are available, so register soon!

 

Film Festival at the Varsity

Saturday, March 4 | 4:00pm

Join us for an evening film screening of two Jewish food films: Deli-Man and Streit’s Matzo and the American Dream. The screenings will be from 4-7pm, with Streit’s Matzo starting a 4pm and Deli-Man starting at 5:30pm. This event is free and open to the public, no tickets or registration required. Screenings will be at the Varsity Theatre, 123 East Franklin Street, Chapel Hill. Film details and trailers here.

 

Symposium at FedEx Global Education Center, UNC Chapel Hill

Sunday, March 5 | 9:30am – 6:30pm

Pre-registration is required. The symposium is $10 for community members, which includes lunch, evening reception and morning and afternoon breaks. Details and Registration are linked.

 

This event is sponsored by the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies. Email  jewishstudies@unc.edu with questions.

 

FedEx Global Education Center


Docunight Film Screening: Sohrab, A Journey

February 27, 2017 ” />

In 1969, a young man of 26 years of age returns to his country Iran after years of studying cinema and going through the hardship of living abroad as a university student. He does not want to become a filmmaker in the commercial and valueless cinema of that time, so he chooses a different and – of course – a very hard path for the making of his films. The result of the daring choice is the two features A Simple Event and Still Life, which are remembered today as the most important and most influential first examples of the formation of the Iranian modern cinema. The pioneer filmmaker is nobody but Sohrab Shahid Saless. But how he succeeded in the making of the unconventional films? And how are his films related to the vicissitude in his life? Directed by Omid Abdollahi | 2016 / 77 min | Persian with English Subtitles.

 

Hosted by the Graduate Student Association of Iranians at Duke.  For more information, visit here.

 

John Hope Franklin Center, Ahmadieh Family Conference Hall, Room 240


Banning Burqas: A View from Postsecular Comparative Law – Ralf Michaels, Arthur Larson Professor of Law at Duke Law School

February 27, 2017 ” />

When France banned Islamic face veils in 2010, many considered this a French eccentricity. Now more and more countries are enacting, or at least considering, similar legislation. Taking the perspective of post-secular comparative law, the lecture looks at the ways in which Western legal systems understand and construct religious law and their own relation to it.  Lunch will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Co-sponsored by the Center for International & Comparative Law and the Office of the Law School Dean.

 

For more information, visit here or contact Ali Prince.

 

Duke Law School, Room 2041


CANCELLED: Public Lecture: “Two-State Solution vs. One-State Solution”

February 27, 2017 ” />

Please note that this event has been cancelled, and is no longer occurring.

Perhaps one of the most resounding questions in resolving the Israel-Palestine conflict is the configuration which any potential state would take. The Two-State Solution, proposing an independent Palestinian state adjacent to Israel, perhaps with a change in borders, has its proponents. Others advocate a One-State Solution, in which the Palestinian territories are fully integrated into Israel and Palestinians are extended the full legal rights of Israeli citizens. Though neither solution can be definitively declared superior, the pros and cons of each merit discussion.

 

This event is co-sponsored by the Duke Political Science Department, The Sanford School for Public Policy, and the Duke University Middle East Studies Center. For more information, click here, visit our website, or email mideast@duke.edu.

 

Social Sciences Room 139, West Campus


Meet your Fellow American Muslims

February 27, 2017 ” />

We open our doors with open hearts to have you at our annual open house. Here you will be able to meet your fellow American Muslim neighbors.  In addition you will have the opportunity to hear the call for prayer, observe one of the daily prayers, as well as hear Quran recitation by children, and meet the local Imam.  We are also proud to provide you with an opportunity to ask local scholars any question you may have about Islam.  This event will be educational and family friendly. The event is sponsored by the Islamic Center of Raleigh. For more information, visit www.islam1.org.

 

Islamic Center of Raleigh

808 Atwater Street

Raleigh, NC 27607


MarHaba مرحبا for Syrian Families

March 2, 2017 ” />

We are happy to welcome you to a fun gathering for the children of new the Syrian immigrants (refugees) and their families. Lots of fun activities are waiting including: Art & Crafts, Music and Songs, ARABIC Books for ALL ages, and Games. Volunteers are needed! Please sign up on this Google Doc if you would like to volunteer. Please contact Doria el Kerdany doriayk@gmail.com at with questions.

 

New West, room 219

UNC-Chapel Hill


Unani Medicine in India: Early Families, Colonial Contestations and Modern Practice

March 2, 2017 ” />

Join the South Asia Working Group for a talk by Professor Stewart Gordon, Senior Research Scholar at the South Asia Center of the University of Michigan. He has spent significant time travelling and researching in India. His dizzying range of research interests, his prolific publication output and his interest in developing new pedagogical techniques for teaching about South Asia and the world, will be of interest not only to faculty and students interested in Islamicate South Asia and alternative medical traditions, but also a wider audience.

 

C-sponsored by: The History Department, Carolina Asia Center, Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, The Department of Social Medicine and The Moral Economies of Medicine Group, UNC Anthropology Department.

 

105 Caldwell Hall
UNC-Chapel Hill


A Musical Evening with Samy Youssef

March 2, 2017 ” />

Samy Youssef is an award-winning Arabic Musician, composer and singer (best Arabic Song in America by ANA 1998 with Moroccan female singer Malika). Samy’s style is sixties, Franko-Arab, European, American and Mediterranean oldies. Samy sings in English, French, Spanish, Italian, and Arabic. He also plays music with his own instruments and creates different varieties Arabic songs.

 

Mr. Youssef’s event sponsored by Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, the Duke University Middle East Studies Center and the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies. For more information, click here.

 

John Hope Franklin Center, Ahmadieh Family Conference Hall, Room 240

Duke University


Shadows of Devotion MFA|EDA Thesis Exhibition, Salima Al-Ismaili

March 2, 2017 ” />

Shadows of Devotion is a look into the blurred lines of women’s gender roles as leaders in Islam. The exhibit includes a documentary photography series Nests of the Nu Ahong that journeys into nusi (women-only mosques) in China’s Henan province. The images work to capture the prayer and community of the elderly women that are served by nusi along with their women leaders known as nu ahongNests of the Nu Ahong is presented with an installation piece من وراء  حجاب: From Behind a Veil” and a video performance “prayers”. Both pieces are personal explorations into women’s feminine spirituality. On view March 3-14, 2017.

 

For more information, click here.

 

Opening Reception March 3 | 5:00 pm
Power Plant Gallery, American Tobacco Campus – Duke University


Redefining Leadership with Dr. Alaa Murabit

March 2, 2017 ” />

Join DISC, the Center for Muslim Life, and Dr. Alaa Murabit as she speaks on redefining leadership in our current times. Alaa Murabit is a UN High-Level Commissioner for Health Employment and Economic Growth, one of only 17 Sustainable Development Goal Global Advocates appointed by the UN Secretary General and a MIT Media Lab Director’s Fellow. She was recently named a 2017 “Forbes 30 Under 30” for her work in global health policy.  An Ashoka Fellow, Alaa is the youngest Marisa Bellisario International Humanitarian Award recipient, New York Times “International TrustWomen Hero 2014”, Newsweek’s “25 under 25 to watch”, a BBC “100 Top Woman” and SAFE Global Hero. Alaa received her medical degree from the University of Zawia, she went on to receive a Masters in International Strategy and Diplomacy with Distinction from the London School of Economics.

 

For more information, visit here or contact Julie Maxwell at julie.maxwell@duke.edu.

 

Perkins Library, Room 217

Duke University


Students: Advocacy Lunch with Dr. Alaa Murabit

March 2, 2017 ” />

DISC and the Center for Muslim Life invite you to come and join Dr. Alaa Murabit for a Student Advocacy Workshop. Dr. Alaa Murabit will teach students skills to advocate for themselves and the community. Lunch will be served.

 

This event is open to undergraduate and graduate students – to participate please fill out the following Qualtrics form here.

 

Duke West Campus
Duke University


Egypt and the Contradictions of Liberalism: Illiberal Intelligentsia and the Future of Egyptian Democracy

March 2, 2017 ” />

*edited by Dalia Fahmy and Daanish Faruqi

 

Please join us for a roundtable on our colleague Daanish Faruqi’s new edited book called Egypt and the Contradictions of Liberalism: Illiberal Intelligentsia and the Future of Egyptian Democracy (London: Oneworld Press, 2017).

 

Daanish Faruqi, PhD Student in History, will present the book, and then Frances Hasso and Michael Hardt will provide commentaries based on their readings of it, followed by an open discussion.

 

RSVP for the lunch and a copy of the book (as available) here!

 

Note: Copies of the book are only available for those committed to attending this roundtable discussion.

 

Ahmadieh Family Conference Room 101 West Duke Bldg, East Campus

Duke University


Conference: Middle East and North African Migration Studies in a Time of Crisis

March 6, 2017 ” />

The Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies will host an international scholarly conference on Middle East and North African migration on April 21 & 22, 2017. The conference will be held at North Carolina State University (Raleigh, North Carolina, USA) in  Withers Hall, Room 331.

This conference will consider the problematics of studying human movement to, from, and within the Middle East and North Africa in a time of mass displacement and multiple refugee “crises.” The region has long been defined by conflict and danger; conceived of as a place of flight and exile and expulsion, it has been imagined as the distorted obverse of a “Europe” or “America” imagined as spaces of refuge and safety. It is clear, then, that scholars working on Middle Eastern and North African migrations have much to contribute to discussions prompted by the wave of displacements the region is currently witnessing, from Syria and Iraq to Yemen and Libya.

Panelists will focus on three axes. The first considers contemporary flows of refugees, displaced peoples and migrants, and the varying responses that states and non-governmental organizations have developed to deal with people in movement. The second examines past patterns of Middle Eastern and North African movement (forced or voluntary), and the ways in which studying these may aid our understanding of the current moment. Conversely, the last of these axes concentrates on the ways in which the crisis in movement we are currently witnessing may pose new questions and methodological and theoretical challenges for scholars interested in mobility, compelling us to revise our understanding of Middle Eastern and North African migrations and to refashion the tools we use to examine these flows.

There is a limited number of seats available for non-panelists who wish to attend the conference. To attend, you will need to register here. The deadline for registering is Monday, April 10 by 5 PM.

For non-NC State students, faculty and staff the registration fee is $35, and we can only accept checks; payment has to be received by April 10th for us to reserve your spot.

Checks should be made out to:

  • NC State Foundation; and the Memo Line on the check should read: Khayrallah Center

Mail your check to:

Ms. Kristen Porter
Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies
Withers Hall 332, Campus Box 8013
NCSU
Raleigh, NC 27695

For more information and the full program, please visit https://lebanesestudies.ncsu.edu/Conferences/2017.php.


Poetry Reading from “Nomadologies” by Erdağ Göknar

March 6, 2017 ” />

Award-winning translator and Turkish scholar Erdağ Göknar comes to The Regulator for a reading and book signing of his new collection of poetry, Nomadologies.

The poems in Nomadologies connect moments of separation and union in a life lived between Turkey and America. Taking its organizing principle from the grammar of nomadic life, Nomadologies reveals that mobility is the most efficient strategy for sustaining contradictory existences. Here, we learn that poetry is a landscape of inhabitation, and perpetual exile is one’s home.

“Göknar takes us on a dazzling virtual world tour encompassing history, aesthetics, and politics, from Bosnia to Chechnya to the Silk Road to Union Square and back to the place that was once the center of the civilized world, Istanbul/Constantinople.” —Richard Tillinghast, author of An Armchair Traveller’s History of Istanbul

Erdağ Göknar is a scholar, writer, and translator. He is best known for his award-winning translation of Nobel laureate Orhan Pamuk’s novel My Name Is Red. He is a faculty member at Duke University where he researches, teaches, and writes on Turkish Studies.

For more information about the event, please visit here: http://www.regulatorbookshop.com/event/erda%C4%9F-g%C3%B6knar-nomadologies.


Global Leaders Foreign Policy Lunch & Learn: Refugees & North Carolina

March 8, 2017 ” />

Please join Go Global NC on Monday, March 27 for an insightful and educational discussion on the refugee crisis in the Middle East and Europe, the refugee admissions and resettlement process, the current composition and status of North Carolina’s refugee communities, and the history of Middle East-origin refugees in North Carolina. 

 

Since 2008, Go Global NC (formerly the Center for International Understanding) has been at the forefront in preparing North Carolina legislators, business executives, and community leaders to address issues of strategic importance to our state. Through intensive programs, leaders representing multiple sectors gain insight into global best practices. Global Leaders will continue this effort through quarterly foreign policy lunch-and-learn events, beginning with this March 27 discussion on the refugee crisis and North Carolina.

11:30 a.m.: Buffet Lunch Begins
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.: Panel Discussion

Register today, as seating capacity for this unique event is extremely limited. 


Panelists: 

 

Janet Cowell – Corporate Director; Former NC State Treasurer (2009-2016)

Ms. Cowell will share reflections on her recent experience volunteering with Syrian refugees in Jordan and Germany. 

 

Dr. Akram Khater – Director, Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies, NC State University 

Dr. Khater completed a PBS documentary on the history of the Lebanese community in North Carolina and is the senior curator for an exhibit on the same topic at the NC Museum of History.

 

Dr. Scott Phillips – Field Office Director, U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants

A native North Carolinian, Dr. Phillips joined the USCRI North Carolina Field Office in November 2015. Before taking on this role, Dr. Phillips worked in the fields of Community Development, Civil Rights, and Advocacy for about 15 years. 

 

Moderator: 

Cris Mulder Charbonneau – Vice President of Communications & Marketing, KnowledgeWorks 

 

A catered buffet lunch from Mediterranean Deli, including vegetarian options, will be provided beginning at 11:30 a.m. The speaker program will begin promptly at noon.


The Persian Art Center in Carolina Presents: A Nowruz Celebration

March 9, 2017 ” />

Please join the Persian Art Center in Carolina for an evening of Persian music in honor of the Persian New Year. The program will begin with a social from 4-4:30pm, followed by a welcome and introduction by Dr. Amir Rezvani. Live Persian music and poetry will follow from 5:00-7:30pm with a break for refreshments. The door will be closed upon the start of the program: please be on time!

 

The Persian Art Center in Carolina honors, respects and promotes Freedom of speech and expression. For more information, please contact 919-259-0959.

 

Duke University West Campus, Divinity School, Room 152


Panel Event: Environmental Futures in the Middle East

March 9, 2017 ” />

Environmental insecurities are increasingly part of the political landscape in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Citizens throughout the MENA experience a lack of access to water and sanitation, protracted drought, and conflict with links to natural resources. Speakers will address how they imagine environmental future in the MENA, taking into account climate change impacts on water resources, the role of environmental activists, human security, and ecosystem health. Speakers include Neda Zawahei, Associate Professor of Political Science at Cleveland State University, and Jeannie Sowers, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of New Hampshire. Erika S. Weinthal, Lee Hill Snowdon Professor of Environmental Policy at Duke University, will moderate. The event is open to the public and will be followed by a reception. Please click here for more information.

 

This event is sponsored by the Nicholas School of the Environment, the Humanities Futures Initiative at the John Hope Franklin Humanities Initiative, the Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Initiative, and the Duke University Middle East Studies Center.

 

Field Auditorium, Environment Hall

Duke University


Europe Week Film Screening and Q&A: Fire at Sea

March 16, 2017 ” />

Join us for an introduction by Dr. John Pickles, Earl N Phillips Distinguished Professor of International Studies in the UNC Department of Geography, and the film afterwards.

About Fire at Sea: An Academy Award® nominee for Best Documentary Feature and the first nonfiction film to ever win the top prize at the Berlin International Film Festival, Fire at Sea takes place in Lampedusa, a remote Mediterranean island that has become a major entry point for refugees into Europe. There, we meet Samuele, a 12-year-old boy who lives simply, climbing rocks by the shore and playing with his slingshot. Nearby, we bear witness as thousands of men, women, and children risk their lives to make the brutal crossing from Africa. Award-winning filmmaker Gianfranco Rosi masterfully juxtaposes these realities, jolting the audience into a new understanding of what is happening in the region, the heavy toll of the migrant crisis, and the price of freedom.

Sponsored by the Center for European Studies and cosponsored by the TransAtlantic Masters Program, The Contemporary European Studies Major, Erasmus+, African Studies Center, Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, and the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies.

Location: Nelson Mandela Auditorium, FedEx Global Education Center

Fire at Sea


Public Talk: ““Against All Odds: Access of Refugee Youth to Higher Education” with Gül İnanç

March 16, 2017 ” />

What is the cost of learning for refugee youth? On April 5, scholar Gül İnanç will give context to the question as part of a talk hosted by the Kenan Institute for Ethics.

From 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. April 5, İnanç will present “Against All Odds: Access of Refugee Youth to Higher Education” in the Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, West Duke 101. The talk will focus on the current situation of refugees and their access to education in the Southeast Asia, where primary and secondary school attendance levels among transit migrants is very low and even lower for vocational and higher education attendance.

This creates a particular challenge, İnanç said, as those wishing to continue their formal education can neither afford it, nor be accepted as students into many higher education institutions due to their legal status.

As the founder of Open Universities for Refugees, Inanc works to support access of forcibly displaced people into higher education in the region and is working with the refugees in West Java and Kuala Lumpur partnering with the United Nations Refugee Agency. Additional efforts are being considered to Introduce new criteria for university ranking systems on the basis of ethics of global higher education and of humanitarian interference.

İnanç is a lecturer at Nanyang Technological University ‘s School of Art, Design and Media in Singapore. Her areas of interest and expertise include: modern diplomatic history of West Asia, history and intercultural education for peace. In 2004 she headed a team which re-wrote the history text book for high school education in North Cyprus. In 2007, she was the first Turkish scholar to teach simultaneously at the University of and Eastern Mediterranean University.

Sponsored by the Kenan Institute for Ethics. For more information, please visit http://kenan.ethics.duke.edu/blog/access-refugee-youth-higher-education-april-5/.


Lecture: “What drives U.S. foreign policy on the Palestine Israel conflict?” with Prof. Stephen Zunes (University of San Francisco)

March 17, 2017 ” />

Stephen Zunes, PhD, Professor of Politics and International Studies at the University of San Francisco, serves as coordinator of the program in Middle Eastern Studies. Recognized as one the country’s leading scholars of U.S. Middle East policy and of strategic nonviolent action, Professor Zunes serves as a senior policy analyst for the Foreign Policy in Focus project of the Institute for Policy Studies, an associate editor of Peace Review, a contributing editor of Tikkun, and a member of the academic advisory council for the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict.  Event is free and open to the public.
This event is hosted by UNC-CH Students for Justice in Palestine, with co-sponsors: The Coalition for Peace with Justice and Balance and Accuracy in Journalism. For more information, please contact the Coalition for Peace with Justice at cpwj.contact@gmail.com  or 919-399 0673.

 

Bingham Hall, room 103

UNC Chapel Hill


Lecture: “U.S. Policy towards Israel/Palestine and Fading Hopes for a Two-State Solution” with Prof. Stephen Zunes (University of San Francisco)

March 17, 2017 ” />

For nearly a quarter century, the United States has played the contradictory role of chief mediator in Israeli-Palestinian peace talks and the primary diplomatic, economic, and military supporters of the more powerful of the two parties. During this period, the United States has opposed substantive involvement by the United Nations, insisting that whether and to what extent the occupation should end could come only through the voluntary assent of the occupying power. Now, with the failure of the Trump administration and Congressional leaders to even nominally support a viable two-state solution, what options remain for Israeli-Palestinian peace?

 

Dr. Stephen Zunes is a Professor of Politics and International Studies at the University of San Francisco, where he serves as coordinator of the program in Middle Eastern Studies. Recognized as one the country’s leading scholars of U.S. Middle East, Professor Zunes is a prolific author of books and articles for both scholarly and general readership.

 

For more information, click here or contact Julie Maxwell.

 

Ahmadieh Family Conference Hall, JHFC Rm 240

Duke University


Conference: Islam and Muslims in Media

March 17, 2017 ” />

In today’s political climate, how are Islam and Muslims portrayed in the media?  Duke Islamic Studies Center and the Carengie Corporation of New York sponsor this in-depth conference featuring insights and commentary from top journalists Mehdi Hasan, David Graham, and Abigail Hauslohner.

 

For more information, click here or contact Julie Maxwell.

 

Rubenstein 153 (Holsti-Anderson)

Duke University


Symposium on Muslim African Intellectual History

March 17, 2017 ” />

Please mark your calendars and join us in hosting a number of African scholars on Monday, March 27th, 2:00-5:00 for a small symposium on Muslim African intellectual history. Ousmane Kane, Harvard University will deliver the keynote, “Beyond Timbuktu: an intellectual history of Muslim West Africa.” This will be followed by a panel and discussion. Please click here for more information and the full schedule.

 

This event is sponsored by the History Department, Religions and Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, The African Initiative, and the Humanities Futures of the FHI.

 

Ahmadieh Family Conference Room 101 West Duke Bldg.
Duke University


The United States Mission in Afghanistan: A View from the Special Inspector General for Afghan Reconstruction

March 17, 2017 ” />

 

John Sopko, Special Inspector General of Afghanistan Reconstruction, will speak at the Sanford School of Public Policy on Thursday, March 23. His discussion with Professor David Schanzer on “The United States Mission in Afghanistan: A View from the Special Inspector General for Afghan Reconstruction,” is free and open to the public. Mr. Sopko, who has held the position of Inspector General since 2012, will provide his insights on the United States’ experience in Afghanistan and will speak about the obstacles to success and the strategic challenges of this war, now the longest in United States history.

 

For more information, click here or contact Katy Fanning. Sponsored by the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security and Sanford School of Public Policy.

 

Sanford 03

Duke University


Lecture: “Trade and Family in the Middle East: A Private Archive from Upper Egypt” with Dr. Terence Walz

March 17, 2017 ” />

 

Dr. Terence Walz is pioneering in studying “The al-Jawhari Papers” which is the only private cache of documents from nineteenth-century Upper Egypt surfaced so far. This is a small archive of family papers belonging to the al-Jawhari family of Asyut who were prominent in the trade of Upper Egypt between 1830 and 1865. They traded primarily in grain between the river towns of Upper Egypt and Cairo but they also dealt in Sudanese goods that came to the city via caravans from Darfur and Kordofan. The cache of documents sheds light on the workings of non-state Egyptian commerce during this period of economic and social change as well as on the inner workings of the trans-Saharan trade. This talk is presented by the Program Archives of Africa, Asia, and the Mediterranean, History Department.

 

For more information, please visit here. Co-sponsored by: David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Triangle Seminar on the Histories of Muslim Societies & Communities.

 

West Duke 101 – Ahmadieh Family Conference Room

Duke University


Opening Reception: Capturing the Moment: Centuries of the Passover Haggadah (An Exhibit from the Collections of the Duke University Libraries)

March 17, 2017 ” />

Duke University Libraries invite you to the opening reception featuring Professor Kalman Bland (Duke Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies) for an exhibit of the Passover Haggadah, a Jewish text written for the Passover Seder meal.  This exhibit explores the long and interesting history of the Haggadot (pl. of Haggadah) and how their illustrations and texts shed light on cultural, religious and political changes.

 

For more information contact meg.brown@duke.edu.  This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Jewish Studies and the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation. Parking available at the Bryan Center Garage.

 

The Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room, Rubenstein Library

Duke University


Dare to Dream: An Educational Conference on Peace and Justice

March 17, 2017 ” />

Rev. Dr. Mitri Raheb, native of Bethlehem, will host a weekend conference on peace and justice in Palestine. Internationally recognized for his work as an educator, author, advocate for human rights and peace, he brings an update on challenges in the aftermath of US elections and how his community strives to instill hope, improve lives and promote the richness of Palestinian heritage and culture through social support programs and institutions that educate from childhood through college.

 

This event is sponsored by Bright Stars of Bethlehem, Coalition for Peace with Justice, NCCC, New Hope Presbytery, Presbyterian Peacemaking Offering Committee and support from additional Triangle faith communities. For more information and RSVP assistance, please email Huffstetler.k@gmail.com. RSVP by March 20th.

 

Friday, March 24 | 6:15pm – 8:30pm

White Memorial Church, 1704 Oberlin Rd, Raleigh

 


Dare to Dream: An Educational Conference on Peace and Justice

March 17, 2017 ” />

 

Rev. Dr. Mitri Raheb, native of Bethlehem, will host a weekend conference on peace and justice in Palestine. Internationally recognized for his work as an educator, author, advocate for human rights and peace, he brings an update on challenges in the aftermath of US elections and how his community strives to instill hope, improve lives and promote the richness of Palestinian heritage and culture through social support programs and institutions that educate from childhood through college.

 

This event is sponsored by Bright Stars of Bethlehem, Coalition for Peace with Justice, NCCC, New Hope Presbytery, Presbyterian Peacemaking Offering Committee and support from additional Triangle faith communities. For more information and RSVP assistance, please email Huffstetler.k@gmail.com. RSVP by March 20th.

 

Church of Reconciliation, 110 N. Elliot Rd, Chapel Hill


Film Screening: The Common Link

March 17, 2017 ” />

 

The Common Link is a documentary project that that tells the stories of eight individuals living in Lebanon. It features people who have in some way transcended ethnic or religious boundaries to help one another – simply because of the one thing that connects us all: our shared humanity. Laila Knio, a senior Park Scholar born in Lebanon, traveled back to her birthplace to capture and share these stories: a Muslim Sheikh whose family provided flour to a blockaded Christian town during the Civil War; a peace activist; a rescue diver and film-maker; the sole Arab recipient, to date, of the Albert Pierce Medal for Heroism; a Palestinian physician known as the “mother of the poor,” and others.

 

For more information, click here.

 

Honors Village Commons, 2nd Floor Multipurpose Room

NC State University


Lecture: “A Spring without Flowers: Perennial Egypt” with Dr. Margot Badran

March 17, 2017 ” />

 

A look at Egypt and how social, cultural, and creative enterprises have flowed out of “revolution” as people, mainly youth, have been re-directing their energy and dreams from their days on the streets into fashioning new lives while holding onto their ideals.  Dr. Margot Badran is a recognized voice on Islamic feminism and its potential for furthering human rights and democracy. She is a Senior Fellow at the Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Center for Muslim Christian Understanding at Georgetown University and a senior scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington.

 

This event is sponsored by the Durham Tech Global Distinction Program with support from the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies.

 

Collins Auditorium, room 2-178

Durham Technical Community College


Full Frame Documentary Film Festival | Asiyeh

March 20, 2017 ” />

The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival is an annual international event dedicated to the theatrical exhibition of nonfiction cinema. Each spring, Full Frame welcomes filmmakers and film lovers from around the world to historic downtown Durham, North Carolina, for a four-day, morning-to-midnight array of nearly 100 films, as well as discussions, panels, and Southern hospitality. Set within a few city blocks, the intimate festival landscape fosters community and conversation among filmmakers, film professionals, and the public.

Asiyeh

An intelligent, no-nonsense bonesetter in northern Iran has been healing the people in her community for as long as anyone can remember.

Director: Leila Merat

Release Year: 2016

Festival Year: 2017

Country: Iran

Run Time:34 minutes

US Premiere

Location: Cinema 1 (for venue information, visit https://www.fullframefest.org/attend/venues/).


Full Frame Documentary Film Festival | The Botanist (ботаник)

March 20, 2017 ” />

The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival is an annual international event dedicated to the theatrical exhibition of nonfiction cinema. Each spring, Full Frame welcomes filmmakers and film lovers from around the world to historic downtown Durham, North Carolina, for a four-day, morning-to-midnight array of nearly 100 films, as well as discussions, panels, and Southern hospitality. Set within a few city blocks, the intimate festival landscape fosters community and conversation among filmmakers, film professionals, and the public.

The Botanist (ботаник)

This breathtaking short follows Raimberdi as he ingeniously constructs a hydroelectric generator to better survive in the mountains of Tajikstan.

Directors

Maude Plante-Husaruk, Maxime Lacoste-Lebuis

Original Title

ботаник

Release Year

2016

Festival Year

2017

Country

Canada

Run Time

20 minutes

Location: Cinema 4 (for venue information, visit https://www.fullframefest.org/attend/venues/).


Full Frame Documentary Film Festival | City of Ghosts

March 20, 2017 ” />

The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival is an annual international event dedicated to the theatrical exhibition of nonfiction cinema. Each spring, Full Frame welcomes filmmakers and film lovers from around the world to historic downtown Durham, North Carolina, for a four-day, morning-to-midnight array of nearly 100 films, as well as discussions, panels, and Southern hospitality. Set within a few city blocks, the intimate festival landscape fosters community and conversation among filmmakers, film professionals, and the public.

City of Ghosts

Captivating in its immediacy, City of Ghosts follows the journey of “Raqqa is Being Slaughtered Silently,” a group of anonymous Syrian activists who band together to document the Islamic State’s crimes after the city is taken by ISIS.

Director

Matthew Heineman

Release Year

2017

Festival Year

2017

Country

United States

Run Time

91 minutes

Location: Cinema 1 (for venue information, visit https://www.fullframefest.org/attend/venues/).


Full Frame Documentary Film Festival | I’M OKAY

March 20, 2017 ” />

The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival is an annual international event dedicated to the theatrical exhibition of nonfiction cinema. Each spring, Full Frame welcomes filmmakers and film lovers from around the world to historic downtown Durham, North Carolina, for a four-day, morning-to-midnight array of nearly 100 films, as well as discussions, panels, and Southern hospitality. Set within a few city blocks, the intimate festival landscape fosters community and conversation among filmmakers, film professionals, and the public.

I’M OKAY

Adult themes unfold through the perspective of young protagonists in this beautifully photographed feature that captures the experiences of two refugee families struggling to rebuild their lives in Germany.

Director

Pia Lenz

Release Year

2016

Festival Year

2017

Country

Germany

Run Time

95 minutes

Premiere

North American Premiere

Location: Cinema 3 (for venue information, visit https://www.fullframefest.org/attend/venues/).


Full Frame Documentary Film Festival: Last Men in Aleppo

March 20, 2017 ” />

The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival is an annual international event dedicated to the theatrical exhibition of nonfiction cinema. Each spring, Full Frame welcomes filmmakers and film lovers from around the world to historic downtown Durham, North Carolina, for a four-day, morning-to-midnight array of nearly 100 films, as well as discussions, panels, and Southern hospitality. Set within a few city blocks, the intimate festival landscape fosters community and conversation among filmmakers, film professionals, and the public.

Last Men in Aleppo

Urgent and harrowing, this film follows the White Helmets’ unrelenting efforts to save fellow Syrians. When air strikes devastate homes, they descend on the wreckage to rescue buried men, women, and children, refusing to leave their people or their city behind.

Director

Feras Fayyad

Release Year

2017

Festival Year

2017

Country

Denmark, Syria

Run Time

104 minutes

Location: Cinema 1 (for venue information, visit https://www.fullframefest.org/attend/venues/).


Full Frame Documentary Film Festival | Waiting for Hassana

March 20, 2017 ” />

The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival is an annual international event dedicated to the theatrical exhibition of nonfiction cinema. Each spring, Full Frame welcomes filmmakers and film lovers from around the world to historic downtown Durham, North Carolina, for a four-day, morning-to-midnight array of nearly 100 films, as well as discussions, panels, and Southern hospitality. Set within a few city blocks, the intimate festival landscape fosters community and conversation among filmmakers, film professionals, and the public.

Waiting for Hassana

Jessica, an escapee, recollects a friendship shattered by the 2014 kidnapping of 276 Nigerian girls by the Boko Haram.

Director

Ifunanya Maduka

Release Year

2017

Festival Year

2017

Country

Nigeria

Run Time

11 minutes

Location: Cinema 1 (for venue information, visit https://www.fullframefest.org/attend/venues/).


Full Frame Documentary Film Festival | Zaatari Djinn

March 20, 2017 ” />

The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival is an annual international event dedicated to the theatrical exhibition of nonfiction cinema. Each spring, Full Frame welcomes filmmakers and film lovers from around the world to historic downtown Durham, North Carolina, for a four-day, morning-to-midnight array of nearly 100 films, as well as discussions, panels, and Southern hospitality. Set within a few city blocks, the intimate festival landscape fosters community and conversation among filmmakers, film professionals, and the public.

Zaatari Djinn

This incandescent portrait documents four children in a refugee camp who are transformed by the light of imagination and possibility despite numerous hardships.

Director

Catherine van Campen

Release Year

2016

Festival Year

2017

Country

Netherlands

Run Time

91 minutes

Premiere

North American Premiere

Location: Fletcher (for venue information, visit https://www.fullframefest.org/attend/venues/).


Full Frame Documentary Film Festival | The Challenge

March 20, 2017 ” />

The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival is an annual international event dedicated to the theatrical exhibition of nonfiction cinema. Each spring, Full Frame welcomes filmmakers and film lovers from around the world to historic downtown Durham, North Carolina, for a four-day, morning-to-midnight array of nearly 100 films, as well as discussions, panels, and Southern hospitality. Set within a few city blocks, the intimate festival landscape fosters community and conversation among filmmakers, film professionals, and the public.

The Challenge

Miles of barren desert provide the backdrop for this surreal compilation of images: private jets, race cars, exquisite birds, and even a pet cheetah descend on the Qatar dunes to take part in a remote falconry tournament.

Director

Yuri Ancarani

Release Year

2016

Festival Year

2017

Country

France, Italy

Run Time

70 minutes

Location: Cinema 1 (for venue information, visit https://www.fullframefest.org/attend/venues/).


Full Frame Documentary Film Festival | Black Out

March 20, 2017 ” />

The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival is an annual international event dedicated to the theatrical exhibition of nonfiction cinema. Each spring, Full Frame welcomes filmmakers and film lovers from around the world to historic downtown Durham, North Carolina, for a four-day, morning-to-midnight array of nearly 100 films, as well as discussions, panels, and Southern hospitality. Set within a few city blocks, the intimate festival landscape fosters community and conversation among filmmakers, film professionals, and the public.

Black Out

School children in Guinea are willing to make enormous sacrifices for their education in hopes of escaping the circumstances of their parents. Determined to do well on their exams, but lacking electricity at home, many young students walk miles to study beneath the glow of parking lot, airport, and gas station lights. Eva Weber’s incredibly photographed film explores these surreal images of students who hit the books not in the quiet and comfort of a library but on the cold pavement of bizarre and makeshift urban study halls. More personally, Weber documents the hopes and circumstances of several individual children and the teacher who does his best to support their efforts. These accounts also reveal the danger of this nightly pilgrimage, which may or may not ultimately lead to a better life. ST

Director

Eva Weber

Producers

Claire Neate James, Kat Mansoor

Editors

Emiliano Battista, Eva Weber

Cinematographer

Mattias Nyberg

Release Year

2012

Festival Year

2013

Country

UK

Run Time

47 minutes

Premiere

North American Premiere

Location: DAC (for venue information, visit https://www.fullframefest.org/attend/venues/).


Lecture: “The Was and There Was Not: Public Space in the Chimerical City; Beirut, 1990-2006″ by Hannah Feldman, Northwestern University

March 23, 2017 ” />

Keynote Speakers for the 3rd Annual Art Student Graduate Organization Symposium: Art, Media and Social Unrest

Hasan Elahi, University of Maryland, College Park
“The New Normal”

AND

Hannah Feldman, Northwestern University
The Was and There Was Not: Public Space in the Chimerical City; Beirut, 1990-2006″

March 24, 2017, 4:00 PM
265 Phillips Hall


Elahi Bio

Hasan Elahi is an interdisciplinary artist working with issues in surveillance, privacy, migration, citizenship, technology, and the challenges of borders. Elahi’s work has been presented in numerous exhibitions at venues such as SITE Santa Fe, Centre Georges Pompidou, Sundance Film Festival, and at the Venice Biennale. Elahi has spoken to audiences as diverse as the Tate Modern, American Association of Artificial Intelligence, International Association of Privacy Professionals, TED Global, and the World Economic Forum. His work is frequently in the media and has appeared on Al Jazeera, Fox News, and on The Colbert Report. In addition to the Guggenheim Fellowship in 2016, his awards include grants from the Creative Capital Foundation in 2006 and Art Matters Foundation in 2011. In 2014, he was Artist-in-Residence at Shangri-La/Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art and in 2009, Resident Faculty at Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. He is currently Associate Professor of Art at University of Maryland, roughly equidistant from the CIA, FBI, and NSA headquarters.After an erroneous tip called into law enforcement authorities in 2002 subjected Elahi to an intensive investigation by the FBI and after undergoing months of interrogations, he was finally cleared of suspicions. After this harrowing experience, Elahi conceived “Tracking Transience” and opened just about every aspect of his life to the public. Predating the NSA’s PRISM surveillance program by half a decade, the project questions the consequences of living under constant surveillance and continuously generates databases of imagery that tracks the artist and his points of transit in real-time. Although initially created for his FBI agent, the public can also monitor the artist’s communication records, banking transactions, and transportation logs along with various intelligence and government agencies who have been confirmed visiting his website.

Elahi Abstract
Hasan Elahi is an interdisciplinary artist working with issues in surveillance, privacy, migration, citizenship, technology, and the challenges of borders. Elahi’s work has been presented in numerous exhibitions at venues such as SITE Santa Fe, Centre Georges Pompidou, Sundance Film Festival, and at the Venice Biennale. Elahi has spoken to audiences as diverse as the Tate Modern, American Association of Artificial Intelligence, International Association of Privacy Professionals, TED Global, and the World Economic Forum. His work is frequently in the media and has appeared on Al Jazeera, Fox News, and on The Colbert Report. In addition to the Guggenheim Fellowship in 2016, his awards include grants from the Creative Capital Foundation in 2006 and Art Matters Foundation in 2011. In 2014, he was Artist-in-Residence at Shangri-La/Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art and in 2009, Resident Faculty at Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. He is currently Associate Professor of Art at University of Maryland, roughly equidistant from the CIA, FBI, and NSA headquarters.

Feldman Bio

Hannah Feldman is Associate Professor of Art History at Northwestern University, where she is also core faculty in the Programs of Middle Eastern and North African Studies, the Program of Comparative Literary Studies, and affiliate faculty in the Department of Art Theory and Practice. The author of From a Nation Torn: Decolonizing Art and Representation in France, 1945–1962, she has also published widely on the intersections of art and violence in journals and magazines including Third Text, Artforumnka: the Journal of Contemporary African ArtArt JournalOctober, and Frieze, as well as in numerous international museum catalogues. For the years 2015-2017, she is an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation New Directions Scholar.

Feldman Abstract

Feldman’s talk borrows its title and conceptual framework from Jayce Salloum’s 1994 film, This is Not Beirut (There was and there was not), which consolidates 200 hours of the artist’s footage of Beirut in the 1990s to consider the centrality—and precarity—of Beirut as a symbol of the country’s emergence from seventeen years of civil and other wars. Jayce’s investigation of the image as a site of alterity provides an analytic for understanding the contests over public space that would emerge in Beirut throughout the next decade as arts initiatives took to the street, in theory reclaiming it as a site of dialogue and confrontation rather than violence and destruction. By focusing on the dynamics between art’s ambitions and their unintended consequences, this talk historicizes a trajectory of local art practices and provisional events meant to claim or constitute various forms of public belonging in the years before Catherine David’s famous “discovery” of contemporary art in Beirut, and the corresponding institutionalization of the “Beirut School” as a product for international consumption and lionization that reached its zenith following the 2006 Israeli invasion of Lebanon.

Co-sponsored by the Art Department, Communication Department, and the Institute for the Arts and Humanities

For more information, visit here or please contact Josh Smith at smit4758@live.unc.edu.

Location: 265 Phillips Hall


Lecture: The Kitāb al-turjumān: a chronicle of a controversial scholar with an exclusivist political discourse in 20th-century Mali by Professor Mohamed Shaid Mathee of University of Johannesburg

March 24, 2017 ” />

 

The Kitāb al-turjumān is a long and important twentieth-century Timbuktu chronicle, which deserves the attention of modern scholarship. Order and stability are pervasive themes of the chronicle. However, the chronicle’s author, Muḥammad Maḥmūd wuld al-Shaykh, a first-rated scholar trained in the Muslim religious-intellectual tradition, was a man marred by controversy. His personal and political ambitions did him no favour either, to the extent that even astonishing exaggerations about him abound. Furthermore, wuld al-Shaykh agitated vociferously against the incorporation of Northern Mali into a future independent black dominated Mali through numerous petitions to the French government and letters to “white” notables. This clearly exposed his discourse as racial. The Kitāb al-turjumān is, in no uncertain terms, a repository of all the above. Wuld al-Shaikh employed the Kitāb al-turjumān in the service of political objective. Wuld al-Shaykh’s favourable reception of the Saᶜdian Empire and the French colonial power and, although to a lesser extent, his treatment of his lineage/ancestry pervade the Kitāb al-turjumān. In this presentation, I focus on these two points. Whether the Kitāb al-turjumān, had an impact on the white separatist movements of Northern Mali that led to two major civil wars since Mali became an independent state in 1960 is for now speculation that nevertheless merits attention and scholarly probe.  Lunch with be served.

 

Sponsored by Duke History, the Africa Initiative, and Religions and Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics.

 

229 Carr

Duke University 


Full Frame Documentary Film Festival

March 24, 2017 ” />

 

The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival is an annual international event dedicated to the theatrical exhibition of nonfiction cinema. Each spring, Full Frame welcomes filmmakers and film lovers from around the world to historic downtown Durham, North Carolina, for a four-day, morning-to-midnight array of nearly 100 films, as well as discussions, panels, and Southern hospitality. There are several Middle East-related films this year. Please click the links below for more information.

 

Thursday, April 6 — 4:00 pm Cinema 1 | Asiyeh | An intelligent, no-nonsense bonesetter in northern Iran has been healing the people in her community for as long as anyone can remember.

Thursday, April 6 — 4:00 pm Cinema 1 | Waiting for Hassana | Jessica, an escapee, recollects a friendship shattered by the 2014 kidnapping of 276 Nigerian girls by the Boko Haram.

Friday, April 7 — 10:30 am Fletcher | Zaatari Djinn | This incandescent portrait documents four children in a refugee camp who are transformed by the light of imagination and possibility despite numerous hardships.

Friday, April 7 — 1:00 pm Cinema 1 | Last Men in Aleppo | Urgent and harrowing, this film follows the White Helmets’ unrelenting efforts to save fellow Syrians. When air strikes devastate homes, they descend on the wreckage to rescue buried men, women, and children, refusing to leave their people or their city behind.

Saturday, April 8 — 4:10 pm Cinema 4 | The Botanist | This breathtaking short follows Raimberdi as he ingeniously constructs a hydroelectric generator to better survive in the mountains of Tajikstan.

Saturday, April 8 — 4:20 pm Cinema 3 | I’M OKAY | Adult themes unfold through the perspective of young protagonists in this beautifully photographed feature that captures the experiences of two refugee families struggling to rebuild their lives in Germany.

Saturday, April 8 — 4:40 pm DAC | Black Out | School children in Guinea are willing to make enormous sacrifices for their education in hopes of escaping the circumstances of their parents.

Saturday, April 8 — 7:00 pm Cinema 1 | City of Ghosts | Captivating in its immediacy, City of Ghosts follows the journey of “Raqqa is Being Slaughtered Silently,” a group of anonymous Syrian activists who band together to document the Islamic State’s crimes after the city is taken by ISIS.

Saturday, April 8 — 10:00 pm Cinema 1| The Challenge| Miles of barren desert provide the backdrop for this surreal compilation of images: private jets, race cars, exquisite birds, and even a pet cheetah descend on the Qatar dunes to take part in a remote falconry tournament.

 

Venues


Chuck Hagel and Dan Bolger: “Who is the Enemy in the Middle East?”

March 24, 2017 ” />

Former U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel will join retired Army lieutenant general Dan Bolger, a teaching assistant professor in NC State’s Department of History, to discuss the ongoing conflicts in the Middle East. Chuck Hagel served as Secretary of Defense from 2013 – 2015 in the Obama administration. He served as a U.S. Senator from Nebraska from 1997 – 2009. He is the former chairman of the Atlantic Council; served on the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board (2009–2012); was a Distinguished Professor at Georgetown University; and co-founded Vanguard Cellular Systems, Inc. Chuck Hagel earned many military decorations and honors, including two Purple Hearts. Dan Bolger served for 35 years in the U.S. Army, earning five Bronze Star Medals (one for valor) and the Combat Action Badge. He is the author of several books, including Why We Lost:  A General’s Inside Account of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars (New York:  Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2015).

 

This event is sponsored by the Humanities and Social Sciences Department at NC State University. For more information, please click here.

 

Park Shops 210

NC State University


Wednesdays at the Center: “Iraqi Pioneer Art” with Dr. Nedda Ibrahim

March 24, 2017 ” />

The Iraqi Pioneer Art era began in the 1930s and flourished throughout the mid-century until its abrupt end in the 1990s. Dr. Ibrahim’s presentation will introduce the main pioneer artists of the movement, focus on the Iraqi diaspora’s artists, and on the impact of the current political situation towards the future of Iraq’s cultural heritage. Dr. Ibrahim’s grandfather, Mohammed Saleh Zeki, and uncle, Zaid Saleh Zeki, were both active in the Iraqi Pioneer art movement and instrumental in advancing the art of a past modern Iraq. Dr. Ibrahim’s late brother, Robert Kaye Ibrahim, and her son, Sami Drabick, have carried on the family tradition, exhibiting art throughout North Carolina. Dr. Ibrahim is a dentist by profession with a practice in Raleigh, NC. She teaches in the Department of Operative Dentistry at the University of North Carolina’s School of Dentistry. In the spring of 2016, Dr. Ibrahim organized the Iraqi Refugee Art Exhibit at William Peace University.

This presentation is sponsored by the John Hope Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary and International Studies and the Duke University Middle East Studies Center. A light lunch will be served. Parking is available in nearby Trent Rd. and Erwin Rd. parking decks. The series provides 1 hour parking vouchers to guests. For more information, click here.


Lecture: “The Algerian Remake: Kamel Daoud and Bouasalem Sansal” with Prof. Corbin Treacy (FSU)

March 24, 2017 ” />

This talk analyzes a trend in twenty-first century Algerian literature wherein authors rewrite canonical European works and situate them in Algeria. I focus on two examples by two controversial figures: Kamel Daoud and Boualem Sansal. Daoud’s Meursault, contre-enquête (2013), a retelling of Camus’s L’étranger from the point of view of the murdered Arab’s brother, was met with global critical acclaim and turned Daoud into something of a global literary celebrity. Sansal’s recently published 2084: La fin du monde (2015) uses Orwell’s 1984 as a template for an alarmist text that takes place in a post-apocalyptic hellscape ruled by an Islamist party that walks and talks a lot like ISIS. In both Daoud’s and Sansal’s novels, the power of the original-its place of reverence in the canon, its familiarity, its fan base-plays a powerful role in the text’s receptive and critical life. And yet these authors use their source material differently. The mobility granted these novels by the remake genre has fundamentally reoriented the flow of Algerian literary production, both at home and abroad, and calls us to question what it means when postcolonial texts simultaneously “write back” and “write for.” Reception to follow.

 

Sponsored by the Department of Romance Studies, the Duke University Middle East Studies Center, and the Center for French and Francophone Studies. For more information, click here or email Lauren Babineau.

 

Languages 114

Duke University


Lecture: “Muslim Women in the Balkans between Nationalism and Transnationalism” with Prof. Ina Merdjanova (Trinity College, Dublin)

March 24, 2017 ” />

In spite of the powerful secularization processes under communism and the ensuing transformation of religious institutions, authorities, practices, and levels of faith commitment, the religious factor remained an important cultural force and identity marker in the Balkans. Moreover, religious outlooks continued to shape and inform gender regimes.  Postcommunist developments in the Balkans brought about a significant redefinition of the roles and status of Muslim women—both in the Muslim communities themselves and in the larger societies. Drawing on literature from the region and on my own fieldwork, I will discuss the shifting roles of Muslim women in different spheres of life such as the family, religious education and the public arena under national and transnational Islamic influences.
Ina Merdjanova is a senior researcher and an adjunct assistant professor in religious studies at the Irish School of Ecumenics, Trinity College Dublin. She is currently a Visiting Fellow at the Remarque Institute at NYU.
This event is co-sponsored by the Duke Middle East Studies Center, the Duke Council for European Studies, and International Comparative Studies at Duke University. For more information, click here or visit our webpage.

 

Pink Parlor, East Duke Building, East Campus
Duke University


Lecture | “Translation as an Ideological State Apparatus: The Universal Library of the Turkish Cultural Revolution” with Dr. Fırat Oruç, Georgetown University- Qatar

March 24, 2017 ” />

Dr. Fırat Oruç Firat Oruc is Assistant Professor of English and Humanities at Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatar. He received his Ph.D. in Literature from Duke University in 2010. His teaching specialties include contemporary global literature, 20th century Anglophone writing, literatures of the Middle East, and world cinema. His current book project is a comparative study of world literature and institutions of translation in Turkey, Egypt, and Iran.

 

This talk is presented by the Carolina Seminar on Global and Modern Transnational History

and Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations.

 

FedEx Global Education Center, Room 2008

UNC Chapel Hill


Conference: “Performing Commemoration: Musical Reenactment and the Politics of Trauma”

March 24, 2017 ” />

At the heart of this project lies the question: What is it to perform commemoration? Many musicologists and ethnomusicologists over the past few decades have attended to the performative dimension of commemorative activity—through such critical lenses as national and transnational cultures, the transfer of social memory, and the relation between individual and collective expression in music. In this conference, we ask what it is to think of commemoration as a performed mode of remembrance, and how the commemorative mode serves the ends of socialization and public power. Two panels that focus on the Middle East are listed below:

 

Sylvia Alajaji: “Music and the Mediation of Remembrance: Reflections on the Commemoration of the Centennial of the Armenian Genocide” (Franklin and Marshall College)

Saturday, April 1 | 9:30am – 10:15am

 

Michael A. Figueroa: “Musical Memory, Animated Amnesia: Traumatic Soundscapes in Waltz with Bashir” (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

Saturday, April 1 | 10:15am – 11:00am

 

For more information, directions and parking, and the list of sponsors, please click here.

 

Department of Music

UNC-Chapel Hill


23rd Annual Carolina Conference for Romance Studies: Dia.gnosis

March 24, 2017 ” />

The Graduate Romance Association of the Department of Romance Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill would like to welcome professors, students, and independent scholars to the Carolina Conference for Romance Studies. Over the past twenty-two years, our conference has grown tremendously and is now one of the largest conferences in the country coordinated entirely by graduate students. Each year, professors and graduate students from all over the globe present papers on literature, film, and interdisciplinary topics in French, Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese. For more information including the full schedule and keynote speakers, please click here.

 

Co-sponsored by: Department of Romance Studies, Graduate School, GPSF, School of Arts and Science, African Studies Center, Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Department of Art, Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, Institute for the Studies of the Americas, Religious Studies Department, Office of Undergraduate Research, Center for Global Initiatives

 

Click here for the schedule and locations

UNC Chapel Hill


Palestinian Culture Night at Hanes Art Auditorium

March 24, 2017 ” />

 

 

Join Students for Justice in Palestine for a celebration of Palestinian culture that includes instrumentalist and filmmaker Sijal Nasralla, spoken- word artist Zaina Alsous, Emmy Award-winning poet Tariq Luthun, and a traditional Palestinian dance team (Dabkeh) headed by Sarena Triesh.

 

This event is sponsored by Students for Justice in Palestine. For more information, click here.

 

Hanes Art Auditorium, Room 121

UNC Chapel Hill


“Namour” Film Screening and Panel Discussion

March 24, 2017 ” />

Please join us on March 23rd for a film screening and discussion of “Namour.”  This screening is part of a debut screening event ahead the Netflix release. From Ava Durvernay’s ARRAY Films, A stylized homage to Los Angeles, NAMOUR explores the complexities of personal responsibility versus moral convictions. Featuring an international cast, the movie stars Karim Saleh (IRON MAN 2, KINGDOM OF HEAVEN), Waleed Zuaiter (20th CENTURY WOMAN, LONDON HAS FALLEN, OMAR) and new comer, Wedad Abdou. Chronicling the unraveling of Steven Bassem (Saleh), a valet driver for a trendy Los Angeles restaurant caught between his dead-end job and the demands of his Arab-American immigrant family.

 

The panel discussion following the screening will feature Dr. Akram Khater, Dr. Juliane Hammer, and Dr. Nadia Yaqub. Please find more information and RSVP here.

 

Sonja Haynes Stone Center

UNC Chapel Hill


Soup for Syria: A lunchtime presentation with Janet Cowell

March 24, 2017 ” />

You are invited to a captivating lunchtime presentation from former State Treasurer Janet Cowell. She has just returned from Jordan where she learned first-hand about the Syrian refugee crisis, its effect on children and the humanitarian efforts to help them. We will have soups honoring traditions from around the world, salads and breads for lunch, and all proceeds will go toward QuestScope.org to support its work helping Syrian children in Jordan.

Please bring your CHECK for $25 (or more!) made out to QuestScope (the organization through which Janet Cowell worked. We cannot accept credit cards or cash.)

RSVP contact: Deborah Nelson at DNelson52@nc.rr.com. We look forward to seeing you there!

This event is organized through a volunteer effort. Sponsors: include Foundation for Do, Deborah C. Nelson, Ninal Szlosberg, and John Wilson. Additional contributors to be determined.

 


African Migration in Comparative Perspective Film Screening: ‘Fire At Sea’ (2016)

March 27, 2017 ” />

Join us for the kick-off to the ‘African Migration in Comparative Perspective’ conference with a screening of ‘Fire at Sea.’

An Academy Award® nominee for Best Documentary Feature and the first nonfiction film to ever win the top prize at the Berlin International Film Festival, Fire at Sea takes place in Lampedusa, a remote Mediterranean island that has become a major entry point for refugees into Europe. There, we meet Samuele, a 12-year-old boy who lives simply, climbing rocks by the shore and playing with his slingshot. Nearby, we bear witness as thousands of men, women, and children risk their lives to make the brutal crossing from Africa. Award-winning filmmaker Gianfranco Rosi masterfully juxtaposes these realities, jolting the audience into a new understanding of what is happening in the region, the heavy toll of the migrant crisis, and the price of freedom.

Sponsored by the Africa Initiative and African and African American Studies (AAAS). For more information, please contact Deirdre White at deirdre.white@duke.edu or visit https://aaas.duke.edu/events/african-migration-comparative-perspective.

Location: Smith Warehouse – Bay 5, B189

Location: Loca

 


Seminar: Revisiting the Development-Security Nexus: Civilian and Military Perspectives

March 28, 2017 ” />

In the international community, addressing the global challenges of poverty, instability, violence, terrorism, disease pandemics, and state fragility is an enduring premise that calls for a combination of socioeconomic development and security interventions. Policy responses that join development and security involve the expertise and resources of national government agencies, international organizations, military and police forces, non-governmental organizations and civil society, plus academics and the research community. The policy analytic and operational frames applied to the development–security nexus influence what solutions are pursued and which of these actors are engaged. This seminar offers presentations and discussion that illustrate the interplay among frames, solutions, and interventions from different actors’ perspectives.

10:30 a.m.–Noon Light refreshments will be served.

Speakers:

Dr. Derick W. Brinkerhoff (Moderator), Distinguished Fellow in International Public Management, RTI International Evolving Policy Perspectives on State Fragility and Global Responses

David Douglass, Manager in Disaster Relief and Response Governance, Fragility and Conflict: Kyrgyz Republic Transition Initiative (KRTI)

Captain Erin Moffitt, Alpha Company Commander, 96th Civil Affairs Battalion (Airborne) Factors Impacting Pathways Toward Violent Extremism in Jordan

Dr. Jennifer M. Hazen, Lecturer, Public Policy & Peace, War, and Defense, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Lessons Learned at the Intersection of War, Politics, and Society

Please register to attend.

Questions? Contact MaryBeth Branigan at branigan@rti.org.

Location:Dreyfus Auditorium, Haynes Building Research Triangle Park, NC, 27709


Urdu Majlis

March 30, 2017 ” />

Please join us Friday March 31, 2017 for the next monthly meeting of Urdu Majlis, the Triangle’s Urdu Literary Forum. This Urdu Majlis will concentrate on the life and works of Ghulam Rabbani Taban (1914-1992). The event will also have original poetry by participants and refreshments.

 

This event is free and open to the public. This event is co-sponsored by the Carolina Asia Center and the South Asia Section of the UNC Dept. of Asian Studies. Urdu Majlis is an intellectual endeavor with no political or religious affiliations. For more information, please contact Afroz Taj at taj@unc.edu.

 

New West, room 219

UNC-Chapel Hill


Tea with Tagouri

March 30, 2017 ” />

UNC MSA presents Tea with Tagouri! Our special guest, Noor Tagouri, will be joining us the afternoon of April 1st as she shares a universally powerful message of acceptance and embracing individuality in a multi-cultural society.  Noor is a first-generation Libyan American and on-air journalist for Newsy with a social media following rapidly approaching one million. Since launching the viral #letnoorshine campaign in 2012, she has gained international attention, including a history-making appearance in the October 2016 “Renegades” issue of Playboy, in which she was the first woman ever within its pages to wear a hijab. Noor has achieved game-changing breakthroughs on her journey to become the first hijabi journalist on commercial U.S. television, along the way establishing a strong platform to empower others to break normative stereotypes and realize their own potential in a multi-cultural society.
This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please click here.

 

Genome Building, room G200

UNC-Chapel Hill


Brownbag Session with Mr. Courtney Brown on the Encompassing Wars in Syria

March 30, 2017 ” />

Join Mr. Courtney Brown on April 5th to discuss the three encompassing wars in Syria: the war between the opposition and Assad, the war against ISIS (and how the US Government is approaching it), the war within the opposition (between moderate and extremist elements (consisting of al Qaeda). For the past five years, Courtney Brown has lived in Turkey managing humanitarian and non-lethal assistance programs for the US State Department inside Syria.  Working as part of the Syria Transition Assistance Response Team (START), Brown managed programs that focused on providing humanitarian assistance to war-affected populations inside Syria. Brown is from Albemarle, North Carolina, and is an alumnus of UNC (Class of ’96).

 

This event is sponsored by the Curriculum for Peace, War and Defense. For more information, please click here.

 

Hamilton Hall, Room 569

UNC-Chapel Hill


Israel Fest 2017

March 30, 2017 ” />

An all-encompassing event that celebrates all things Israel! Come learn about the culture, language, technology, food, and other entities that make Israel a great and unique country! There will be free food and t-shirts; make sure to stop by! This event is open to all students, staff, friends, family, and the entire UNC Chapel Hill community.
This event is co-sponsored by Chabad at UNC & DukeNorth Carolina HillelCHAI: Chapel Hill Ahavat Israel CommitteeJ Street UNCHeels for IsraelProject Krav MagaThe Hebrew Program at UNC-Chapel Hill. For more information, please click here.

 

The Pit

UNC-Chapel Hill


Making Moderate Islam: a Conversation with Dr. Rosemary Corbett

March 30, 2017 ” />

Dr. Rosemary Corbett joins us to discuss her recently published book, “Making Moderate Islam: Sufism, Service, and the ‘Ground Zero Mosque’ Controversy”. Drawing on a decade of research into the community that proposed the so-called “Ground Zero Mosque,” Dr. Corbett traces the broader history of pressures placed on religious minorities in the last century to conform to dominant American frameworks for race, gender, and political economy. These include the encouraging of community groups to provide social services to the dispossessed in compensation for the government’s lack of welfare provisions in an aggressively capitalist environment. Calls for Muslim moderation in particular are also colored by racist and orientalist stereotypes about the inherent pacifism of Sufis with respect to other groups.

 

Dr. Corbett is currently Visiting Professor at the Bard Prison Initiative. More information about her book can be found here. Free parking is available at the FedEx Center starting at 5 PM. For more information, please contact Samah Choudhury, samah@unc.edu.

 

This lecture is sponsored by the Islamicate Graduate Student Association, UNC Student Congress, UNC Department of Religious Studies, the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, UNC Department of Sociology, UNC Cultural Studies Program.

 

FedEx Global Education Center, Room 2008/2010

UNC-Chapel Hill


Film: Docunight #36: Sonita

March 30, 2017 ” />

Sonita, Directed by Rokhsareh Ghaem Maghami, 2015 / 91 min, Persian with English Subtitles

 

If the 18-year old Sonita had a say in things, Michael Jackson would be her father and Rihanna her mother! She is a dreamer, always writing things about her big dream of becoming a famous rapper in her scrapbook. This, given the fact that women are not even allowed to sing in Iran! So for the time being, her only fans are the other teenage girls in the Tehran shelter; where as a refugee from Afghanistan, Sonita is getting help and counseling for the trauma she has suffered. As an added complication, her family has a very different future planned for her: As a bride in an arranged marriage, she is worth $9,000!  How can Sonita succeed in making her dreams come true?

 

Rokhsareh Ghaemmaghami is a Sundance Award-winning documentary filmmaker who was born in Tehran. She has a BA in cinema and an MA in animation. She has made several short and feature-length documentaries, and has done researches on “animated documentary” and Cyanosis is her work for her MA degree. Her research has been published as a book in Iran.

 

Hosted by the Graduate Student Association of Iranians at Duke.  For more information, visit here.

 

John Hope Franklin Center, Ahmadieh Family Conference Hall, Room 240

Duke University


Foucault in Iran: Islamic Revolution after the Enlightenment

March 30, 2017 ” />

Behrooz Ghamari-Tabrizi examines Foucault’s writings on the Iranian Revolution as an attempt to write the history of the present without binding commitments to a teleological historiography. Is it possible for a people to envision and desire futures uncharted by already existing schemata of history? Is it possible to think of dignity, justice, and liberty outside the cognitive maps and principles of the Enlightenment?

 

Behrooz Ghamari-Tabrizi is Associate Professor of Sociology and History. He is the author of Islam and Dissent in Postrevolutionary Iran (I.B. Tauris/Palgrave-MacMillan, 2008), Remembering Akbar: Inside the Iranian Revolution (O/R Books, 2016), and Foucault in Iran: Islamic Revolution after the Enlightenment (University of Minnesota Press, 2016).

 

For more information, contact Anne Allison. Sponsored by the Humanities Futures Initiative at the Franklin Humanities Institute; Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute; Kenan Institute’s Campus Grants; Duke University Middle East Studies Center; Duke University Islamic Studies Center; Offices of Dean Nowicki and Dean Petters; Department of Cultural Anthropology

 

Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall, Smith Warehouse

Duke University


Documenting the Middle East Film Festival: The Wanted 18 & a 10-minute trailer for Al-Nakba and the City of Lyd: A Work in Progress

March 30, 2017 ” />

The Wanted 18 will be introduced by Nancy Kalow (Center for Documentary Studies) and the trailer for Al-Nakba and the City of Lyd will be introduced by the director Sarah Friedland. After both, there will be a Q&A with Nancy Kalow, Sarah Friedland, and Sofia Farah, a UNC graduate student from a town near where The Wanted 18 takes place!

 

In The Wanted 18, it is 1987, and the first Palestinian popular movement in the West Bank is rising. Residents want local alternatives to Israeli goods, including milk, which they’ve been buying from an Israeli company. And so begins the strange story of 18 smuggled cows. This showing is a special copy of the film that is in Arabic (including the animated cows’ dialogue!) with English subtitles.

This event is co-sponsored by the Duke Middle East Studies Center, Screen/Society, AMES Presents, the Program in the Arts of the Moving Image (AMI), and Duke Libraries. For more information, click here or visit our webpage.

 

Richard White Auditorium, East Campus

Duke University


Understanding Islam and Muslims: A Panel Discussion

March 30, 2017 ” />

Join the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, the UNC Campus Y, and the UNC Muslim Students Association for a discussion about Islam and the variety of lived experiences of Muslim Americans. Panelists will answer FAQ’s, share personal experiences, discuss current challenges, and answer questions from participants. The event aims to help create a campus environment of understanding and inclusivity. Panelists include:

-Mariam Baaj, Education Chair, UNC Muslim Students Association
-Dr. Carl Ernst, William R. Kenan, Jr., Distinguished Professor Co-Director, Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations
-Iyman Gaspard, Program Manager, Center for Global Initiatives
-Soumaya Lansari, UNC Class of 2018

 

For more information, please contact harver@email.unc.edu or visit here.

 

Campus Y, Queen Anne Lounge

UNC-Chapel Hill


Film Screening: Little Gandhi

March 31, 2017 ” />

Join the Arab Student Organization for a screening of the Little Gandhi Movie followed by a discussion with its director, Sam Kadi, on Wednesday, April 5th at the Union Auditorium. Little Gandhi documents the story of iconic Syrian peace activist Ghiyath Matar, whose brutal torture and death at the age of 26 outraged the international community and erupted into one of the most violent uprisings in modern history. It has been shown in Congress, the Canadian Parliament, and across the world, and has been praised for the light it sheds on the most pressing humanitarian crisis of our generation. Doors open at 6, the movie begins at 6:30, and the panel begins at about 8:15.

Co-Hosts: The Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense; University Presbyterian Church; Dr. Mark Peifer; UNC MSA; Students Organize for Syria

Location: UNC Student Union Auditorium

This event is free of charge and open to the public. For more information, please visit here: https://www.facebook.com/events/213533092460204/

 


Panel Discussion: Understanding and Combating Islamophobia

April 4, 2017 ” />

The People’s Teach-­in Series presents “Understanding and Combating Islamophobia.”

A panel discussion with –

Dr. Juliane Hammer, Associate Professor and Kenan Rifai Scholar of Islamic Studies

Dr. Sarah Shields, Associate Professor in history and Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Professor

Dr. Charlie Kurzman, Associate Professor in Sociology and Middle East Studies

Khadiga Konsouh, UNC Muslim Student Association Vice President

Fatema Ahmed, Muslims, for, Social, Justice

Carolina Legal Services

Hosted by Respect For All Tar Heels, a graduate and professional student organization

respectforalltarheels@gmail.com | facebook.com/respectforalltarheels

Location: Hamilton 100


Lecture: Mark Farha, ‘The Contagion of Confessionalism in the Middle East: Historical Sources and Political Remedies’

April 6, 2017 ” />

Please join the Carolina Seminar on Global and Modern Transnational History for a talk by Mark Farha on ‘The Contagion of Confessionalism in the Middle East: Historical Sources and Political Remedies’.

Mark Farha obtained his PhD from Harvard University in 2007 where he also served as a Head Teaching Fellow with distinction.  From 2008-2015, he served as Assistant Professor of Government at the School of Foreign Service in Doha, Qatar. He is a fellow of the University of Bielefeld and was a Senior Associate Member at St. Anthony’s College, Oxford in 2013. In 2015, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Politics at the Doha Institute for Graduate Studies where he teaches courses in Arabic on regional foreign policy, Political Economy of the Middle East and Arab Political Thought.  His scholarly publications have focused on the origins of secularism and sectarianism in the Middle East and Lebanon in particular.  He has given lectures in English, Arabic and German at Universities such as Harvard, Columbia and UCLA, as well as Tuebingen, Cambridge, Zurich, Melbourne, Addis Abada, Singapore and Tokyo.

This talk is presented by the Carolina Seminar on Global and Modern Transnational History, the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, and the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations.

Location: Room 2008


Workshop: The Trauma of Islamophobia and the Ethics of Social Justice in Practice and Policy with Anderson Al Wazni

April 6, 2017 ” />

The Pro Bono Counseling Network Education Series Presents:

The Trauma of Islamophobia and the Ethics of Social Justice in Practice and Policy

The purpose of this workshop is to present the rise of Islamophobia within the United States as it relates to issues of social justice, advocacy, and clinical work with Muslim clients. The basic beliefs and demographics of the Muslim faith will be presented before examining the history of both U.S. policy and social activism in relationship to perpetuating myths of Islam that has led to the development of contemporary Islamophobia and its negative ramifications. A particular focus will be given to the exploitation of feminist activism and the image of the veiled Muslim woman to place these issues into a contemporary context, using examples from the presenter’s academic research as well as recent events in our country in the wake of the 2016 elections. Following this, a closer examination of clinical work with Muslim clients will be presented including problems found in the clinical encounter in recent research studies, suggestions for cultural competency when working with Muslim clients, and how best to serve Muslim populations as both a professional advocate and ally. Time will be allocated for participants to ask questions and engage in dialogue to enhance their understanding of the material presented.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this workshop, participants should be able to:

–Understand basic beliefs of Muslims and American Muslim community

–Recognize Islamophobia in the form of hate crimes, policy, and sociopolitical language

–Gain a deeper appreciation for the historical narrative of Muslim as terrorist that existed pre-9/11

–Recognize personal bias in clinical encounter and social interactions

–Gain insight into better interventions with Muslim clients

–Identify how to be an ally or policy advocate

Two contact hours will be available for this training. Free to all current Pro Bono Counseling Network Volunteer Therapists or other therapists who practice in Durham, Orange, Person or Chatham counties and would like to become a Pro Bono Counseling Network Therapist. For more information on joining and becoming a volunteer therapist, contact Shelley Danser, the program coordinator: Shelley.D@fhrecovery.org.

Register Now!

Anderson Al Wazni, MSW

Anderson Al Wazni (MSW) is a 2014 graduate of Smith College whose thesis research was published in the 2015 NASW Social Work journal. She currently works as freelance writer and speaker on Islamophobia, feminism, and countering extremism.  She has also been featured in the Oxford University Press Blog, international religious publications, and presented at both national and state NASW conferences. She continues to conduct research and will be a part time lecturer at Smith College School for Social Work in the 2017 Continuing Education Seminar Series. In addition to social work, Anderson is a part time student in Shia Islamic studies at the Al Mahdi Institute in Birmingham, England. She currently lives in the Triangle area of NC.


Duke University’s Race Workshop presents: Acting Muslim – Religious identity performance and the 1stAmendments during the war on terror and the Trump moment with Khaled Beydoun

April 7, 2017 ” />

 

 

Khaled A. Beydoun is an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law, and Senior Affiliated Faculty at the University of California-Berkeley Islamophobia Research & Documentation Project. A Critical Race Theorist, Professor Beydoun’s research examines the legal construction of Arab and Muslim American identity, the foundational and modern development of Islamophobia, and the intersection of national security policy, civil liberties and citizenship.

 

Race Workshop is supported by the Sociology department, the African and African American Studies department, the Social Sciences Division of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Duke Samuel DuBois Cook Center, and SSRI. This event is also being co-sponsored by Duke’s Islamic Studies Center. For more information, please contact Nura Sediqe at nsediqe@gmail.com.

 

Sociology/Psychology 329

Duke University


Lecture: The Arabic Collection in the Library of Congress with Dr. Muhannad Salhi

April 7, 2017 ” />

Dr. Muhannad Salhi is an Arab World Specialist of the African and Middle Eastern Division at the The Library of Congress. Dr. Salhi will provide an overview of the history and present state of the collection. This event is part of the History Department’s “Archives of Africa, Asia, and the Mediterranean” Program. A light lunch will be provided.

 

Sponsors: Professional Affairs Committee of the Librarians Assembly of Duke University; Triangle Seminar on the Histories of Muslim Societies & Communities. For more information, contact Jamie Hardy at jamie.hardy@duke.edu or 919-684-2409.

 

Rubenstein Library Carpenter Conference Room 249

Duke University


Islam and Black Feminism with Dr. Jamillah Karim

April 7, 2017 ” />

 

Join us as we welcome Dr. Jamillah Karim for her talk, “Islam and Black Feminism”. Karim is a former Professor of Religion at Spelman College who specializes in Islam and Muslims in the United States (African American, South Asian and Arab), Islamic Feminism, Race and Ethnicity, and Immigration and Transnational Identity. She is also the author of “American Muslim Women: Negotiating Race, Class, and Gender” and the co-author of “Women of the Nation: Between Black Protest and Sunni Islam”. For more information, visit here.

 

Co-sponsors: Asian & Middle East Studies; Duke Islamic Studies Center; Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies; Human Rights Center @ FHI

 

Pink Parlors

Duke University


An Economy of Knowledge in the Eastern Mediterranean with Robert Morrison, Bowdoin College

April 7, 2017 ” />

This presentation, focused on intellectual life in the Eastern Mediterranean around 1500, will show how much Renaissance Italy owes to earlier scholars located in Islamic societies. The link between the Renaissance and earlier centuries was a network of Jewish scholars who bridged the Ottoman Empire, Candia (on Crete), and the Veneto.  These scholars exchanged information on topics that included astronomy, astrology, medicine, philosophy, and religious thought.  Although historians of science have been most attracted to the possibility of explaining the parallels between Renaissance astronomy and the astronomy of Islamic societies, this presentation demonstrates that there is a much broader context that comprised a number of fields.  Most important, we shall see that information flowed in both directions as the scholarly intermediaries were quite interested in developments in Europe.  Lunch will be served.

 

The event is sponsored by Humanities Futures, Religions and Public Life, and the History Department.  Contact Bruce Hall (bh71@duke.edu) for more information.

 

101 West Duke Bldg

Duke University


The James P. Gorter Annual Lecture presents: A Conversation with Khizr Khan

April 7, 2017 ” />

Khizr Khan, a Muslim American Gold Star father, entered the national spotlight when he spoke at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Khan is a lawyer and holds degrees from Punjab University and Harvard Law School. His work deals with the fields of immigration and international business law and founded a pro bono project to provide legal services for the families of men and women serving in the military.

 

James P. Gorter Lectureship honors Jim’s contributions as founder and inaugural chair of the Duke Islamic Studies Center Advisory Board. He is a retired partner and member of the Management Committee of Goldman Sachs and is an alumnus of Princeton University and the London School of Economics where he was Woodrow Wilson fellow.  Jim and his wife, Audrey, have two children and a grandson who graduated from Duke.

 

This event is sponsored by the Duke Islamic Studies Center and the Kenan Institute for Ethics.  For more information, visit here.

 

Trent Semans Center Great Hall

Duke University (Medical Campus)


From Durham, To Syria With Love: A Benefit for Displaced Syrian Refugees at Motorco Music Hall

April 7, 2017 ” />

Bands and artists from the Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill Music Community have partnered with the local chapter of Americans for Refugees in Crisis (ARC) to raise awareness about how Americans can engage, adopt and change the lives of Syrian refugee families living in crisis. Funds raised from the event will go towards ARC’s sponsored Syrian family, the Diab’s. Together we can help them leave a refugee camp in Lebanon and move into safer, cleaner and healthier apartment environment, while they rebuild their lives. This will be a day of music, education and love.

 

Hosted by Americans for Refugees in Crisis. For more information, please click here.

 

Motorco Music Hall

723 Rigsbee Ave, Durham NC


Turkish Music Night- A Fundraiser for ATA-NC

April 7, 2017 ” />

 

Join us for a night of live music at Tallulas Restaurant in Chapel Hill to raise money for ATA-NC, including events like the annual Children’s Day Festival of Cary, Nazım Hikmet Poetry Festival, and national holiday celebrations.  Tickets are $10 in advance or $15 at the door.  Joining us from Istanbul, ney (Turkish reed flute) virtuoso Burcu Karadağ will be accompanied by New York-based oud (ud) player Yücel Üstündağ and keyboardist Zafer Çakadur as these three talented musicians play everything from Turkish folk music to classical music (Türk Sanat Müziği) to contemporary pop hits. For more information, click here.

 

Tallulah’s Restaurant

Chapel Hill, NC


Languages Across the Curriculum Workshop

April 11, 2017 ” />

Please join UNC and Duke for a Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Professional Development Workshop. The workshop facilitator will be Dr. Suronda Gonzalez of Binghamton and chair of the CLAC Consortium. UNC-CH’s LAC Program offers students the opportunity to use world languages in a variety of courses outside the language and literature curricula. The program aims to promote a better understanding of world regions while demonstrating the relevance of practical language skills across the disciplines. For more information about LAC, please visit http://areastudies.unc.edu/lac/.
This event is free and open UNC and Duke faculty, staff, and graduate students. Registration is required. Please register by April 20 by emailing roberto@email.unc.edu.
FedEx Global Education Center, room 3024
UNC

Persian Art Center in Carolina: “Liberated Women in Shahnameh (the Book of Kings): The love story of Bijan and Manijeh”

April 11, 2017 ” />

The program will begin with a social from 4-4:30, followed by a welcome and introduction by Dr. Amir Rezvani. The speaker is Mrs. Maryam Tabibzadeh who will lead a discussion on the powerful role of women in expressing themselves and demanding rights in Shahnameh, followed by the powerful and emotional love story of Bijan and Manijeh as an example. The presentation will be followed by live music and poetry readings from 6:30-7:30.
The Persian Poetry Group in Chapel Hill honors, respects and promotes freedom of speech and expression. Organized by: The Persian Art Center in Carolina. For more information: 919-259-0959.
400 Oak Tree Drive (The Club House)
Chapel Hill, NC 27517

New Book Roundtable with Mona Hassan, Richard Bulliet & Vincent Cornell

April 12, 2017 ” />

Please join us for a roundtable discussion of our colleague Mona Hassan’s new book Longing for the Lost Caliphate: A Transregional History (Princeton University Press, December 2016) with Richard Bulliet (Columbia University) and Vincent Cornell (Emory University).

Richard Bulliet and Vincent Cornell will present on the scholarly interventions of Longing for the Lost Caliphate followed by Mona Hassan’s response as the author and an open discussion of the book among those in attendance.

In the United States and Europe, the word “caliphate” has conjured historically romantic and increasingly pernicious associations. Yet the caliphate’s significance in Islamic history and Muslim culture remains poorly understood. This book explores the myriad meanings of the cali-phate for Muslims around the world through the analytical lens of two key moments of loss in the thirteenth and twentieth centuries. Through ex-tensive primary-source research, Mona Hassan explores the rich constellation of interpretations created by religious scholars, historians, musi-cians, statesmen, poets, and intellectuals. Hassan fills a scholarly gap regarding Muslim reactions to the destruction of the Abbasid caliphate in Baghdad in 1258 and challenges the notion that the Mongol onslaught signaled an end to the crit-ical engagement of Muslim jurists and intellectu-als with the idea of an Islamic caliphate. She also situates Muslim responses to the dramatic aboli-tion of the Ottoman caliphate in 1924 as part of a longer trajectory of transregional cultural memory, revealing commonalities and differ-ences in how modern Muslims have creatively interpreted and reinterpreted their heritage.

Location: 225 Friedl Building, East Campus

Lunch will be served, please RSVP here: https://goo.gl/forms/ZJxHRE7MsqKhVujc2.

Sponsored by: Triangle Seminar on the Histories of Muslim Societies & Communities, the Graduate Program in Religion, and the Muslim Diasporas Working Group – Kenan Institute for Ethics.


Mr. Essam El-Din Ibrahim: “The relationship between the Ancient Egyptian language and the Egyptian colloquial”

April 13, 2017 ” />

 

Mr. Essam El-Din Ibrahim is a Director of the Department of Technical Support and Electronic Communication at the Ministry of Antiquities Technical Office, and a former director of the Egyptian museum.

 

Mr. Essam El-Din Ibrahim will give a lecture from Egypt via Skype on Tuesday, April 18 in the FedEx Global Education Center, room 1009 from 5:30 to 6:30 PM. Beginning at 6:30 PM, students in Arabic classes at UNC will  compete in Qur’an and calligraphy competitions. Winning students will receive awards.

 

This event is sponsored by the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations and the Center for Global Initiatives. Please contact fbadr@email.unc.edu with questions.

 

FedEx Global Education Center, room 1009

UNC Chapel Hill


NC Persian Festival

April 13, 2017 ” />

Come join the Iranian Cultural Society of North Carolina for a full day of fun! There will be cultural dance and music, art, poetry and cultural celebrations, as well as Persian food. Admission is $5. For more information please contact Freydoun Naeymi-rad at nismuc@hotmail.com.

 

Kerr Scott Building, NC State Fairground

Raleigh, NC


The Triangle Institute for Security Studies’ Thirteenth Annual Honor Student Dinner

April 13, 2017 ” />

The Triangle Institute for Security Studies cordially invites you to come and listen to the presentations of four of the Triangle’s finest undergraduates at its Thirteenth Annual Honor Student Dinner. The event will take place in the Willow Lounge at the Friday Center in Chapel Hill. Reservations required. Please visit the event page and sign up no later than April 19th.

 

Invited speakers:

Alexandra Gombar, UNC-Chapel Hill: UN Peacekeeping Responses to Genocide

James Ferencsik, Duke: Counterterrorism and Salafi-Jihadist Radicalization Networks

Sarah Adams, UNC-Chapel Hill: Whistleblowers and Insider Threats

Nick Johnston, Duke: Recruitment Strategy of Islamic State

 

For more information, please contact Dr. Carolyn Pumphrey, pumphrey@duke.edu.

 

Friday Center

UNC-Chapel Hill


Meet the Authors: Nahida Halaby Gordon and Samia Halaby

April 13, 2017 ” />

Authors Nahida Halaby Gordon and Samia Halaby will be presenting readings from their books at the Whole Foods community room, Ridgewood shopping center on Wade Avenue in Raleigh.

Nahida Halaby Gordon, Ph.D., Professor Emerita in Probability and Statistics at Case Western Reserve University has a deep interest in Palestine, which motivated her to serve as a Fulbright Senior Scholar at Birzeit University, Palestine. And with the support of a US Congress, Fulbright-Hayes Senior Scholar Program grant engaged in an exchange program with faculty at the Institute of Community and Public Health at Birzeit University, Palestine.

Born in Jerusalem, Palestine, in 1936, Samia A. Halaby received a Master of Fine Arts degree from Indianan University in 1963. She taught for 17 years, ten of which were at the Yale School of Art. Her paintings use oils, acrylics, encaustic, and electronic media, and her work encompasses writing, performance, and activism for Palestine.

For more information, please click here. Sponsored by the Coalition for Peace with Justice.

Whole Foods Market
Ridgewood Shopping Center, 3540 Wade Ave, Raleigh, NC 27607


Music on the Porch: Marco Pavé and Alfred Banks

April 13, 2017 ” />

Join the Center for the Study of the American South for a free outdoor concert series, Music on the Porch. CSAS is proud to be a stop on the River Kings 2.0 tour, which spans from New Orleans to Brooklyn. One of the featured artists, Marco Pave, has been described as a “millennial Muslim from Memphis.” Marco conducts workshops around the country on hip-hop and social justice, and he advocates greater support for the arts. For more information, click here.

 

Sponsored by the Center for the Study of the American South.

 

The Center for the Study of the American South, 410 East Franklin Street

UNC-Chapel Hill


Tea & Talk Series: Samee Siddiqui: Pan-Islamism and Anti-Colonialism in the Interwar Period: The Career of Muhammad Barkatullah (1864-1927)

April 13, 2017 ” />

This talk will look at the life of an Indian Muslim figure, Muhammad Barkatullah (1864-1927), who midway through his career transitioned from being a cosmopolitan intellectual to an anti-British revolutionary. Not only was his career based almost entirely outside of British India (including the United States and Japan), he helped connect the overseas Indian nationalist network to Pan-Islamists, Pan-Asianists, the Irish Republicans and the Bolsheviks. Through the lens of this Indian revolutionary, this talk will explore anti-colonialism, Pan-Islamism, race and civilizational discourse from the late 1880s to the mid-1920s. Samee Siddiqui is a PhD student at UNC-Chapel Hill in the History department studying Global History. Prior to moving to North Carolina, Samee worked as a journalist for Al Jazeera English (AJE) in their London and Doha offices.

 

Sandwiches and bubble tea will be served. For more information, click here. This event is sponsored by the Carolina Asia Center.

 

FedEx Global Education Center, Room 3009

UNC-Chapel Hill


Study Abroad 101 Info Session: Africa and the Middle East

April 13, 2017 ” />

 

Thinking about studying abroad? Interested in Africa or the Middle East? Come to this general information session to learn more about study abroad opportunities with a focus on programs in these regions.

 

Sponsored by the UNC Study Abroad Office.

 

FedEx Global Education Center, Room 2008

UNC-Chapel Hill


Film Screening: White Helmets

April 17, 2017 ” />

No Lost Generations is an national campus organization that has just started up this year at UNC to spread awareness about refugees and support organizations that are rising to aid displaced persons, with special emphasis on Middle Eastern refugees in light of the Syrian crisis. We will be showing the Oscars winning White Helmets in Bingham 121 and later lead a discussion on the movie’s topic.

Sponsored by: No Lost Generations. Contact No Lost Generations president Rain Brennan at nolostgenerationunc@gmail.com with questions.

Location: Bingham Hall, room 121


Cultural Event: Mimouna Celebration

April 18, 2017 ” />

The Hebrew Program at UNC and UNC Hillel invites you to Mimouna, a Moroccan Style Celebration at the End Passover.

Mimouna is the post-Passover celebration of friendship, brotherhood, and unity that is observed in Moroccan Jewish communities. It is a twenty-four hour celebration which begins immediately with the conclusion of Passover. It is viewed by many as the formal return to “chametz” (leavened bread) after such foods was forbidden over the course of the holiday. The theme of Mimouna is good fortune, fertility, wealth, and prosperity. see video

A Middle Eastern style sweet selection will be served. In addition, we will learn how to make “Mouflettas” a traditional Mimouna dish.

For more information contact: Hanna Sprintzik, Hebrew Lecturer, at hannasp@email.unc.edu or Ran Laviv, Hillel Israel Fellow at iasaf@nchillel.org.

This event is supported by The Hebrew Program at the Department of Asian Studies, the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies, and UNC Hillel.


Ancient Egyptian Language Workshop

April 20, 2017 ” />

Mr. Essam El-Din Ibrahim is a Director of the Department of Technical Support and Electronic Communication at the Ministry of Antiquities Technical Office, and a former director of the Egyptian museum. In this workshop on April 2, 5:30-6:30pm, Mr. Ibrahim will build upon the previous lecture given April 18 on the “Relationship between the Ancient Egyptian Language and the Egyptian Colloquial”.

Following the lecture at 7:00 PM, the Best Dish competition will begin with the former, current and new Arabic students and awards are sponsored by the Arabic program.

Please contact fbadr@email.unc.edu with questions.

This event is sponsored by the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations and the Center for Global Initiatives, and is open to the public.

Location: FedEx Global Education Center, room 1005


De-Constructing/Re-Constructing the Refugee Experience Monologues

April 20, 2017 ” />

On April 23, a group of Duke undergraduates will share spoken narratives of refugee life curated from interviews during a month of research with refugees in Jordan. The event, held at 6 p.m. at the Nasher Museum of Art, is part of a culmination of the students’ participation in the Kenan Institute for Ethics’ DukeImmerse program, which explores the dynamics of the global refugee crisis and the challenges it poses for refugees, host communities and international law. Each monologue will share aspects about the life of refugees met, with hope to increase understanding about displacement and its implications.

The event is free and open to the public. A collection of last year’s monologues can be found on Kenan’s YouTube channel. For more information, please visit here.

Nasher Museum of Art

Duke University


Lecture: “Soft and Hard Power in Islamic Political Thought” with Dr. Vasileios Syros

April 20, 2017 ” />

Dr. Vasileios Syros is currently a Maurice Amado Fellow at the Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania and a Senior Research Fellow at the Academy of Finland.

This presentation seeks to introduce a new perspective on Islamic debates on violence, by focusing on Islamic political advice literature on good government and the origins and effects of oppressive or arbitrary rule. In particular, it will explore how the distinction between ‘soft’ and ‘hard’ power can serve as a heuristic device for the examination of a set of medieval Islamic writings on the successful conduct of government. In addition, the paper will relate these ideas to European political thought, such as Machiavelli’s The Prince. The ultimate objective of the talk will be to identify and analyze broader affinities and points of intersection between Western and non-Western modes of political theorizing on statecraft and styles of leadership.

 

Sponsored by the Kenan Institute and the Center for Comparative Philosophy.  For more information, visit here. Lunch will be provided.

West Duke 08C

Duke University


Triangle Conference on the History of Muslim Societies

April 20, 2017 ” />

For the full conference program, visit here.

The Keynote Speech, “Religious Authority and Social History in the Islamic Near East

Medieval Problems, Modern Solutions,” will be given by Jonathan Berkey, Davidson College on Friday afternoon at 3pm. Subsequent panels over the two-day event will include: Constructing Muslim Identities, Historical Legacies, The Levant in Historical Perspective, Muslims under Non-Muslim Rule, and Visual and Material Culture.

 

Food will be served on Saturday, April 29th– Please RSVP to mustafa.tuna@duke.edu.

Sponsored by Triangle Seminar on the Histories of Muslim Societies and Communities, Duke University.

Friday April 28 | 3:00 – 6:00pm, Franklin Humanities Center, Room 240, Duke University

and Saturday April 29 | 9:00am – 7:30pm, National Humanities Center, 7 TW Alexander Dr, Durham, NC 27709


Ramadan Solidarity Iftar

April 24, 2017 ” />

Join ANERA on June 4 for a benefit iftar and spoken word performance by Omar Offendum. A full course dinner will be served.

ANERA (American Near East Refugee Aid) is a leading development organization improving the lives of Palestinian refugees and poor families in Gaza, the West Bank and Lebanon.

Omar Offendum is a Syrian-American Hip-Hop artist – born in Saudi Arabia, raised in Washington DC and living in Los Angeles. He has been featured on several major news outlets (Aljazeera / PBS / LA Times / Rolling Stone / VICE / NY Times / The European), toured the world to promote his ground-breaking music, helped raise hundreds of thousands of dollars for various humanitarian relief organizations, lectured at a number of prestigious academic institutions, and most recently been involved in creating several critically-acclaimed songs about the popular democratic uprisings throughout the Middle East & North Africa. He is currently hard at work on several new projects while touring to promote his solo release ‘SyrianamericanA‘.

For more information, please contact Hani AlMadhoun at halmadhoun@anera.org.

Location: Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Raleigh
3313 Wade Ave.
Raleigh, NC 27607

iftarunitarianuniversalist


Panel Discussion: Turkey’s 2017 Constitutional Referendum

April 27, 2017 ” />

On April 16, 2017, the Turkish government passed a national constitutional referendum that significantly increases the power of the president. What does this mean for Turkey and what might happen next? Join us for a panel discussion tomorrow. Panelists include:

Murat Sevinç, Professor of Constitutional Law

Banu Gökariksel, Associate Professor of Geography, UNC

Cemil Aydin, Associate Professor of History, UNC

Didem Turkoglu, PhD Candidate, Sociology, UNC

This event is sponsored by the Center for European Studies and the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations. It is the final segment of the six-part “Turkey Today” lecture series.  For more information, please contact lherbert@live.unc.edu.

FedEx Global Education Center, room 1005

UNC-Chapel Hill


Nations in Transition: Mexico & Turkey – A Dialogues Seminar

April 27, 2017 ” />

Mexico and Turkey are key nations in the recent social and political upheavals that have shaken public life in North America and Europe, yet outsiders often misunderstand the complex changes that are transforming both of these countries.  Join us for a Dialogues seminar with UNC Professors Cecilia Martinez-Gallardo and Cemil Aydin to explore the tensions within Mexican and Turkish societies and the influence of these nations on contemporary politics in the United States and Europe. Our seminar will include a comparative discussion of why the transitions in Mexico and Turkey are affecting transnational exchanges and attracting international attention.

The Challenges to Democratic Consolidation in Mexico

Cecilia Martinez-Gallardo, Associate Professor of Political Science

The Achievements, Failures and Turbulence of Democracy in Contemporary Turkey

Cemil Aydin, Associate Professor of History

Mexico, Turkey and Transnational Politics in America and Europe

A panel discussion with our speakers

A Dialogues Seminar in collaboration with the Institute for the Study of the Americas and the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations.

TIME & COST
9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, June 3, 2017. The tuition is $65.  A meal will not be offered with this seminar.

For information about lodging click here. Please contact Human@unc.edu with questions about this seminar.

Co-Sponsored by the General Alumni Association.

For information about GAA discounts and other scholarships available to Humanities Program participants, click here.

Register for this seminar.

Please note: Registered participants will receive an email with all the Dialogues seminar information a week before the program date.


Urdu Majlis Meeting

May 1, 2017

Dear Friends,

Please join us Friday April 28, 2017 for the Aril meeting of Urdu Majlis, the Triangle’s Urdu Literary Forum. This Urdu Majlis will concentrate on the life and works of Rais Amrohvi (1914-1988).

 

WHERE: Room 1009, FedEx Global Education Center,
301 Pittsboro Street, UNC, Chapel Hill, NC 27516

7:00 Saghar Siddiqui

8:00 Original poetry etc. by participants

9:00 Refreshments

9:30 Building closes

 

THIS EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

This event is co-sponsored by the Carolina Asia Center and the South Asia Section of the UNC Dept. of Asian Studies. Urdu Majlis is an intellectual endeavor with no political or religious affiliations.

For more information call:

Afroz Taj  919-851-1119 / 919-962-1060

Seema and Ashraf Faruqi 919-596-4792


Persian Art Center in Carolina Presents: The Secret World of Omar Khayyam, Rumi, and Sohrab Sepehri

May 12, 2017 ” />

4:00-4:30    Social
4:30-4:45    Introduction:  Dr. Amir Rezvani
4:45-6:00    Speakers: Dr. Ali Kasiri
6:00-6:30    Discussion
6:30-6:45    Break and refreshment
6:45-8:00    Live music and poetry reading by the audience
 
You can park at any parking space that is Not Marked Reserved and is not numbered. The Persian Poetry Group in Chapel Hill honors, respects and promotes freedom of speech and expression. Organized by: The Persian Art Center in Carolina. For more information: 919-259-0959.
400 Oak Tree Drive (The Club House)
Chapel Hill, NC 27517 

Feminist Geography Conference 2017: Insides and Outsides of Feminism

May 18, 2017 ” />

At this conference, there will be two sessions on geographies of Muslim women and several individual papers on the Middle East and Islam.

Saturday, May 20: 9:00-10:30am: Muslim women’s geographies – decolonizing discourses, re-writing everyday lives (Part I)

FedEx Global Education Center, Room 1005

*Awal, Akanksha: “Modernity, Mobility and Muslim young women in North India”

*Herbert, Lily: “Is Hijab for Kazakh Girls?”: Shifting the Borders of Kazakh Nationhood and the Modern in Almaty, Kazakhstan”

*Kamran, Sidra: “Desiring and resisting the zenana: Thinking through ‘public’ and ‘pleasure’”

Discussant: Gokariksel, Banu

Saturday, May 20: 10:50am-12:20pm: Muslim women’s geographies – decolonizing discourses, re-writing everyday lives (Part II)

FedEx Global Education Center, Room 1005

*Elder, Laura: “Gender and the politics of value in Islamic finance and financialization”

*Mobillion, Virginie: “Being a veiled Muslim woman in the Paris area: violence suffered for some, invisibility for others. Indices of French integration?”

*Schenk, Christine: “Islam, conflict, disaster: legislating citizenship in Aceh, Indonesia and Sri Lanka”

Discussant: Gokariksel, Banu

Please click here for more information about the conference, including registration.

FedEx Global Education Center

UNC-Chapel Hill


Turkish Food Festival

May 18, 2017 ” />

The Divan Center will host the 5th annual Turkish Food Festival. The event will feature delicious Turkish food, face painting, Turkish tea, water marbling, and Turkish coffee. It does not matter if you come to taste Turkish food for the first time or you just come back for more, the most important thing is to be together and have a good time. As the Turkish proverb says: “Neither coffee nor the coffeehouse is the heart’s behest. The heart seeks friendship; coffee is the pretext.” Free admission.

Please contact info@iitsnc.org with any questions.

 

1391 SE Maynard Rd. Cary, NC 27511


Syrian Refugee Picnic Potluck

May 18, 2017 ” />

Join Muslims of the Triangle LIST, United Church of Chapel Hill and Zakat Foundation of America in welcoming our new Syrian neighbors at a picnic potluck! Please bring a vegetarian side dish or dessert to share (please don’t use alcohol or gelatin in the preparation of your dish). Syrian families will be preparing main dishes for all to share.  A $5-$10 donation per person is requested to offset cost. If you are able to help drive refugee families to and from the picnic, please email Markie Davis at markie261@gmail.com.

Hosted by community partners: Muslims of the Triangle LIST, United Church of Chapel Hill and Zakat Foundation of America

 

Henry Anderson Park, Carrboro

302 Highway 54 West


Annual Conference: Research Committee on Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy

June 2, 2017 ” />

The Research Committee on Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy (RC19) of the International Sociological Association (ISA) brings together an active and lively community from various social sciences. Middle East-related conference sessions will include:

Thursday, June 22 | 5-7pm: Welcome and Panel on Immigration

Professor Deborah Weissman, Reef C. Ivey II Distinguished Professor of Law, UNC Chapel Hill

Paul Cuadros, Associate Professor in the School of Media and Journalism, UNC Chapel Hill

Friday, June 23 | 8:45am: Tuba Agartan, “New Public Management Reforms and Professional Autonomy: The Case of Turkish Health Care Reform” [Sigita Doblyte]
Friday, June 23 | 2:30pm: Daniel Béland and Michal Koreh, “Social Insurance, Payroll Taxes, and State Building: A Comparison between Québec and Israel” [John Stephens]

Visit the conference website for more information and the full schedule, and to register.

FedEx Global Education Center
UNC Chapel Hill


Lethal Aid and Human Security: Exploring the Impact of Military Assistance to Fragile States and Nonstate Actors

June 2, 2017

Free and open to the public.
 
Security assistance–providing weapons, training, advising, and other forms of assistance to foreign government and non-state armed forces–is playing an increasing role in US security strategy. How does the provision of military assistance impact governance, human security, and peacebuilding in fragile states? What steps can donor states take to prevent the misuse or diversion of their weapons transfers and lessen adverse impacts on societal welfare?
 
Colonel Carl Kelly, Dr. Rachel Kleinfeld, and Matt Schroeder will address these and other issues in a conversation moderated by Dr. Patricia Sullivan, professor of Public Policy and Peace, War, and Defense at UNC-Chapel Hill.
 
Gerrard Hall, 226 East Cameron Ave, UNC at Chapel Hill

Palestine Nature and Peace Studies Tour Featuring Mazin Qumsiyeh, PhD

June 15, 2017 ” />

An Update from Palestine with Mazin Qumsiyeh: Reception and Fundraiser

Wednesday, June 28 | 8-9:30pm

Mediterranean Deli

410 W. Franklin Street, Chapel Hill

Mazin Qumsiyeh, founder and Director of Palestine Museum of Natural History and Palestine Institute for Biodiversity Research at Bethlehem University, will talk about biodiversity and environmental threats in Palestine. Light refreshments will be served. Please RSVP by June 20 to 919-942-2535 or msmisch@gmail.com.

Lecture: Biodiversity and Conservation in the Holy Land

Thursday, June 29 | 7-8:30pm

Science Café, NC Museum of Natural Sciences

121 West Jones Street, Raleigh

Join Professor Qumsiyeh as he discusses the following topics: What are the plants and animals of the Holy Land? What environmental threats face them, and how can one help? What does a Palestinian Christian have to say about conflict resolution, Islam, and Islamophobia? Professor Qumsiyeh received the 2011 Social Courage Award from the Peace and Justice Studies Association at the Christian Brothers University in Tennessee. He is the author of The Bats of Egypt, Mammals of the Holy Land, Sharing the Land of Canaan, and more than 130 research papers.

After a career in the U.S. on the faculties of the University of Tennessee, Duke, and Yale, Professor Qumsiyeh teaches science and conflict resolution and does research at Bethlehem and Birzeit Universities in the occupied Palestinian territories. This lecture is free and open to the public.

For more information, see the museum website here or contact msmisch@gmail.com. Co-Sponsored by Charles M. Jones Peace and Justice Committee of Community Church of Chapel Hill Unitarian Universalist (www.c3huu.org/) and Coalition for Peace with Justice (www.cpwj.org). Endorsed by Abrahamic Initiative on the Middle East, Balance & Accuracy in Journalism, and Jewish Voice for Peace.


Chaand Raat/Eid Bazaar

June 22, 2017 ” />

Join us for an evening of shopping, henna, face painting, music/karaoke and much more. Come and enjoy the evening get-together with your family and friends and do last minute shopping for this coming Eid. This event is for the entire family and all are welcome. Light iftar will be provided at no cost, courtesy of the Faruqi family. Admission: General Admission $2.00 ; free for kids below 5.
 
For more information and vendor inquiry please email seemafaruqi@hotmail.com or call 919-475-1425.
Seasons @ Tandoor (Tandoor Indian Restaurant-Phone 919-484-2102)
5410 Greenwood Commons Shopping Center, Highway 55 Durham, NC 27713

Persian Art Center in Carolina presents: A Night of Persian Poetry and Live Music Performance

June 22, 2017 ” />

 
Join the Persian Art Center in Carolina for an analysis of poetry of two great contemporary Persian poets, Fereydoon Moshiri and Ahmad Shamloo. Speakers will include Dr. Amir Rezvani and Mr. Yousef  Amiri. The program will begin with a social from 4-4:30, followed by a welcome and introduction by Dr. Amir Rezvani. From 4:45-6:00, there will be presentations by Rezvani and Amiri, followed by an open forum and discussion. From 6:45-7:45 there will be live Persian music and poetry readings from your favorite poets. 
 
This event is free and open to public. *Please note that the this event will be in Persian. The Persian Poetry Group in Chapel Hill honors, respects and promotes freedom of speech and expression. For more information, please contact 919-259-0959.
400 Oak Tree Drive (The Club House)
Chapel Hill, NC 27517

Parviz Sayyad va Samadash – I LOVE TV

June 22, 2017 ” />

by Iranian Cultural Society of North Carolina (ICSNC)

 

The one and only, Parviz Sayyad, our celebrated Persian comedian, actor, director and screenwriter will present his latest comedy.

Tickets: $20 general, $10 students

** Above prices include all the service charges.**

– Student ID is required and will be validated at the entrance.

Please feel free to invite others to the event, and hope to see everyone there!

 

Fitzpatrick Center Schiciano Auditorium – Duke University

101 Science Drive

Durham, NC 27708